Search results for 'Dennis Hume Wrong' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dennis Hume Wrong (1998). The Modern Condition: Essays at Century's End. Stanford University Press.
    In this collection, a leading sociologist brings his distinctive method of social criticism to bear on some of the most significant ideas, political and social events, and thinkers of the late twentieth century. In the first section, the author examines several concepts that have figured prominently in recent political-ideological controversies: capitalism, rationality, totalitarianism, power, alienation, left and right, and cultural relativism/ multiculturalism. He considers their origins, historical shifts in their meaning and the myths surrounding them, and their resonance beyond their (...)
     
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  2.  8
    Dennis H. Wrong (2000). Reflections on the Death of Socialism: Changing Perceptions of the State/Society Line. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 29 (2):175-185.
  3. David Hume & Henry David Aiken (1948). Hume's Moral and Political Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  4.  35
    Dennis H. Wrong (1997). Cultural Relativism as Ideology. Critical Review 11 (2):291-300.
    Abstract The concept of culture was originally an expression of German nationalism, which reacted to the French Enlightenment by asserting the uniqueness and incomparability of all cultures as historical creations. This understanding of cultural diversity, which prevailed in American anthropology, is widely understood to imply the moral equality of all cultures. Yet its relativism originally applied to different individuals socialized in the values of their culture, rather than to different cultures. The debate over multiculturalism, which presupposes cultural relativism, ignores this (...)
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  5. David Hume, David Fate Norton & Richard Henry Popkin (1965). David Hume Philosophical Historian. Bobbs-Merrill.
  6. Vinding Kruse & David Hume (1990). Hume's Philosophy in His Principal Work a Treatise of Human Nature and in His Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  7.  8
    Dennis H. Wrong (1999). Digby Baltzell: Sociologist and Critical Celebrant of the Upper Class. Sociological Theory 17 (1):112-116.
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    Dennis H. Wrong (2004). Is Capitalism Eternal? Critical Review 16 (1):23-32.
    Abstract Several scholars have observed that in contrast to ?socialism,? ?capitalism? was not an ideology promoted by a social class or movement but an economy that emerged ?spontaneously? from particular historical conditions. Since the decline of the Soviet Union, no new version of socialism has been promulgated, although complaints about the inequalities of capitalism inevitably persist and will certainly continue. Capitalism, if not ?eternal,? remains a highly probable form of economy under conditions of economic surplus, extensive division of labor, urbanism, (...)
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  9. John Hill Burton & David Hume (1846). Life and Correspondence of David Hume From the Papers Bequeathed by His Nephew to the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and Other Original Sources. William Tait.
  10. Frederick Henry Heinemann & David Hume (1940). David Hume, the Man and His Science of Man. Containing Some Unpublished Letters of Hume. Hermann.
     
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  11. David Hume (1979). Hume's Ethical Writings: Selections From David Hume. University of Notre Dame Press.
  12. David Hume (1992). Hume the Mind of a Genius : Autobiographical Extracts From David Hume. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  13. David Hume & George Birkbeck Norman Hill (1888). Letters of David Hume to William Strahan. Clarendon Press.
  14. ConferenceMcgill Bicentennial Hume, David Fate Norton, Wade L. Robison & Nicholas Capaldi (1979). Mcgill Hume Studies Edited by David Fate Norton, Nicholas Capaldi, Wade L. Robison. --. Austin Hill Press.
     
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  15. David Hume, Abraham John Henry Colburn and Co & Valpy (1820). Private Correspondence of David Hume with Several Distinguished Persons Between the Years 1761 and 1776, Now First Published From the Originals. [REVIEW] Printed for Henry Colburn and Co., Public Library, Conduit Street, Hanover Square.
  16. David Hume & Pierre Poivre (1778). The Life of David Hume, Esq; the Philosopher and Historian. Printed and Sold by Robert Bell ..
     
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  17. David Hume & Appelbaum (2001). The Vision of Hume.
     
