Search results for 'Dependency care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elke I. Mertens, Ruud J. G. Halfens, Ekkehart Dietz, Ramona Scheufele & Theo Dassen (2008). Pressure Ulcer Risk Screening in Hospitals and Nursing Homes with a General Nursing Assessment Tool: Evaluation of the Care Dependency Scale. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):1018-1025.score: 120.0
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  2. Tube Feeding in Elderly Care (2002). Partv Tube Feeding in Elderly Care. In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press.score: 100.0
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  3. Asha Bhandary (2010). Dependency in Justice: Can Rawlsian Liberalism Accommodate Kittay's Dependency Critique? Hypatia 25 (1):140-156.score: 84.0
    This essay assess the compatibility of Eva Kittay's dependency critique with Rawlsian political liberalism. I argue for the inclusion of a modified version of Kittay's revisions within Rawlsian theory in order to yield a theory that suppports a substantial subset of dependency work. Beyond these selected changes, however, I argue that Kittay's other proposed changes should not be included because they are incompatible with Rawls, and furthermore, their incorporation does not yield a theory that includes utter dependents.
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  4. Eva Feder Kittay, Bruce Jennings & Angela A. Wasunna (2005). Dependency, Difference and the Global Ethic of Longterm Care. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (4):443-469.score: 72.0
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  5. Peta Bowden (2003). Eva Feder Kittay and Ellen K. Feder, Eds., The Subject of Care: Feminist Perspectives on Dependency Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (5):345-347.score: 72.0
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  6. Eva Feder Kittay with Bruce Jennings & Angela A. Wasunna (2005). Dependency, Difference and the Global Ethic of Longterm Care. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (4):443–469.score: 72.0
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  7. Sandra Sullivan-Dunbar (2013). Gratuity, Embodiment, and Reciprocity. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):254-279.score: 72.0
    Protestant Christian ethicist Timothy Jackson and secular feminist philosopher Eva Feder Kittay each explore the relationship between love or care and justice through the lens of human dependency. Jackson sharply prioritizes agape over justice, whereas Kittay articulates a more complex and integrated understanding of the relationship of care and distributive justice. An account of Christian love and its relation to justice must account for the gratuity, mutuality, and reciprocity that pervade human existence. Such an account must integrate (...)
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  8. Ellen Freeberg (2004). The Subject of Care: Feminist Perspectives on Dependency. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):358.score: 72.0
  9. Elin Palm (2012). A Declaration of Healthy Dependence: The Case of Home Care. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-20.score: 64.0
    Aging populations have become a major concern in the developed world and are expected to require novel care strategies. Public policies, health-care regimes and technology developers alike stress the need for a more individualized care to meet the increased demand for care services in response to demographic change. Increasingly, care services are offered to individuals with diseases and or disabilities in their homes by means of Personalized Health-Monitoring (PHM) technologies. PHM-based home care is typically (...)
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  10. Eva Feder Kittay (2011). The Ethics of Care, Dependence, and Disability. Ratio Juris 24 (1):49-58.score: 60.0
    According to the most important theories of justice, personal dignity is closely related to independence, and the care that people with disabilities receive is seen as a way for them to achieve the greatest possible autonomy. However, human beings are naturally subject to periods of dependency, and people without disabilities are only “temporarily abled.” Instead of seeing assistance as a limitation, we consider it to be a resource at the basis of a vision of society that is able (...)
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  11. Anke D. J. Smeenk & Henk A. M. J. ten Have (2003). Medicalization and Obstetric Care: An Analysis of Developments in Dutch Midwifery. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (2):153-165.score: 60.0
    The Dutch system of obstetric care is often recommended for midwife-attended births, the high number of home deliveries, and the low rate of intervention during pregnancy and labour. In this contribution, the question is addressed whether processes of medicalization can be demonstrated in the Dutch midwife practice. Medicalization of pregnancy and childbirth is often criticized because it creates dependency on the medical system and infringement of the autonomy of pregnant women. It is concluded that medicalization is present in (...)
