Search results for 'Dennis Hume Wrong' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dennis Hume Wrong (1998). The Modern Condition: Essays at Century's End. Stanford University Press.score: 870.0
    In this collection, a leading sociologist brings his distinctive method of social criticism to bear on some of the most significant ideas, political and social events, and thinkers of the late twentieth century. In the first section, the author examines several concepts that have figured prominently in recent political-ideological controversies: capitalism, rationality, totalitarianism, power, alienation, left and right, and cultural relativism/ multiculturalism. He considers their origins, historical shifts in their meaning and the myths surrounding them, and their resonance beyond their (...)
     
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  2. Dennis H. Wrong (1997). Cultural Relativism as Ideology. Critical Review 11 (2):291-300.score: 240.0
    Abstract The concept of culture was originally an expression of German nationalism, which reacted to the French Enlightenment by asserting the uniqueness and incomparability of all cultures as historical creations. This understanding of cultural diversity, which prevailed in American anthropology, is widely understood to imply the moral equality of all cultures. Yet its relativism originally applied to different individuals socialized in the values of their culture, rather than to different cultures. The debate over multiculturalism, which presupposes cultural relativism, ignores this (...)
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  3. Dennis H. Wrong (1999). Digby Baltzell: Sociologist and Critical Celebrant of the Upper Class. Sociological Theory 17 (1):112-116.score: 240.0
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  4. Dennis H. Wrong (2004). Is Capitalism Eternal? Critical Review 16 (1):23-32.score: 240.0
    Abstract Several scholars have observed that in contrast to ?socialism,? ?capitalism? was not an ideology promoted by a social class or movement but an economy that emerged ?spontaneously? from particular historical conditions. Since the decline of the Soviet Union, no new version of socialism has been promulgated, although complaints about the inequalities of capitalism inevitably persist and will certainly continue. Capitalism, if not ?eternal,? remains a highly probable form of economy under conditions of economic surplus, extensive division of labor, urbanism, (...)
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  5. Dennis H. Wrong (1982). A Note on Marx and Weber in Gouldner's Thought. Theory and Society 11 (6):899-905.score: 240.0
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  6. Dennis H. Wrong (forthcoming). Class Fertility Differentials Before 1850. Social Research.score: 240.0
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  7. Dennis H. Wrong (forthcoming). Human Nature and the Perspective of Sociology. Social Research.score: 240.0
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  8. Dennis H. Wrong (2000). Reflections on the Death of Socialism: Changing Perceptions of the State/Society Line. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 29 (2):175-185.score: 240.0
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  9. David Hume, David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2007). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature (1739/40), followed by the short Abstract (1740) in which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh (1745), Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers (...)
     
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  10. David Hume, David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2007). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 2: Editorial Material. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This second volume begins with their 'Historical Account' of the Treatise, an account that runs from the beginnings of the work to the period immediately following Hume's death in 1776, followed by an account of the Nortons' editorial procedures and policies and a record of the differences between the first-edition text of the Treatise and the critical text that follows. The volume (...)
     
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  11. David Hume, Letters of David Hume to William Strahan.score: 180.0
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  12. David Hume (1963). The Philosophy of David Hume. New York, Modern Library.score: 180.0
    My own life.--A treatise of human nature (selections)--An inquiry concerning human understanding (selections)--An inquiry concerning the principles of morals (selections)--Of the standard of taste.--Dialogues concerning natural religion.
     
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  13. David Hume (1979). Hume's Ethical Writings: Selections From David Hume. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 180.0
     
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  14. David Hume (1954/1983). New Letters of David Hume. Garland Pub..score: 180.0
     
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  15. David Hume (1932/1983). The Letters of David Hume. Garland Pub..score: 180.0
     