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  18. Peter Kopf & David Hume (1987). David Hume Philosoph Und Wirtschaftstheoretiker.
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  19.  2
    David Hume (1990). Hume: Complete Works. Intelex Corporation.
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  20. Daniel Macqueen & David Hume (1990). Letters on Hume's History of Great Britain. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  21. Jean Pucelle & David Hume (1969). Hume Ou l'Ambiguité Présentation, Choix de Textes, Bibliographie. Seghers.
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  22. Dennis H. Wrong (1982). A Note on Marx and Weber in Gouldner's Thought. Theory and Society 11 (6):899-905.
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  23. Dennis H. Wrong (forthcoming). Class Fertility Differentials Before 1850. Social Research.
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  24. Dennis H. Wrong (1999). Digby Baltzell: Sociologist and Critical Celebrant of the Upper Class. Sociological Theory 17 (1):112-116.
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  25. Dennis H. Wrong (forthcoming). Human Nature and the Perspective of Sociology. Social Research.
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  26.  3
    J. Stafford (1999). Hume on Luxury: A Response to John Dennis? History of Political Thought 20 (4):646-648.
    Hume's essay ‘Of Luxury’ criticizes two extreme and contrasting doctrines: that luxury is always beneficial to society and that it is always baneful. Hume identifies the exponent of the first proposition as Bernard Mandeville in his book The Fable of the Bees, but does not name the second target of his essay. It is most probably John Dennis, one of Mandeville's contemporary critics. The evidence for this is that Hume challenges and contradicts three clearly defined (...)
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  27. Quentin Gibson (1982). "Power: Its Forms, Bases and Uses" by Dennis H. Wrong. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (4):452.
     
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  28.  2
    Laurent Jaffro (2006). What is Wrong with Reid's Criticism of Hume on Moral Approbation? European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):11-26.
    In his Essays on the Active Powers, Thomas Reid criticises Hume 's theory of moral judgment and argues that it is untenable. The aim of this paper is to show that Reid shares more with his target than is ordinarily acknowledged. The author suggests that the opposition between “cognitivism” and “non-cognitivism” concerning the role of feelings in moral judgment tends to obscure assumptions held in common by both philosophers about the nature of feelings.
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  29.  7
    William Edward Morris (2015). Dennis C. Rasmussen,The Pragmatic Enlightenment: Recovering the Liberalism of Hume, Smith, Montesquieu, and Voltaire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 349 Pp. $90.00 Hb. ISBN 9781107045002. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):141-145.
  30. Philip A. Reed (2012). What's Wrong with Monkish Virtues? Hume on the Standard of Virtue. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (1).
     
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  31.  36
    Charles Pigden (2010). Comments on 'Hume's Master Argument'. In Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave Macmillan 128-142.
    This is a commentary on Adrian Heathcote’s interesting paper ‘Hume’s Master Argument’. Heathcote contends that No-Ought-From-Is is primarily a logical thesis, a ban on Is/Ought inferences which Hume derives from the logic of Ockham. NOFI is thus a variation on what Heathcote calls ‘Hume’s Master Argument’, which he also deploys to prove that conclusions about the future (and therefore a-temporal generalizations) cannot be derived by reason from premises about the past, and that conclusions about external objects or (...)
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  32.  53
    Samir Okasha (2005). Does Hume's Argument Against Induction Rest on a Quantifier-Shift Fallacy? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (2):253–271.
    It is widely agreed that Hume's description of human inductive reasoning is inadequate. But many philosophers think that this inadequacy in no way affects the force of Hume's argument for the unjustifiability of inductive reasoning. I argue that this constellation of opinions contains a serious tension, given that Hume was not merely pointing out that induction is fallible. I then explore a recent diagnosis of where Hume's sceptical argument goes wrong, due to Elliott Sober. Sober (...)
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  33.  70
    Noriaki Iwasa (2011). Hume's Alleged Success Over Hutcheson. Synthesis Philosophica 26 (2):323-336.
    David Hume thinks that human affections are naturally partial, while Francis Hutcheson holds that humans originally have disinterested benevolence. Michael Gill argues that Hume's moral theory succeeds over Hutcheson's because the former severs the link between explaining and justifying morality. According to Gill, Hutcheson is wrong to assume that our original nature should be the basis of morality. Gill's understanding of Hutcheson's theory does not fully represent it, since for Hutcheson self-love and self-interest under certain conditions are (...)
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  34.  38
    John Greco (1998). The Force of Hume's Skepticism About Unobserved Matters of Fact. Journal of Philosophical Research 23:289-306.
    According to a popular objection, Hume assumes that only deductive inferences can generate knowledge and reasonable belief, and so Hume’s skepticism can be avoided by simply recognizing the role of inductive inferences in empirical matters. This paper offers an interpretation of Hume’s skepticism that avoids this objection. The resulting skeptical argument is a powerful one in the following sense: it is not at all obvious where the argument goes wrong, and responding to the argument forces us (...)
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  35.  11
    Henrik Bohlin (2013). Universal Moral Standards and the Problem of Cultural Relativism in Hume's ‘A Dialogue’. Philosophy 88 (4):593-606.
    An interpretation and critical re-construction is offered of David Hume's argument on cultural relativism in the essay ‘A Dialogue’ . For any issue of moral disagreement, Hume contends, either one side can be shown right and the other wrong, or imprecision in moral principles leaves room for more than one reasonable view, or the disagreement concerns a morally indifferent aesthetic matter, or it is caused by ‘artificial’ moral sentiments. In each case, relativism is the wrong view. (...)
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  36. Alon Segev (2008). Leaving the “Real Hume” in Peace and Reading the Dialogues From a Moral Perspective. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2).
    This paper offers a new reading of Hume’s much discussed Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779/2000) which shows that, in contrast to what commentators tend to ascribe to Hume, the crux of the text is not epistemological-ontological – that is, not the arguments in favour of and against God’s existence – but moral. It is shown that, although most of the epistemologicalontological pro-and-contra arguments are quite weak, Hume’s interlocutors nevertheless cling to their theses from beginning to end, with (...)
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  37. Dennis C. Rasmussen (2013). The Pragmatic Enlightenment: Recovering the Liberalism of Hume, Smith, Montesquieu, and Voltaire. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the political theory of the Enlightenment, focusing on four leading eighteenth-century thinkers: David Hume, Adam Smith, Montesquieu and Voltaire. Dennis C. Rasmussen calls attention to the particular strand of the Enlightenment these thinkers represent, which he terms the 'pragmatic Enlightenment'. He defends this strand of Enlightenment thought against both the Enlightenment's critics and some of the more idealistic Enlightenment figures who tend to have more followers today, such as John Locke, Immanuel Kant (...)
     
