Search results for 'Depicting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas Bittner, Maureen Donnelly & Barry Smith (2004). Endurants and Perdurants in Directly Depicting Ontologies. AI Communications 13 (4):247–258.score: 12.0
    We propose an ontological theory that is powerful enough to describe both complex spatio-temporal processes and the enduring entities that participate therein. For this purpose we introduce the notion a directly depicting ontology. Directly depicting ontologies are based on relatively simple languages and fall into two major categories: ontologies of type SPAN and ontologies of type SNAP. These represent two complementary perspectives on reality and employ distinct though compatible systems of categories. A SNAP (snapshot) ontology comprehends enduring entities (...)
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  2. John Hyman (2007). Depicting Colours: Reply to Newall. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):674–678.score: 10.0
    In a recent paper in this journal, 'Pictures, Colour and Resemblance', Michael Newall criticizes my views about how colours are depicted. In this reply, I set out my views and then discuss Newall's criticism of them.
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  3. Hedy Amiri & Chad J. Marsolek (2002). Depicting Second-Order Isomorphism and “Depictive” Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):182-183.score: 10.0
    According to Pylyshyn, depictive representations can be explanatory only if a certain kind of first-order isomorphism exists between the mental representations and real-world displays. What about a system with second-order isomorphism (similarities between different mental representations corresponding with similarities between different real-world displays)? Such a system may help to address whether “depictive” representations contribute to the visual nature of imagery.
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  4. David Knight (2003). 'Exalting Understanding Without Depressing Imagination': Depicting Chemical Process. Hyle 9 (2):171 - 189.score: 10.0
    Alchemists' illustrations indicated through symbols the processes being attempted; but with Lavoisier's Elements (1789), the place of imagination and symbolic language in chemistry was much reduced. He sought to make chemistry akin to algebra and its illustrations merely careful depictions of apparatus. Although younger contemporaries sought, and found in electrochemistry, a dynamical approach based upon forces rather than weights, they found this very difficult to picture. Nevertheless, by looking at chemical illustrations in the eighty years after Lavoisier's revolutionary book, we (...)
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  5. Barry Smith (1992). Characteristica Universalis. In Kevin Mulligan (ed.), Language, Truth and Ontology. Kluwer. 48--77.score: 9.0
    Recent work in formal philosophy has concentrated over-whelmingly on the logical problems pertaining to epistemic shortfall - which is to say on the various ways in which partial and sometimes incorrect information may be stored and processed. A directly depicting language, in contrast, would reflect a condition of epistemic perfection. It would enable us to construct representations not of our knowledge but of the structures of reality itself, in much the way that chemical diagrams allow the representation (at a (...)
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  6. Tomis Kapitan, On Depicting Indexical Reference.score: 9.0
    According to Hector-Neri Castañeda, indexical reference is our most basic means of identifying the objects and events we experience and think about. Its tokens reveal our own part in the process by denoting what are "referred to as items present in experience" (Castañeda 1981, 285-6). If you hear me say, "Take that box over there and set it next to this box here," you learn something about my orientation towards the referents in a way that is not conveyed by, "Take (...)
     
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  7. Jennifer M. Rampling (2013). Depicting the Medieval Alchemical Cosmos. Early Science and Medicine 18 (1-2):45-86.score: 9.0
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  8. Maria T. Wowk & Andrew P. Carlin (2004). Depicting a Liminal Position in Ethnomethodology, Conversation Analysis and Membership Categorization Analysis: The Work of Rod Watson. Human Studies 27 (1):69-89.score: 9.0
    This paper provides a provisional examination of Rod Watson''s work and contributions to EM/CA/MCA, in part through a critique of misrepresentations of his arguments in secondary accounts of his work. The form of these misrepresentations includes adumbration and traducement of his arguments. Focusing on the reflexivity of category and sequence and turn-generated categories, we suggest that his analytic position within ethnomethodological fields is unique and remarkable, yet largely unacknowledged. We argue that a re-examination of the body of Watson''s (...)
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  9. Philip V. Kargopoulos & Andreas Demetriou (1988). Logical and Psychological Partitioning of Mind: Depicting the Same Map? .score: 9.0
    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that empirically delimited structures of mind are also differentiable by means of systematic logical analysis. In the sake of this aim, the paper first summarizes Demetriou's theory of cognitive organization and growth. This theory assumes that the mind is a multistructural entity that develops across three fronts: the processing system that constrains processing potentials, a set of specialized structural systems (SSSs) that guide processing within different reality and knowledge domains, and a hypecognitive (...)