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  16. J. M. Stafford (1999). Hume on Luxury: A Response to John Dennis? History of Political Thought 20 (4):646-648.score: 144.0
    Hume's essay �Of Luxury� criticizes two extreme and contrasting doctrines: that luxury is always beneficial to society and that it is always baneful. Hume identifies the exponent of the first proposition as Bernard Mandeville in his book The Fable of the Bees, but does not name the second target of his essay. It is most probably John Dennis, one of Mandeville's contemporary critics. The evidence for this is that Hume challenges and contradicts three clearly defined theses (...)
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  17. Laurent Jaffro (2006). What is Wrong with Reid's Criticism of Hume on Moral Approbation? European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):11-26.score: 126.0
    In his Essays on the Active Powers, Thomas Reid criticises <span class='Hi'>Hume</span>'s theory of moral judgment and argues that it is untenable. The aim of this paper is to show that Reid shares more with his target than is ordinarily acknowledged. The author suggests that the opposition between “cognitivism” and “non-cognitivism” concerning the role of feelings in moral judgment tends to obscure (disputable) assumptions held in common by both philosophers about the nature of feelings.
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  18. Philip A. Reed (2012). What's Wrong with Monkish Virtues? Hume on the Standard of Virtue. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (1).score: 120.0
     
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  19. John J. Tilley (2009). Physical Objects and Moral Wrongness: Hume on the "Fallacy" in Wollaston's Moral Theory. Hume Studies 35 (1):87-101.score: 72.0
    According to the moral theory of William Wollaston (1659-1724), the mark of a wrong action is that it signifies a falsehood.1 This theory rests, in part, on an unusual account of actions according to which they have propositional content: they "declare," "signify," "affirm," or "express" propositions (RN 8-13). To take an example from Wollaston, the act of firing on a band of soldiers affirms the proposition "Those soldiers are my enemies" (RN 8-9). Likewise, the act of breaking a promise (...)
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  20. Charles Pigden (2010). Comments on 'Hume's Master Argument'. In , Hume on Is and Ought. Palgrave Macmillan. 128-142.score: 72.0
    This is a commentary on Adrian Heathcote’s interesting paper ‘Hume’s Master Argument’. Heathcote contends that No-Ought-From-Is is primarily a logical thesis, a ban on Is/Ought inferences which Hume derives from the logic of Ockham. NOFI is thus a variation on what Heathcote calls ‘Hume’s Master Argument’, which he also deploys to prove that conclusions about the future (and therefore a-temporal generalizations) cannot be derived by reason from premises about the past, and that conclusions about external objects or (...)
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  21. Noriaki Iwasa (2011). Hume's Alleged Success Over Hutcheson. Synthesis Philosophica 26 (2):323-336.score: 66.0
    David Hume thinks that human affections are naturally partial, while Francis Hutcheson holds that humans originally have disinterested benevolence. Michael Gill argues that Hume's moral theory succeeds over Hutcheson's because the former severs the link between explaining and justifying morality. According to Gill, Hutcheson is wrong to assume that our original nature should be the basis of morality. Gill's understanding of Hutcheson's theory does not fully represent it, since for Hutcheson self-love and self-interest under certain conditions are (...)
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  22. P. F. Brownsey (1978). Hume and the Social Contract. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):132-148.score: 54.0
    Doubts the adequacy of teh accounts of Humes' successful refutation of the theory of a social contract. Groups Humes' refutation into three arguments: 1) hardly any social contracts are idscernible in the hoistories of actual governments 2) contract theory must be wrong because it conflicts with ordinary people's views on the sunject 3) utilitarian Argues that it is doubtful whether any of these arguments or clusters of arguments really refutes contract theory; certainly, none achieves a refutation of the 'simple (...)
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  23. Samir Okasha (2005). Does Hume's Argument Against Induction Rest on a Quantifier-Shift Fallacy? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (2):253–271.score: 54.0
