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Profile: Dennis Beach (Saint John's University, MN)
  1. Dennis Beach (2004). History and the Other: Dussel’s Challenge to Levinas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (3):315-330.
    a product of human thought that betrays the lived uniqueness of persons, reducing ‘otherness’ to the categories of the understanding and to its historical consequences? Or is history too ‘thick’ to be synchronized in memory and historical consciousness? The article, taking its inspiration from Enrique Dussel’s ethics of liberation and particular moments of Latin American history, develops the notion of the proximity of history, phenomenologically critiquing Emmanuel Levinas’s own reduction of history to consciousness, his reading of history as a synchronizing (...)
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  2. Dennis Beach (2002). Is There a Grammar of Authenticity? Philosophy Today 46 (1):70-77.
    Heidegger presents the inauthenticity of everyday Dasein by focusing on the impersonal third-person use of the German "Das Man," paralleled in the English "they" or "one." Idle talk epitomizes the inauthentic possibilities of language. This essay traces the prevalence of inauthentic discourse through other grammatical structures, showing that inauthenticity indeed permeates all linguistic structures. However, the vocative dimension of all discourse is then presented, initially through an examination of the call of conscience, as a way in which we might be (...)
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  3. Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1995). Hume's Pragmaticist Argument for the Reality of God. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 9 (1):1 - 13.
    The author examines Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion to discover a variant of the usual teleological argument that abandons reliance on analogical reasoning. This second version, never refuted in the Dialogues, is termed "pragmaticist" in Peirce's sense. It relies on an abductive hypothesis that claims not logical proof but the power of instinctual conviction. The Dialogues' espousal of sound common sense may then be viewed as an imperfectly articulated precursor of Peirce's pragmaticist argument for the reality rather than the existence (...)
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  4. Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1993). Christianity—Sign Among Signs? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 7 (4):286 - 297.
    The author uses Eco's The Name of the Rose to pose the problem of the relation between the infinite aesthetic play of semiotics and pragmatic moral responsibility for human conduct. This problem is addressed through Peirce's semiotic theory, which not only links signs to objects, but situates them in an interpretant relation that is formative of human conduct. Religion is advanced as the paradigm of this relation; a "categorial semiotic" where concrete symbolic acts move beyond nominalism through real experience of (...)
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