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  10. Sonia E. Murrow (2011). Depicting Teachers' Roles in Social Reconstruction in the Social Frontier, 1934–1943. Educational Theory 61 (3):311-333.score: 9.0
    According to the dominant historiographical narrative, the social reconstructionists were a homogeneous group with a shared social, political, economic, and educational agenda. However, the pages of the journal The Social Frontier are replete with evidence that they were not in agreement on significant issues, especially when it came to the proper role of teachers in reform efforts. In fact, a close look reveals that the social reconstructionists presented multiple, overlapping, and often conflicting theories and strategies to advance the reconstruction of (...)
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  11. Norvin Richards (1973). Depicting and Visualizing. Mind 82 (326):218-225.score: 9.0
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  12. Gerrit J. Dimmendaal (2002). Colourful Psi¿s Sleep Furiously: Depicting Emotional States in Some African Languages. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):57-84.score: 9.0
    This study sets out to investigate the ¿poetry of grammar¿, more specifically the role of the body in figurative speech, in African languages mainly belonging to Nilotic and Bantu. Apprehending the semantics and pragmatics of metaphorical and metonymic expressions in these languages presupposes an interaction between a number of cognitive processes, as argued below. Interestingly, these languages seem to use these strategies involving figurative speech in tandem with alternative strategies involving on-record statements. This multivocality only makes sense if we place (...)
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  13. Judith Keilbach (2009). Photographs, Symbolic Images, and the Holocaust: On the (Im)Possibility of Depicting Historical Truth. History and Theory 48 (2):54-76.score: 9.0
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  14. Roger Squires (1969). Depicting. Philosophy 44 (169):193 - 204.score: 9.0
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  15. Nele Van Den Cruyce, Joke Bauwens & Katia Segers (2009). Reflections of a Child. Depicting Healthy Childhood in the 1940s and 1960s. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 87 (3):759-774.score: 9.0
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  16. Nils Güttler (2013). Depicting Evolution: The Visual Material of Darwin's Works. [REVIEW] Metascience 22 (2):355-358.score: 9.0
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  17. Alastair J. L. Blanshard (2004). Depicting Democracy: An Exploration of Art and Text in the Law of Eukrates. Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:1-15.score: 9.0
    This paper examines the range of symbolic associations surrounding the relief sculpture (Democracy crowning the Athenian people) that accompanied the law proposed by Eukrates against the establishment of tyranny. It examines some of the investments made in it by various communities and individuals. The role of personifications in political allegory is examined. This analysis shows both the potency of personifying representations of the Athenian people and the interpretative complexities that they create.
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  18. Corey Creekmur & Teresa Mangum (2007). A Graphic Novel Depicting War as an Interspecies Event: Pride of Baghdad. Society and Animals 15 (4):405-408.score: 9.0
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  19. Nils Guttler (2013). Depicting Evolution: The Visual Material of Darwins Works: Julia Voss: Darwins Pictures: Views of Evolutionary Theory, 18371874. Translated by Lori Lantz. New Haven/London: Yale University Press, 2010, 368pp, $45.00 HB. [REVIEW] Metascience 22 (2):355-358.score: 9.0
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  20. Teresa Mangum & Corey K. Creekmur (2007). A Graphic Novel Depicting War as an Interspecies Event: Pride of Baghdad. Society and Animals 15 (4):405-408.score: 9.0
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  21. E. Marbach (2000). On Depicting. Facta Philosophica 2:291-308.score: 9.0
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  22. A. Sandman (2006). David Buisseret. The Mapmakers' Quest: Depicting New Worlds in Renaissance Europe. Early Science and Medicine 11 (1):111.score: 9.0
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  23. R. Tansey, M. R. Hyman & G. Brown (forthcoming). Ethical Judgments About Wartime Ads Depicting Combat. Journal of Advertising:57--74.score: 9.0
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  24. Christy Mag Uidhir & Henry Pratt (2013). Pornography at the Edge: Depiction, Fiction, & Sexual Predilection. In Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.), Art & Pornography: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    The primary purpose of depictive works of pornography, we take it, is sexual arousal through sexually explicit representations; what we callprototypical pornography satisfies those aims through the adoption of a ceteris paribus maximally realistic depictive style. Given that the purpose of sexual arousal seems best fulfilled by establishing the most robust connections between the viewer and the depictive subject, we find it curious that not all works of pornography aspire to prototypical status. Accordingly, we target for philosophical scrutiny several non-standard (...)