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  38.  27
    Kenneth R. Westphal (2010). From 'Convention' to 'Ethical Life': Hume's Theory of Justice in Post-Kantian Perspective. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):105-132.
    Hume and contemporary Humeans contend that moral sentiments form the sole and sufficient basis of moral judgments. This thesis is criticised by appeal to Hume’s theory of justice, which shows that basic principles of justice are required to form and to maintain society, which is indispensable to human life, and that acting according to, or violating, these principles is right, or wrong, regardless of anyone’s sentiments, motives or character. Furthermore, Hume’s theory of justice shows (...)
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  39.  16
    Michael Welbourne (2002). Is Hume Really a Reductivist? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):407-423.
    Coady misrepresents Hume as a reductivist about testimony. Hume occasionally writes carelessly as if what goes for beliefs based on induction will also go for beliefs obtained from testimony. But, in fact, he has no theory of testimony at all, though in his more considered remarks he rightly thinks, as does Reid, that the natural response to a bit of testimony is simply to accept the information which it contains. The sense in which we owe the beliefs we (...)
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  40.  80
    P. F. Brownsey (1978). Hume and the Social Contract. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):132-148.
    Doubts the adequacy of teh accounts of Humes' successful refutation of the theory of a social contract. Groups Humes' refutation into three arguments: 1) hardly any social contracts are idscernible in the hoistories of actual governments 2) contract theory must be wrong because it conflicts with ordinary people's views on the sunject 3) utilitarian Argues that it is doubtful whether any of these arguments or clusters of arguments really refutes contract theory; certainly, none achieves a refutation of the 'simple (...)
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    Stuart Holland & Teresa Carla Oliveira (2013). Missing Links: Hume, Smith, Kant and Economic Methodology. Economic Thought.
    This paper traces missing links in the history of economic thought. In outlining Hume's concept of 'the reflexive mind' it shows that this opened frontiers between philosophy and psychology which Bertrand Russell denied and which logical positivism in philosophy and positive economics displaced. It relates this to Hume's influence not only on Smith, but also on Schopenhauer and the later Wittgenstein, with parallels in Gestalt psychology and recent findings from neural research and cognitive psychology. It critiques Kant's reaction (...)
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  42.  21
    James P. Sterba (1987). Justifying Morality: The Right and the Wrong Ways. Synthese 72 (1):45 - 69.
    Contemporary philosophers offer three kinds of justification for morality. Some, following plato, claim that morality is justified by self-interest. Others, following hume as he is frequently interpreted, claim that morality is justified in terms of other-regarding interests, wants or intentions that people happen to have. And still others, following kant, claim that morality is justified in terms of the requirements of practical reason. In "the moral point of view" published in 1958 and in a series of articles continuing to (...)
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  43.  28
    James Fieser (1989). Is Hume a Moral Skeptic? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):89-105.
    I will approach this issue by seeing how Hume's moral theory compares to a contemporary standard of moral skepticism. Using J. L. Mackie's analysis of moral skepticism as a point of reference, I will argue that, as a normative theory, Hume's account of morality is not at all skeptical since he is offering a relatively optimistic consequentialist theory of right and wrong action. As a metaethical theory, however, I will argue that Hume is a weak metaethical (...)
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  44.  17
    Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1995). Hume's Pragmaticist Argument for the Reality of God. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 9 (1):1 - 13.