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  12. Helga Varden (2012). A Kantian Critique of the Care Tradition: Family Law and Systemic Justice. Kantian Review 17 (2):327-356.score: 54.0
    Liberal theories of justice have been rightly criticized for two things by care theorists. First, they have failed to deal with private care relations’ inherent (inter)dependency, asymmetry and particularity. Second, they have been shown unable properly to address the asymmetry and dependency constitutive of care workers’ and care-receivers’ systemic conditions. I apply Kant’s theory of right to show that current care theories unfortunately reproduce similar problems because also they argue on the assumption that (...)
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  13. Susan Dodds (2007). Depending on Care: Recognition of Vulnerability and the Social Contribution of Care Provision. Bioethics 21 (9):500–510.score: 50.0
  14. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Welfare, Work Requirements, and Dependant-Care. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):243-256.score: 48.0
    the arguments in their favour are weak. Arguments based on reciprocity fail to explain why only means-tested public benefits should be subject to work requirements, and why unpaid dependant care work should not count as satisfying citizens’ obligations to reciprocate. Argu- ments based on promoting the work ethic misattribute recipients’ nonwork to deviant values, when their core problem is finding steady employment consistent with supporting a family and meeting dependant care responsibilities. Rigid work requirements impose unreasonable costs on (...)
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  15. Janice J. Miller, Bette Ann Stead & Arun Pereira (1991). Dependent Care and the Workplace: An Analysis of Management and Employee Perceptions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (11):863 - 869.score: 48.0
    This study attempts to identify differences in the perceptions of top management (defined as CEOs, directors, and presidents) and employees (defined as middle and supervisory management) regarding (a) the effects of dependent care responsibilities on job performance, and (b) the extent of a firm's responsibility in providing support for those faced with caring needs concerning eldercare, childcare, substance abuse, and mental/physical handicaps.The results indicate that these two groups have significantly different perceptions of the effect of dependent care responsibilities (...)
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  16. Luiz Gustavo Silva Souza & Luciene Bittencourt Pinheiro (2012). Oficinas terapêuticas em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial - álcool e drogas. Aletheia 38:219-227.score: 48.0
    São descritas Oficinas Terapêuticas conduzidas por psicólogos em um Centro de Atenção Psicossocial – álcool e drogas, direcionadas a adultos de ambos os sexos, usuários de álcool e/ou outras drogas. Seus objetivos principais eram proporcionar espaços de expressão, construção e transformação subjeti..
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  17. Samuel A. Butler (2011). A Fourth Subject Position of Care. Hypatia 27 (2):390-406.score: 42.0
    Analyses of care work typically speak of three necessary roles of care: the care worker, the care recipient, and an economic provider who makes care materially possible. This model provides no place for addressing the difficult political questions care poses for liberal representative democracy. I propose to fill this space with a new caring role to connect the care unit to the political sphere, as the economic provider connects the care unit to (...)
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  18. Joseph Kupfer (2007). Gandhi and the Virtue of Care. Hypatia 22 (3):1 - 21.score: 42.0
    The film Gandhi expands our understanding of how the virtue of care can function in the public sphere by portraying Gandhi dealing with Indian independence from Britain, the subjugation of women and Untouchables, and strife between Hindus and Muslims. Gandhi illustrates in his social and political activism how the virtue of care is animated by benevolence and structured by the building blocks of the care perspective: responsibility and need, relationship and mutual dependency, context and narrative.
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  19. Rosemarie Tong (2002). Love's Labor in the Health Care System: Working Toward Gender Equity. Hypatia 17 (3):200 - 213.score: 42.0
    In this commentary on Eva Feder Kittay's Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality, and Dependency, I focus on Kittay's dependency theory. I apply this theory to an analysis of women's inadequate access to high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. I conclude that while quandaries remain unresolved, including getting men to do their share of dependency work, Kittay's book is an important and original contribution to feminist healthcare ethics and the development of a normative feminist ethic of care.
