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  1. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Arthur Schopenhauer: On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason and Other Writings. Edited, Introduced and Translated by David Cartwright, Edward Erdmann and Christopher Janaway. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 66 (2):206-208.
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  2. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Allen Wood, Songsuk Susan Hahn (Eds.): The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790–1870). Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 66 (3):322-325.
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  3. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Metaxological 'Yes' and Existential 'No': William Desmond and Atheism. Sophia 52 (4):637-655.
    This article explores and critically assesses the metaxological account of a philosophy of God professed by William Desmond. Postmodern reflection on the philosophy of God has a tendency to focus on the 'signs' of God and urges for a passive acceptance of these signs. Desmond argues, contrary to this tendency, for a mindful togetherness of philosophical activity and religious passivity. After exploring Desmond's thought on this topic, I move to assess his 'metaxological yes' to God as the agapeic origin from (...)
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  4. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Oliver Sensen (Ed.): Kant on Moral Autonomy. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 66 (3):326-329.
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  5. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Poverty of Philosophy. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3):411-432.
    Recently, William Desmond’s metaxological philosophy has been gaining popularity since it proposes a powerful counterweight to the dominance of deconstruction in certain areas of contemporary philosophy of religion. This paper serves to introduce Desmond’s philosophy and confront it with one specific form of Postmodern theology, namely John Caputo’s “weak theology.” Since Desmond’s philosophy is—while thought-provoking and refreshing—not well known, a substantial part of this paper is devoted to fleshing out its central concepts: perplexity, metaxology, and hyperbolic indirection. Afterwards, I argue (...)
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  6. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). Erratum To: The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):135-135.
    Erratum to: The lutheran influence on Kant’s depraved will Content Type Journal Article Category Erratum Pages 1-1 DOI 10.1007/s11153-012-9344-7 Authors Dennis Vanden Auweele, Hoger Instituut voor Wijsbegeerte, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Lesagestraat 43, 1820 Steenokkerzeel, Belgium Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047.
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  7. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):117-134.
    Contemporary Kant-scholarship has a tendency to allign Kant’s understanding of depravity closer to Erasmus than Luther in their famous debate on the freedom of the will (1520–1527). While, at face value, some paragraphs do warrant such a claim, I will argue that Kant’s understanding of the radical evil will draws closer to Luther than Erasmus in a number of elements. These elements are (1) the intervention of the Wille for progress towards the good, (2) a positive choice for evil, (3) (...)
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  8. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2012). The Enduring Relevance of Kant's Analysis of (Radical) Evil. Bijdragen 73 (2):121-142.
  9. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2010). Atheism, Radical Evil, and Kant. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):155-176.
    This paper investigates the link between (radical) evil and the existence of God. Arguing with contemporary atheist thinkers, such as Richard Dawkins and Victor Stenger, I hold that one can take the existence of evil as a sign of the existence of God rather than its opposite. The work of Immanuel Kant, especially his thought on evil, is a fertile source to enliven this intuition. Kant implicitly seems to argue that because man is unable to overcome evil by himself, there (...)
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