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  25. Christian Lotz (2007). Depiction and Plastic Perception. A Critique of Husserl's Theory of Picture Consciousness. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):171-185.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I will present an argument against Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness. Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness (as it can be found primarily in the recently translated volume Husserliana 23) moves from a theory of depiction in general to a theory of perceptual imagination. Though, I think that Husserl’s thesis that picture consciousness is different from depictive and linguistic consciousness is legitimate, and that Husserl’s phenomenology avoids the errors of linguistic theories, such as Goodman’s, I submit that his (...)
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  26. Bence Nanay (2004). Taking Twofoldness Seriously: Walton on Imagination and Depiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):285–289.score: 6.0
    This paper analyzes Kendall Walton's theory of depiction and, more specifically, his notion of twofoldness. I argue that (1) Walton’s notion of twofoldness is, in spite of what Walton claims, very different from Richard Wollheim’s and (2) Walton’s notion of twofoldness is inconsistent with the rest of his theory of depiction.
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  27. Alastair Hannay (1971). Mental Images: A Defense. Allen & Unwin.score: 6.0
    Reissue from the classic Muirhead Library of Philosophy series (originally published between 1890s - 1970s).
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  28. Patrick Maynard (1989). Talbot's Technologies: Photographic Depiction, Detection, and Reproduction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):263-276.score: 6.0
    Philosophy's only celebration of photography's 150th, the long-neglected philosophical job of clarification: drawing basic distinctions and defining basic conceptions, including photographic depiction, photographic detection, 'photograph of', 'documentary'. More than a lexicon, it explains why photography is important, by historically characterizing it through its uses for depiction, detection, reproduction, all of which have shaped the modern world. By consideration of it as 'mechanical', the paper explains photography's differences from practices with which it shares these functions. Happy birthday, photography.
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  29. Barry Smith (1993). Putting the World Back Into Semantics. Grazer Philosophische Studien 44:91-109.score: 6.0
    To what in reality do the logically simple sentences with empirical content correspond? Two extreme positions can be distinguished in this regard: 'Great Fact' theories, such as are defended by Davidson; and trope-theories, which see such sentences being made the simply by those events or states to which the relevant main verbs correspond. A position midway between these two extremes is defended, one according to which sentences of the given sort are made tme by what are called 'dependence structures', or (...)
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  30. Julia Voss & Sahotra Sarkar (2003). Depictions as Surrogates for Places: From Wallace's Biogeography to Koch's Dioramas. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):59 – 81.score: 6.0
    Habitat dioramas depicting ecological relations between organisms and their natural environments have become the preferred mode of museum display in most natural history museums in North America and Europe. Dioramas emerged in the late nineteenth century as an alternative mode of museum installation from taxonomically arranged cases. We suggest that this change was closely connected to the emergence of a biogeographical framework rooted in evolutionary theory and positing the existence of distinct biogeographical zones. We tie the history of dioramas (...)
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  31. Elisa Caldarola (2013). Understanding Resemblance in Depiction: What Can we Learn from Wittgenstein? Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):239-253.score: 6.0
    Wittgenstein’s remarks on “seeing-as” have influenced several scholars working on depiction. They have especially inspired those who think that in order to understand depiction we should understand the specific kind of visual experience depictions arouse in the viewer (e.g. Gombrich [1960], Wollheim [1968; 1987]). In this paper I would like to go a different way. My hypothesis is that certain of Wittgenstein’s claims both in the Tractatus and in his later writings resonate well within the context of an objective resemblance (...)
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  32. Werner Ceusters, Peter Elkin & Barry Smith (2006). Referent Tracking: The Problem of Negative Findings. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 124:741-46.score: 6.0
    The paradigm of referent tracking is based on a realist presupposition which rejects so-called negative entities (congenital absent nipple, and the like) as spurious. How, then, can a referent tracking-based Electronic Health Record deal with what are standardly called ‘negative findings’? To answer this question we carried out an analysis of some 748 sentences drawn from patient charts and containing some form of negation. Our analysis shows that to deal with these sentences we need to introduce a new ontological relationship (...)