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  20. R. H. J. Ter Meulen (2008). The Lost Voice: How Libertarianism and Consumerism Obliterate the Need for a Relational Ethics in the National Health Care Service. Christian Bioethics 14 (1):78-94.score: 42.0
    This article analyzes the contribution Christian ethics might be able to make to the ethical debate on policy and caregiving in health and social care in the United Kingdom. The article deals particularly with the concepts of solidarity and subsidiarity which are essential in Christian social ethics and health care ethics, and which may be relevant for the ethical debate on health and social caregiving in the United Kingdom. An important argument in the article is that utilitarian and (...)
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  21. Martha Holstein (2013). A Looming Dystopia: Feminism, Aging, and Community-Based Long-Term Care. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):6-35.score: 42.0
    Any real society is a caregiving and a care receiving society and we must therefore discover ways of coping with these facts of human neediness and dependency that are compatible with the self-respect of the recipients and do not exploit the caregivers. Remember the old Beatles’ refrain—will you still need me, will you still feed me when I’m 64? But what if I need you when I’m 84? What if I have congestive heart failure and arthritis and can (...)
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  22. Sigal Ben-Porath (2008). Care Ethics and Dependence— Rethinking Jus Post Bellum. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 61-71.score: 40.0
    In this essay, Ben-Porath begins from the assumption that just war theory should be extended to include a jus post bellum component. Postwar conduct should be significantly informed by a care ethics perspective, particularly its political aspects as developed by Joan Tronto and others. Care ethics should be extended to the international postwar arena with one significant amendment, namely, weakening the aim of ending dependence.
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  23. Christine E. Sheffer, Claudia P. Barone & Michael E. Anders (2009). Training Health Care Providers in the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence: Pre‐ and Post‐Training Results. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (4):607-613.score: 38.0
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  24. Tove Pettersen (2010). Acting for Others: Moral Ontology in Simone de Beauvoir's Pyrrhus and Cineas. Simone de Beauvoir Studies 26 (2009-2010).score: 36.0
    There are prominent resemblances between issues addressed by Simone de Beauvoir in her early essay on moral philosophy, Pyrrhus and Cineas (1944), and issues attracting the attention of contemporary feminist ethicists, especially those concerned with the ethics of care. They include a focus on relationships, interaction, and mutual dependency. Both emphasize concrete ethical challenges rooted in everyday life, such as those affecting parents and children. Both are critical of the level of abstraction and insensitivity to the situation of (...)
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  25. Ruth M. Mestre I. Mestre (2011). La ciudadanía de las mujeres: El espacio de las necesidades a la Luz Del derecho antidiscriminatorio Y la participación política. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 45:147-166.score: 36.0
    The actual “crisis of care” in western societies highlights the limits of a sex/gender based citizenship and the persistence of the subordination of women. The fact that women are responsible for the provision of care in domestic units has never been a matter of difference but a matter of subordination against which we have developed legal strategies, such as anti-discrimination law, and political strategies, such as increasing the presence of women in decision-making. The paper shows some of these (...)
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  26. Marit Helene Hem & Tove Pettersen (2011). Mature Care and Nursing in Psychiatry: Notions Regarding Reciprocity in Asymmetric Professional Relationships. Health Care Analysis 19 (1):65-76.score: 34.0
    The idea behind this article is to discuss the importance and to develop the concept of reciprocity in asymmetric professional relationships. As an empirical starting point for an examination of the possible forms of reciprocity between patients and nurses in psychiatry, we chose two qualitative in-depth interviews with two different patients. The manners in which these two patients relate to medical personnel—one is dependent, the other is independent—show that this presents challenges to nurses. The theoretical context is provided by the (...)
