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Derek Bell [10]Derek R. Bell [4]
  1.  174 DLs
    Derek R. Bell (2004). Environmental Refugees: What Rights? Which Duties? Res Publica 10 (2):135-152.
    It is estimated that there could be 200 million‘environmental refugees’ by the middle of this century. One major environmental cause of population displacement is likely to be global climate change. As the situation is likely to become more pressing, it is vital to consider now the rights of environmental refugees and the duties of the rest of the world. However, this is not an issue that has been addressed in mainstream theories of global justice. This paper considers the potential of (...)
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  2.  71 DLs
    Derek Bell (2004). Environmental Justice and Rawls' Difference Principle. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):287-306.
    It is widely acknowledged that low-income and minority communities in liberal democratic societies suffer a disproportionate burden of environmental hazards. Is “environmental injustice” a necessary feature of liberal societies or is its prevalence due to the failure of existing liberal democracies to live up to liberal principles of justice? One leading version of liberalism, John Rawls’ “justice as fairness,” can be “extended” to accommodate the concerns expressed by advocates of environmental justice. Moreover, Rawlsian environmental justice has some significant advantages over (...)
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  3.  48 DLs
    Derek Bell (2011). Global Climate Justice, Historic Emissions, and Excusable Ignorance. The Monist 94 (3):391-411.
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  4.  35 DLs
    Simon Caney & Derek Bell (2011). Morality and Climate Change. The Monist 94 (3):305-309.
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  5.  31 DLs
    Derek Bell (2011). Does Anthropogenic Climate Change Violate Human Rights? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):99-124.
    Early discussions of ?climate justice? have been dominated by economists rather than political philosophers. More recently, analytical liberal political philosophers have joined the debate. However, the philosophical discussion of climate justice remains in its early stages. This paper considers one promising approach based on human rights, which has been advocated recently by several theorists, including Simon Caney, Henry Shue and Tim Hayward. A basic argument supporting the claim that anthropogenic climate change violates human rights is presented. Four objections to this (...)
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  6.  26 DLs
    Derek R. Bell (2004). Creating Green Citizens? Political Liberalism and Environmental Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (1):37–54.
  7.  21 DLs
    Derek R. Bell (2003). Rawls and Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients: A Reply to Maio. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):381-393.
    In his paper, “The Relevance of Rawls’ Principle of Justice for Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients” (Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2002):45–53), Giovanni Maio has developed a thought-provoking argument for the permissibility of non-therapeutic research on cognitively impaired patients. Maio argues that his conclusion follows from the acceptance of John Rawls’s principles of justice, specifically, Rawls’s “liberty principle” Maio has misinterpreted Rawls’s “libertyprinciple” – correctly interpreted it does notsupport non-therapeutic research on cognitivelyimpaired patients. Three other ‘Rawlsian’ arguments are suggested by (...)
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  8.  18 DLs
    Derek Bell (2013). How Should We Think About Climate Justice? Environmental Ethics 35 (2):189-208.
    Climate change raises questions of justice. Some people are enjoying the benefits of energy use and other emissions-generating activities, but those activities are causing other people to suffer the burdens of climate change. Political philosophers have begun to pay more attention to the problem of “climate justice.” However, contributors to the literature have made quite different methodological assumptions about how we should develop a theory of climate justice and defend principles of climate justice. So far, there has been little systematic (...)
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  9.  9 DLs
    Tim Gray, Claire Haggett & Derek Bell (2005). Offshore Wind Farms and Commercial Fisheries in the Uk: A Study in Stakeholder Consultation. Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (2):127 – 140.
    This paper is an exploration of a current environmental issue dividing two industries in the UK. The issue is offshore wind farms, and the industries are commercial fishing and wind energy. The controversy over offshore wind farms highlights three core issues of conflict: the adequacy of stakeholder consultation processes; the right to compensation for loss of livelihood; and the lack of adequate data. We find that the characterisations that developers, regulators, and fishers hold of each other critically inform their positions (...)
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  10.  5 DLs
    Derek Bell (2008). Noxious New York. Environmental Ethics 30 (2):221-222.
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  11.  3 DLs
    Derek R. Bell (2004). The Limits of Nationalism. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (2):219.
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  12.  3 DLs
    Arash Abizadeh, Andrew Altman, Scott Arnold, Birmingham Kim Atkins, Sorin Baisau, Derek Bell, Roslyn Bologh, Thom Brooks, Dario Castiglione & Louis Charland (2008). Recognition of Reviewers. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):467-470.
  13.  0 DLs
    Derek Bell (2006). Political Liberalism and Ecological Justice. Analyse & Kritik 28 (2):206-222.
    Liberalism and ecologism are widely regarded as incompatible. Liberalism and environmentalism might be compatible but liberalism and ecologism are not. A liberal state cannot promote policies for ecological or ecocentric reasons. An individual cannot be both a liberal and a committed advocate of ecologism. This paper challenges these claims. It is argued that Rawls’s ‘political liberalism’ is compatible with ecologism and, in particular, the idea of ‘ecological justice’. A Rawlsian state can promote ecological justice. A committed political liberal can also (...)
     
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