    It is widely agreed that Hume's description of human inductive reasoning is inadequate. But many philosophers think that this inadequacy in no way affects the force of Hume's argument for the unjustifiability of inductive reasoning. I argue that this constellation of opinions contains a serious tension, given that Hume was not merely pointing out that induction is fallible. I then explore a recent diagnosis of where Hume's sceptical argument goes wrong, due to Elliott Sober. Sober (...)
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  24. John King-Farlow (1982). Historical Insights on Miracles: Babbage, Hume, Aquinas. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (4):209 - 218.score: 54.0
    CHARLES BABBAGE, OUTSTANDING 19TH CENTURY FIGURE ON THEORY OF COMPUTING, URGES ON PROTO-GOODMANIAN AND NEO-MAIMONIDEAN GROUNDS THAT HUME IS QUITE WRONG ABOUT THE PROBABILITY OF MIRACLES’ OCCURRING. AQUINAS’ CLASSIFICATIONS OF MIRACLES INDICATE THAT NOT SINGLE PROBABILITY JUDGMENT IS ALWAYS RIGHT. BABBAGE’S WORK ON COMPUTING STILL CIRCULATES, BUT HIS NINTH BRIDGEWATER TREATISE (ON MIRACLES) HAS LONG DESERVED REPUBLICATION.
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  25. Kenneth R. Westphal (2010). From 'Convention' to 'Ethical Life': Hume's Theory of Justice in Post-Kantian Perspective. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):105-132.score: 54.0
    Hume and contemporary Humeans contend that moral sentiments form the sole and sufficient basis of moral judgments. This thesis is criticised by appeal to Hume’s theory of justice, which shows that basic principles of justice are required to form and to maintain society, which is indispensable to human life, and that acting according to, or violating, these principles is right, or wrong, regardless of anyone’s sentiments, motives or character. Furthermore, Hume’s theory of justice shows how the (...)
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  26. James Fieser (1989). Is Hume a Moral Skeptic? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):89-105.score: 54.0
    I will approach this issue by seeing how Hume's moral theory compares to a contemporary standard of moral skepticism. Using J. L. Mackie's analysis of moral skepticism as a point of reference, I will argue that, as a normative theory, Hume's account of morality is not at all skeptical since he is offering a relatively optimistic consequentialist theory of right and wrong action. As a metaethical theory, however, I will argue that Hume is a weak metaethical (...)
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  27. John Greco (1998). The Force of Hume's Skepticism About Unobserved Matters of Fact. Journal of Philosophical Research 23:289-306.score: 54.0
    According to a popular objection, Hume assumes that only deductive inferences can generate knowledge and reasonable belief, and so Hume’s skepticism can be avoided by simply recognizing the role of inductive inferences in empirical matters. This paper offers an interpretation of Hume’s skepticism that avoids this objection. The resulting skeptical argument is a powerful one in the following sense: it is not at all obvious where the argument goes wrong, and responding to the argument forces us (...)
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  28. Michael Welbourne (2002). Is Hume Really a Reductivist? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):407-423.score: 54.0
    Coady misrepresents Hume as a reductivist about testimony. Hume occasionally writes carelessly as if what goes for beliefs based on induction will also go for beliefs obtained from testimony. But, in fact, he has no theory of testimony at all, though in his more considered remarks he rightly thinks, as does Reid, that the natural response to a bit of testimony is simply to accept the information which it contains. The sense in which we owe the beliefs we (...)
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  29. Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1995). Hume's Pragmaticist Argument for the Reality of God. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 9 (1):1 - 13.score: 54.0
    The author examines Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion to discover a variant of the usual teleological argument that abandons reliance on analogical reasoning. This second version, never refuted in the Dialogues, is termed "pragmaticist" in Peirce's sense. It relies on an abductive hypothesis that claims not logical proof but the power of instinctual conviction. The Dialogues' espousal of sound common sense may then be viewed as an imperfectly articulated precursor of Peirce's pragmaticist argument for the reality rather than the (...)
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  30. James P. Sterba (1987). Justifying Morality: The Right and the Wrong Ways. Synthese 72 (1):45 - 69.score: 54.0