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  27. Rein Vos, Rob Houtepen & Klasien Horstman (2002). Evidence-Based Medicine and Power Shifts in Health Care Systems. Health Care Analysis 10 (3):319-328.score: 34.0
    It is important and urgent to question therelationship between evidence-based medicineand power shifts in health care systems.Although definitions of EBM are phrased as ascientific approach to medicine, EBM is anormative concept: it aims to improve medicineand health care. Both proponents and opponentsuse a normative concept. More particularly,they provide particular views on positions,responsibilities, possibilities, norms andrelationships between professionals, patientgroups, governments and other parties in healthcare and society. From this perspective, wewant to analyse the role of EBM in modernwestern societies. (...)
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  28. Michael C. Dunn, Isabel C. H. Clare & Anthony J. Holland (2008). Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (1):52-64.score: 34.0
    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide this (...)
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  29. Ursula Naue (2008). 'Self-Care Without a Self': Alzheimer's Disease and the Concept of Personal Responsibility for Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):315-324.score: 34.0
    The article focuses on the impact of the concept of self-care on persons who are understood as incapable of self-care due to their physical and/or mental ‘incapacity’. The article challenges the idea of this health care concept as empowerment and highlights the difficulties for persons who do not fit into this concept. To exemplify this, the self-care concept is discussed with regard to persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the case of persons with AD, self-care (...)
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  30. Sabine Beck, Andreas van de Loo & Stella Reiter-Theil (2008). A “Little Bit Illegal”? Withholding and Withdrawing of Mechanical Ventilation in the Eyes of German Intensive Care Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):7-16.score: 34.0
    Research questions and backgroundThis study explores a highly controversial issue of medical care in Germany: the decision to withhold or withdraw mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. It analyzes difficulties in making these decisions and the physicians’ uncertainty in understanding the German terminology of Sterbehilfe, which is used in the context of treatment limitation. Used in everyday language, the word Sterbehilfe carries connotations such as helping the patient in the dying process or helping the patient to enter the dying (...)
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  31. Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). E-Care as Craftsmanship: Virtuous Work, Skilled Engagement, and Information Technology in Health Care. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):807-816.score: 34.0
    Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds (...)
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  32. Eric Molleman, Manda Broekhuis, Renee Stoffels & Frans Jaspers (2008). How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals. Health Care Analysis 16 (4):329-341.score: 34.0
    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have analyzed the impact of these two types of cooperation on perceived professional autonomy. Two teams were studied, one team dealing with geriatric patients and another treating oncology patients. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews, studied written documents, held informal discussions and (...)
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  33. Adenekan Oyefeso, Carmel Clancy & Hamid Ghodse (1998). Developing a Quality of Care Index for Outpatient Methadone Treatment Programmes. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (1):39-47.score: 32.0
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  34. Amanda Sharkey & Noel Sharkey (2012). Granny and the Robots: Ethical Issues in Robot Care for the Elderly. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):27-40.score: 30.0
    The growing proportion of elderly people in society, together with recent advances in robotics, makes the use of robots in elder care increasingly likely. We outline developments in the areas of robot applications for assisting the elderly and their carers, for monitoring their health and safety, and for providing them with companionship. Despite the possible benefits, we raise and discuss six main ethical concerns associated with: (1) the potential reduction in the amount of human contact; (2) an increase in (...)
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  35. Eva Feder Kittay (1995). Taking Dependency Seriously: The Family and Medical Leave Act Considered in Light of the Social Organization of Dependency Work and Gender Equality. Hypatia 10 (1):8 - 29.score: 30.0
    Contemporary industrialized societies have been confronted with the fact and consequences of women's increased participation in paid employment. Whether this increase has resulted from women's desire for equality or from changing economic circumstances, women and men have been faced with a crisis in the organization of work that concerns dependents, that is, those unable to care for themselves. This is labor that has been largely unpaid, often unrecognized, and yet is indispensable to human society.