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  33. Helena Howarth, Volker Sommer & Fiona M. Jordan (2010). Visual Depictions of Female Genitalia Differ Depending on Source. Medical Humanities 36 (2):75-79.score: 6.0
    Very little research has attempted to describe normal human variation in female genitalia, and no studies have compared the visual images that women might use in constructing their ideas of average and acceptable genital morphology to see if there are any systematic differences. The objective of the present work was to determine if visual depictions of the vulva differed according to their source so as to alert medical professionals and their patients to how these depictions might capture variation and thus (...)
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  34. Robert Hopkins (1997). El Greco's Eyesight: Interpreting Pictures and the Psychology of Vision. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):441-458.score: 5.0
    There is a common assumption about pictures, that seeing them produces in us something like the same effects as seeing the things they depict. This assumption lies behind much empirical research into vision, where experiments often expose subjects to pictures of things in order to investigate the processes involved in cognizing those things themselves. Can philosophy provide any justification for this assumption? I examine this issue in the context of Flint Schier's account of pictorial representation. Schier attempts to infer the (...)
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  35. Ben Blumson (2009). Defining Depiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (2):143-157.score: 4.0
    It is a platitude that whereas language is mediated by convention, depiction is mediated by resemblance. But this platitude may be attacked on the grounds that resemblance is either insufficient for or incidental to depictive representation. I defend common sense from this attack by using Grice's analysis of meaning to specify the non-incidental role of resemblance in depictive representation.
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  36. Ben Blumson (2008). Depiction and Convention. Dialectica 62 (3):335-348.score: 4.0
    By defining both depictive and linguistic representation as kinds of symbol system, Nelson Goodman attempts to undermine the platitude that, whereas linguistic representation is mediated by convention, depiction is mediated by resemblance. I argue that Goodman is right to draw a strong analogy between the two kinds of representation, but wrong to draw the counterintuitive conclusion that depiction is not mediated by resemblance.
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  37. C. Abell & K. Bantinaki (eds.) (2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
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  38. Mark A. Johnstone (2013). Anarchic Souls: Plato's Depiction of the Democratic Man. Phronesis 58 (2):139-59.score: 4.0
    In books 8 and 9 of Plato’s Republic, Socrates provides a detailed account of the nature and origins of four main kinds of vice found in political constitutions and in the kinds of people that correspond to them. The third of the four corrupt kinds of person he describes is the ‘democratic man’. In this paper, I ask what ‘rules’ in the democratic man’s soul. It is commonly thought that his soul is ruled in some way by its appetitive part, (...)
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  39. Bence Nanay (2010). Inflected and Uninflected Perception of Pictures. In C. Abell & K. Bantilaki (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    It has been argued that picture perception is sometimes, but not always, ‘inflected’. Sometimes the picture’s design ‘inflects’, or is ‘recruited’ into the depicted scene. The aim of this paper is to cash out what is meant by these metaphors. Our perceptual state is different when we see an object fact to face or when we see it in a picture. But there is also a further distinction: our perceptual state is very different if we perceive objects in pictures in (...)
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  40. Ben Blumson (2011). Depictive Structure? Philosophical Papers 40 (1):1-25.score: 4.0
    This paper argues against definitions of depiction in terms of the syntactic and semantic properties of symbol systems. In particular, it is argued that John Kulvicki's definition of depictive symbol systems in terms of relative repleteness, semantic richness, syntactic sensitivity and transparency is susceptible to similar counterexamples as Nelson Goodman's in terms of syntactic density, semantic density and relative repleteness. The general moral drawn is that defining depiction requires attention not merely to descriptive questions about syntax and semantics, but also (...)
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  41. Alberto Voltolini (2012). Towards a Syncretistic Theory of Depiction. In C. Calabi (ed.), Perceptual Illusions. Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Palgrave.score: 4.0
    In this paper I argue for a syncretistic theory of depiction, which combines the merits of the main paradigms which have hitherto faced themselves on this issue, namely the perceptualist and semioticist approaches. The syncretistic theory indeed takes from the former its stress on experiential factors and from the latter its stress on conventional factors. But the theory is even more syncretistic than this, for the way it accounts for the experiential factor vindicates several claims defended by different perceptualist theories. (...)