    Contemporary philosophers offer three kinds of justification for morality. Some, following plato, claim that morality is justified by self-interest. Others, following hume as he is frequently interpreted, claim that morality is justified in terms of other-regarding interests, wants or intentions that people happen to have. And still others, following kant, claim that morality is justified in terms of the requirements of practical reason. In "the moral point of view" published in 1958 and in a series of articles continuing to (...)
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  31. Andrew Lister (2005). Hume and Rawls on the Circumstances and Priority of Justice. History of Political Thought 26 (4):664-695.score: 54.0
    This article addresses a historical puzzle that arises from Sandel's critique of Rawls's use of Hume's 'circumstances of justice', and a related philosophical puzzle about the priority of justice over other values. Sandel questioned whether a remedy for selfishness could be the first virtue. Yet, as Rawls understood, Hume's theory gave justice priority over other personal virtues, and was not incompatible with Rawls's claim that justice was the first virtue of institutions. Rawls was mistaken, however, to think that (...)
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  32. Alon Segev (2008). Leaving the “Real Hume” in Peace and Reading the Dialogues From a Moral Perspective. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2).score: 54.0
    This paper offers a new reading of Hume’s much discussed Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779/2000) which shows that, in contrast to what commentators tend to ascribe to Hume, the crux of the text is not epistemological-ontological – that is, not the arguments in favour of and against God’s existence – but moral. It is shown that, although most of the epistemologicalontological pro-and-contra arguments are quite weak, Hume’s interlocutors nevertheless cling to their theses from beginning to end, with (...)
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  33. Monique Wonderly (2008). A Humean Approach to Assessing the Moral Significance of Ultra-Violent Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):1-10.score: 48.0
  34. Charles R. Pigden (2009). If Not Non-Cognitivism, Then What? In , Hume on Motivation and Virtue. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
    Taking my cue from Michael Smith, I try to extract a decent argument for non-cognitivism from the text of the Treatise. I argue that the premises are false and that the whole thing rests on a petitio principi. I then re-jig the argument so as to support that conclusion that Hume actually believed (namely that an action is virtuous if it would excite the approbation of a suitably qualified spectator). This argument too rests on false premises and a begged (...)
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  35. Dennis M. Ahern (1975). Hume on the Evidential Impossibility of Miracles. American Philosophical Quarterly:1 - 31.score: 42.0
    THE ESSAY "OF MIRACLES," IN ADDITION TO BEING ONE OF THE MOST PROVOKING SECTIONS OF HUME’S WRITINGS, IS ALSO ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY MISUNDERSTOOD. HUME CLAIMS HIS ARGUMENT IS SIMILAR TO AN ARGUMENT OF ARCHBISHOP TILLOTSON, AND I EXPLORE THE PARALLEL BETWEEN THE TWO ARGUMENTS IN DETAIL. FUNDAMENTAL TO BOTH IS THE CONCEPT OF EVIDENTIAL IMPOSSIBILITY: A PROPOSITION, P, IS EVIDENTIALLY IMPOSSIBLE IF AND ONLY IF ALLEGED EVIDENCE FOR THE TRUTH OF P WOULD NOT BE EVIDENCE FOR (...)
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  36. John R. Bowlin (2000). Sieges, Shipwrecks, and Sensible Knaves: Justice and Utility in Butler and Hume. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):253 - 280.score: 38.0
    By examining the theories of justice developed by Joseph Butler and David Hume, the author discloses the conceptual limits of their moral naturalism. Butler was unable to accommodate the possibility that justice is, at least to some extent, a social convention. Hume, who more presciently tried to spell out the conventional character of justice, was unable to carry through that project within the framework of his moral naturalism. These limits have gone unnoticed, largely because Butler and Hume (...)
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  37. J. L. Mackie (1977). Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong. Penguin.score: 36.0
    John Mackie's stimulating book is a complete and clear treatise on moral theory. His writings on normative ethics-the moral principles he recommends-offer a fresh approach on a much neglected subject, and the work as a whole is undoubtedly a major contribution to modern philosophy.The author deals first with the status of ethics, arguing that there are not objective values, that morality cannot be discovered but must be made. He examines next the content of ethics, seeing morality as a functional device, (...)
     