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  36. G. J. Teunissen, M. A. Visse & T. A. Abma (2013). Struggling Between Strength and Vulnerability, a Patients' Counter Story. Health Care Analysis:1-18.score: 30.0
    Currently, patients are expected to take control over their health and their life and act as independent users and consumers. Simultaneously, health care policy demands patients are expected to self manage their disease. This article critically questions whether this is a realistic expectation. The paper presents the auto-ethnographic narrative of the first author, which spans a period of 27 years, from 1985 to 2012. In total nine episodes were extracted from various notes, conversations and discussions in an iterative process. (...)
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  37. Heather Peters, Jo-Anne Fiske, Dawn Hemingway, Anita Vaillancourt, Christina McLennan, Barb Keith & Anne Burrill (2010). Interweaving Caring and Economics in the Context of Place: Experiences of Northern and Rural Women Caregivers. Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):172-187.score: 30.0
    While caregiving in northern, rural and remote communities takes place in the context of conditions unique to smaller communities, caregivers live with social policies that are shaped by urban norms rather than rural realities. In times of economic decline and government cuts rural issues of limited services and infrastructure as well as dependency on a single industry can lead to unemployment, community and family instability, and a decline in health and well-being. During these times caregivers face increased pressure to (...)
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  38. Paulius Čelkis & Eglė Venckienė (2011). Concept of the Right to Health Care. Jurisprudence 18 (1):269-286.score: 30.0
    On the grounds of the fundamental value of the human rights, which is the human dignity, this article describes a basis of the right to health care in terms of quality, discloses its concept, reviews the spheres of health system in which this right is exercised: health care and public health. The right to health care is stressed as one of the fundamental rights, without which the person will not able to enjoy other rights: economic, political and (...)
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  39. A. Magdalena Hurtado, Kim Hill, Ines Hurtado & Hillard Kaplan (1992). Trade-Offs Between Female Food Acquisition and Child Care Among Hiwi and Ache Foragers. Human Nature 3 (3):185-216.score: 30.0
    Even though female food acquisition is an area of considerable interest in hunter-gatherer research, the ecological determinants of women’s economic decisions in these populations are still poorly understood. The literature on female foraging behavior indicates that there is considerable variation within and across foraging societies in the amount of time that women spend foraging and in the amount and types of food that they acquire. It is possible that this heterogeneity reflects variation in the trade-offs between time spent in food (...)
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  40. J. P. Bishop (2012). Families, Dependencies, and the Moral Ground of Health Savings Accounts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):513-525.score: 30.0
    Health Savings Accounts have been marginalized in the West. In Singapore, however, they are foundational to the financing of health care. In this brief essay, I shall begin to sketch a justification for Health Savings Accounts. The family has always been thought of as a mere prolegomena to the polis and to be primarily about securing the goods of material life: food, shelter, intimacy. I shall first explore the recent scientific literature on the communal nature of human thriving and (...)
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  41. James Phillips (2002). Managed Care's Reconstruction of Human Existence: The Triumph of Technical Reason. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):339-358.score: 30.0
    To achieve its goals of managing andrestricting access to psychiatric care, managedcare organizations rely on an instrument, theoutpatient treatment report, that carriessignificant implications about how they viewpsychiatric patients and psychiatric care. Inaddition to involving ethical transgressionssuch as violation of patient confidentiality,denial of access to care, spurious use ofconcepts like quality of care, and harassmentof practitioners, the managed care approachalso depends on an overly technical,instrumental interpretation of human beings andpsychiatric treatment. It is this grounding ofmanaged (...) in technical reason that I willexplore in this study. I begin with a reviewof a typical outpatient treatment report andshow how, with its dependence on the DSM-IV,on behavioral symptoms and patient`functioning'', on the biomedical model ofpsychiatric illness, and on gross quantitativemeasures, the report results in a crude,skeletonized view of the human being as acongeries of behavioral symptoms and functions. I then develop the managed care construal ofhuman existence further by showing itsgrounding in technical reason, exploring thelatter in its modern embodiment and deriving itand its opposite, practical reason, fromAristotle''s distinction between technical andpractical reason, techne and phronesis. Inthis analysis of the role of technical reasonin managed care, I point out that managed caredid not have to develop its rationale de novobut could rather lift its arguments, e.g. thebiomedical model, from contemporary psychiatryand simply apply them in a restrictive manner. Finally, I conclude this study by arguing forpsychiatry''s status as a discipline ofpractical knowledge. (shrink)
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  42. Wilfred Chiu & Donna Wilson (1996). Resolving the Ethical Dilemma of Nurse Managers Over Chemically-Dependent Colleagues. Nursing Ethics 3 (4):285-293.score: 30.0
    This paper addresses the nurse manager's role regarding chemically-dependent nurses in the workplace. The manager may intervene by: terminating the contract of the impaired colleague; notifying a disciplinary committee; consulting with a counselling committee; or referring the impaired nurse to an employee assistance programme. A dilemma may arise about which of these interventions is ethically the best. The ethical theories relevant to nursing involve ethical relativism, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, Kohlberg's justice, and Gilligan's ethic of care. Nurse managers first need (...)
