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  1.  14
    Denise Schaeffer (1994). The Public and the Private in Aristotle's Political Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):418-422.
  2.  11
    Denise Schaeffer (2000). Davis, Michael. The Autobiography of Philosophy: Rousseau's The Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):923-924.
  3. Michael Davis, Catherine H. Zuckert, Gwenda-lin Grewal, Mary P. Nichols, Denise Schaeffer, Christopher A. Colmo, David Corey, Matthew Dinan, Jacob Howland, Evanthia Speliotis, Ronna Burger & Christopher Dustin (eds.) (2013). Socratic Philosophy and its Others. Lexington Books.
    Engaging a broad range of Platonic dialogues, this collection of essays by distinguished scholars in political theory and philosophy explores the relation of Socratic philosophizing to those activities with which it is typically opposed—such as tyranny, sophistry, poetry, and rhetoric. The essays show that the harder one tries to disentangle Socrates’ own activity from that of its apparent opposite, the more entangled they become; yet, it is only by taking this entanglement seriously that the distinctive character of Socratic philosophy emerges. (...)
     
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  4. Denise Schaeffer (2014). Rousseau on Education, Freedom, and Judgment. Penn State University Press.
    In R_ousseau on Education, Freedom, and Judgment_, Denise Schaeffer challenges the common view of Rousseau as primarily concerned with conditioning citizens’ passions in order to promote republican virtue and unreflective patriotic attachment to the fatherland. Schaeffer argues that, to the contrary, Rousseau’s central concern is the problem of judgment and how to foster it on both the individual and political level in order to create the conditions for genuine self-rule. Offering a detailed commentary on Rousseau’s major work on education, Emile, (...)
     
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  5. Denise Schaeffer & Christopher Dustin (eds.) (2016). Socratic Philosophy and its Others. Lexington Books.
    Engaging a broad range of Platonic dialogues, this collection of essays by distinguished scholars in political theory and philosophy explores the relation of Socratic philosophizing to those activities with which it is typically opposed—such as tyranny, sophistry, poetry, and rhetoric. The essays show that the harder one tries to disentangle Socrates’ own activity from that of its apparent opposite, the more entangled they become; yet, it is only by taking this entanglement seriously that the distinctive character of Socratic philosophy emerges. (...)
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