    The author examines Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion to discover a variant of the usual teleological argument that abandons reliance on analogical reasoning. This second version, never refuted in the Dialogues, is termed "pragmaticist" in Peirce's sense. It relies on an abductive hypothesis that claims not logical proof but the power of instinctual conviction. The Dialogues' espousal of sound common sense may then be viewed as an imperfectly articulated precursor of Peirce's pragmaticist argument for the reality rather than the (...)
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  45.  32
    John King-Farlow (1982). Historical Insights on Miracles: Babbage, Hume, Aquinas. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (4):209 - 218.
    CHARLES BABBAGE, OUTSTANDING 19TH CENTURY FIGURE ON THEORY OF COMPUTING, URGES ON PROTO-GOODMANIAN AND NEO-MAIMONIDEAN GROUNDS THAT HUME IS QUITE WRONG ABOUT THE PROBABILITY OF MIRACLES’ OCCURRING. AQUINAS’ CLASSIFICATIONS OF MIRACLES INDICATE THAT NOT SINGLE PROBABILITY JUDGMENT IS ALWAYS RIGHT. BABBAGE’S WORK ON COMPUTING STILL CIRCULATES, BUT HIS NINTH BRIDGEWATER TREATISE (ON MIRACLES) HAS LONG DESERVED REPUBLICATION.
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  46.  16
    Katherin A. Rogers (1991). Hume on Necessary Causal Connections. Philosophy 66 (258):517 - 521.
    According to David Hume our idea of a necessary connection between what we call cause and effect is produced when repeated observation of the conjunction of two events determines the mind to consider one upon the appearance of the other. No matter how we interpret Hume's theory of causation this explanation of the genesis of the idea of necessity is fraught with difficulty. I hope to show, looking at the three major interpretations of Hume's causal theory, that (...)
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  47.  6
    Andrew Lister (2005). Hume and Rawls on the Circumstances and Priority of Justice. History of Political Thought 26 (4):664-695.
    This article addresses a historical puzzle that arises from Sandel's critique of Rawls's use of Hume's 'circumstances of justice', and a related philosophical puzzle about the priority of justice over other values. Sandel questioned whether a remedy for selfishness could be the first virtue. Yet, as Rawls understood, Hume's theory gave justice priority over other personal virtues, and was not incompatible with Rawls's claim that justice was the first virtue of institutions. Rawls was mistaken, however, to think that (...)
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  48. Dario Perinetti (2002). Hume, History and the Science of Human Nature. Dissertation, Mcgill University (Canada)
    This thesis sets out to show that a philosophical reflection on history is, in the strongest possible way, an essential feature of Hume's project of a science of human nature: a philosophical investigation of human nature, for Hume, cannot be successful independently of an understanding of the relation of human beings to their history. Hume intended to criticize traditional metaphysics by referring all knowledge to experience. But it is almost always assumed that Hume means by "experience" (...)
     
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  49. Ira Jay Singer (1990). Hume's Problem: The Opposition Between Philosophy and Common Life. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    Hume raises the issue of how common life and philosophy are related. He presents the possibility that they are irreconcilably opposed, that philosophy rigorously and honestly pursued must lead to skepticism. I discuss some prominent interpretive issues about Hume in light of this opposition between common life and philosophy. I also argue that this opposition is a deep and general philosophical problem, and sketch an approach to this problem. ;These are my interpretive claims: I argue that Hume (...)
     
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  50. Pheroze S. Wadia (1978). Professor Pike on Part III of Hume's Dialogues: PHEROZE S. WADIA. Religious Studies 14 (3):325-342.
    My attention in this paper will be focused almost exclusively on the interpretation of Part III of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion suggested by Professor Nelson Pike at the very close of his excellent recent commentary on that enduring classic. 1 As I will show briefly in Section II below, Pike's interpretation of Part III emerges from the wider context of his quarrel with Kemp Smith in regard to the final outcome of these Dialogues . I find much in (...)
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