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  43. Ruud ter Meulen & Katharine Wright (2012). Family Solidarity and Informal Care: The Case of Care for People with Dementia. Bioethics 26 (7):361-368.score: 30.0
    According to Bayertz the core meaning of solidarity is the perception of mutual obligations between the members of a community. This definition leaves open the various ways solidarity is perceived by individuals in different communities and how it manifests itself in a particular community. This paper explores solidarity as manifested in the context of families in respect of caregiving for a family member who has become dependent because of disease or illness. Though family caregiving is based on the same perception (...)
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  44. Susan Dodds (2013). Dependence, Care, and Vulnerability. In Catriona Mackenzie, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds (eds.), Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. Oup Usa. 181.score: 30.0
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  45. ElizabethAnderson (2004). Welfare, Work Requirements, and Dependant-Care. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):243–256.score: 30.0
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  46. Igor A. Harsch, Andrea Schuller, Eckhart G. Hahn & Johannes Hensen (2010). Cortisone Replacement Therapy in Endocrine Disorders – Quality of Self‐Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):492-498.score: 30.0
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  47. Tineke Abma, Anne Bruijn, Tinie Kardol, Jos Schols & Guy Widdershoven (2012). Responsibilities in Elderly Care: Mr Powell's Narrative of Duty and Relations. Bioethics 26 (1):22-31.score: 28.0
    In Western countries a considerable number of older people move to a residential home when their health declines. Institutionalization often results in increased dependence, inactivity and loss of identity or self-worth (dignity). This raises the moral question as to how older, institutionalized people can remain autonomous as far as continuing to live in line with their own values is concerned. Following Walker's meta-ethical framework on the assignment of responsibilities, we suggest that instead of directing all older people towards more autonomy (...)
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  48. Gunnar Björnsson (2007). How Effects Depend on Their Causes, Why Causal Transitivity Fails, and Why We Care About Causation. Philosophical Studies 133 (3):349 - 390.score: 26.0
    Despite recent efforts to improve on counterfactual theories of causation, failures to explain how effects depend on their causes are still manifest in a variety of cases. In particular, theories that do a decent job explaining cases of causal preemption have problems accounting for cases of causal intransitivity. Moreover, the increasing complexity of the counterfactual accounts makes it difficult to see why the concept of causation would be such a central part of our cognition. In this paper, I propose an (...)
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  49. Nancy S. Jecker (2002). Taking Care of One's Own: Justice and Family Caregiving. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2):117-133.score: 26.0
    This paper asks whether adult children have aduty of justice to act as caregivers for theirfrail, elderly parents. I begin (Sections I.and II.) by locating the historical reasons whyrelationships within families were not thoughtto raise issues of justice. I argue that thesereasons are misguided. The paper next presentsspecific examples showing the relevance ofjustice to family relationships. I point outthat in the United States today, the burden ofcaregiving for dependent parents fallsdisproportionately on women (Sections III. andIV.). The paper goes on to (...)
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