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  38. Paul Russell (2006). Moral Sense and Virtue in Hume's Ethics. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    “This constant habit of surveying ourselves, as it were, in reflection, keeps alive all the sentiments of right and wrong, and begets, in noble natures, a certain reverence for themselves as well as others, which is the surest guardian of every virtue.”.
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  39. Steven D. Hales (1994). Certainty and Phenomenal States. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):57-72.score: 36.0
    If we agree, along with Arnauld, Berkeley, Descartes, Hume, Leibniz, and others that our occurrent phenomenal states serve as sources of epistemic certainty for us, we need some explanation of this fact. Many contemporary writers, most notably Roderick Chisholm, maintain that there is something special about the phenomenal states themselves that allows our certain knowledge of them. I argue that Chisholm's view is both wrong and irreparable, and that the capacity of humans to know these states with certainty (...)
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  40. Dennis Temple (1992). Hume's Logical Objection to the Argument From Design Based on the Uniqueness of the Universe. Religious Studies 28 (1):19 - 30.score: 36.0
  41. Dennis E. Bradford (1983). Hume on Existence. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (3):1-12.score: 36.0
  42. Ted Honderich, Dennis O'Keeffe, Jan Lester, Tony McWalter & Kate Soper (2000). Left and Right, Right and Wrong. The Philosophers' Magazine 9 (9):37-41.score: 36.0
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  43. Dennis Temple (1984). Modal Reasoning in Hume's Billiard Ball Argument. History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (2):203 - 211.score: 36.0
  44. Dennis Rohatyn (1983). Hume's Dialectical Conceits: The Case of Dialogue XII. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (4):519-532.score: 36.0
  45. Dennis L. Sansom (2011). Truth and the World: Why Davidson Is Right and Rorty Is Wrong. Philosophy Study 1 (1):67-76.score: 36.0
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  46. Earl W. Spurgin (2004). Looking for Answers in All the Wrong Places. Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):293-313.score: 36.0
    In recent years, many business ethicists have raised problems with the “ethics pays” credo. Despite these problems, many continue to hold it. I argue that support for the credo leads business ethicists away from a potentially fruitful approach found in Hume’s moral philosophy. I begin by demonstrating that attempts to support the credo fail because proponents are trying to provide an answer to the “Why be moral?” question that is based on rational self-interest. Then, I show that Hume’s (...)
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  47. Brendan Shea (2010). Three Ways of Getting It Wrong: Induction in Wonderland. In Richard Brian Davis (ed.), Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy: Curiouser and Curiouser. Wiley Blackwell. 93-107.score: 36.0
    Alice encounters at least three distinct problems in her struggles to understand and navigate Wonderland. The first arises when she attempts to predict what will happen in Wonderland based on what she has experienced outside of Wonderland. In many cases, this proves difficult -- she fails to predict that babies might turn into pigs, that a grin could survive without a cat or that playing cards could hold criminal trials. Alice's second problem involves her efforts to figure out the basic (...)
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  48. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2010). A Powerful Theory of Causation. In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge. 143--159.score: 28.0
    Hume thought that if you believed in powers, you believed in necessary connections in nature. He was then able to argue that there were none such because anything could follow anything else. But Hume wrong-footed his opponents. A power does not necessitate its manifestations: rather, it disposes towards them in a way that is less than necessary but more than purely contingent. -/- In this paper a dispositional theory of causation is offered. Causes dispose towards their effects (...)
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  49. Constantine Sandis (2009). Hume and the Debate on 'Motivating Reasons'. In Charles Pigden (ed.), Hume on Motivation and Virtue. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 27.0
    This paper argues for a novel interpretation of Hume's account of motivation, according to which beliefs can (alone) motivate action though not by standing as reasons which normatively favour it. It si then suggested that a number of contemporary debates about concerning the nature of reasons for action could benefit from such an approach.
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  50. David Owen (2009). Hume and the Mechanics of Mind : Impressions, Ideas, and Association. In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.score: 27.0
    Hume introduced important innovations concerning the theory of ideas. The two most important are the distinction between impressions and ideas, and the use he made of the principles of association in explaining mental phenomena. Hume divided the perceptions of the mind into two classes. The members of one class, impressions, he held to have a greater degree of force and vivacity than the members of the other class, ideas. He also supposed that ideas are causally dependent copies of (...)
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