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  42. Jiri Benovsky (2012). Photographic Representation and Depiction of Temporal Extension. Inquiry 55 (2):194-213.score: 4.0
    The main task of this paper is to understand if and how static images like photographs can represent and/or depict temporal extension (duration). In order to do this, a detour will be necessary to understand some features of the nature of photographic representation and depiction in general. This important detour will enable us to see that photographs (can) have a narrative content, and that the skilled photographer can 'tell a story' in a very clear sense, as well as control and (...)
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  43. Gavin McIntosh (2003). Depiction Unexplained: Peacocke and Hopkins on Pictorial Representation. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):279-288.score: 4.0
    My aim is to show that the accounts of depiction offered by Christopher Peacocke and Robert Hopkins assume rather than explain one of the central features of depiction. This feature is pictorial realism. It is a constraint upon any adequate theory of depiction that it be able to explain pictorial realism; however, Peacocke and Hopkins seek to meet this constraint by employing the notion of resemblance. I raise three problems with Peacocke's account and point out an error in Hopkins's use (...)
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  44. Kendall L. Walton (1976). Points of View in Narrative and Depictive Representation. Noûs 10 (1):49-61.score: 4.0
    The reader's access to the fictional world of a novel is mediated by the narrator, when there is one; the fictional world is presented from the narrator's perspective. do depictions ever have anything comparable to narrators? apparent artists sometimes have a certain perspective on the fictional world. but they don't mediate our access to it; the fictional world is presented independently of their perspective on it. depictions do present fictional worlds from certain perspectives, but not usually the perspectives of any (...)
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  45. John Dilworth (2010). Depictive Seeing and Double Content. In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Picturing. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    A picture provides both configurational content concerning its design features, and recognitional content about its external subject. But how is this possible, since all that a viewer can actually see is the picture's own design? I argue that the most plausible explanation is that a picture's design has a dual function. It both encodes artistically relevant design content, and in turn that design content encodes the subject content of the picture--producing overall a double content structure. Also, it is highly desirable (...)
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  46. Ben Blumson, Depiction and Composition.score: 4.0
    Traditionally, the structure of a language is revealed by constructing an appropriate theory of meaning for that language, which exhibits how – and whether – the meaning of sentences in the language depends upon the meaning of their parts. In this paper, I argue that whether – and how – what pictures represent depends on what their parts represent should likewise by revealed by the construction of appropriate theories of representation for the symbol system of those pictures. This generalisation, I (...)
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  47. A. Asai, M. Fukuyama & Y. Kobayashi (2010). Contemporary Japanese View of Life and Death as Depicted in the Film Departures (Okuribito). Medical Humanities 36 (1):31-35.score: 4.0
    Through films, we can see many aspects of a country and its times: culture, morality and religion, and views on life and death. The best films can both entertain audiences and provide viewers with opportunities to think about fundamental human problems. In this article, we use Departures (Okuribito) to examine the contemporary Japanese view of life and death. All sorts of deaths are depicted and each scene provides an insight into the contemporary Japanese view of death. We use the medium (...)
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  48. Anthony A. Derksen (2004). Occlusion Shapes and Sizes in a Theory of Depiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):319-341.score: 4.0
    John Hyman has used the objective character of occlusion shapes and of relative occlusion sizes to develop a more objective approach both in the analysis of linear perspective and in the theory of depiction. To this end Hyman develops two Occlusion Principles, plus an Aperture Colour Principle (which I do not discuss), which, together with our knowledge of appearances, are supposed to tell us what a picture depicts. I argue that Hyman underestimates the crucial role of the psychological element in (...)
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  49. Norman Y. Teng, The Depictive Nature of Visual Mental Imagery.score: 4.0
    Tye argues that visual mental images have their contents encoded in topographically organized regions of the visual cortex, which support depictive representations; therefore, visual mental images rely at least in part on depictive representations. This argument, I contend, does not support its conclusion. I propose that we divide the problem about the depictive nature of mental imagery into two parts: one concerns the format of image representation and the other the conditions by virtue of which a representation becomes a depictive (...)
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  50. Graeme Forbes, Depiction Verbs and the Definiteness Effect.score: 4.0
    This paper is part of a longer project on the semantics of depiction verbs and their associated relational nouns. Depiction verbs include verbs for physical acts, such as ‘draw’ (with relational noun ‘drawing’), ‘sketch’, ‘caricature’, ‘sculpt’, ‘write (about)’, and verbs for mental ones, such as ‘visualize’, ‘imagine’, and ‘fantasize’.
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