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  1. Derek Bickerton (forthcoming). Inherent Variability and Variable Rules. Foundations of Language.
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  2. Derek Bickerton (forthcoming). Prolegomena to a Linguistic Theory of Metaphor. Foundations of Language.
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  3. Derek Bickerton (2008). But How Did Protolanguage Actually Start? Interaction Studies 9 (1):169-176.
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  4. Derek Bickerton (2008). Darwin's Last Word: How Words Changed Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):132-132.
    Although Penn et al. make a good case for the existence of deep cognitive discontinuity between humans and animals, they fail to explain how such a discontinuity could have evolved. It is proposed that until the advent of words, no species had mental representations over which higher-order relations could be computed.
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  5. Derek Bickerton (2007). Maggie Tallerman (Ed.), Language Origins: Perspectives on Evolution (Studies in the Evolution of Language 4). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Pp. Xx+ 426. [REVIEW] Inquiry 24:461-507.
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  6. Derek Bickerton (2006). Language Use, Not Language, is What Develops in Childhood and Adolescence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):280-281.
    That both language and novel life-history stages are unique to humans is an interesting datum. But failure to distinguish between language and language use results in an exaggeration of the language acquisition period, which in turn vitiates claims that new developmental stages were causative factors in language evolution.
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  7. Derek Bickerton (2005). Beyond the Mirror Neuron – the Smoke Neuron? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):126-126.
    Mirror neurons form a poor basis for Arbib's account of language evolution, failing to explain the creativity that must precede imitation, and requiring capacities (improbable in hominids) for categorizing situations and unambiguously miming them. They also commit Arbib to an implausible holophrastic protolanguage. His model is further vitiated by failure to address the origins of symbolization and the real nature of syntax.
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  8. Derek Bickerton (2005). Language First, Then Shared Intentionality, Then a Beneficent Spiral. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):691-692.
    Tomasello et al. give a good account of how shared intentionality develops in children, but a much weaker one of how it might have evolved. They are unduly hasty in dismissing the emergence of language as a triggering factor. An alternative account is suggested in which language provided the spark, but thereafter language and shared intentionality coevolved.
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  9. Derek Bickerton (2004). Mothering Plus Vocalization Doesn't Equal Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):504-505.
    Falk has much of interest to say on the evolution of mothering, but she fails to address the core issue of language evolution: how symbolism or structure evolved. Control of infants does not require either, and Falk provides neither evidence nor arguments supporting referential symbolism as a component of mother-infant interactions.
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  10. Derek Bickerton (2003). Afferent Isn't Efferent, and Language Isn't Logic, Either. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):286-287.
    Hurford's argument suffers from two major weaknesses. First, his account of neural mechanisms suggests no place in the brain where the two halves of a predicate-argument structure could come together. Second, his assumption that language and cognition must be based on logic is neither necessary nor particularly plausible, and leads him to some unlikely conclusions.
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  11. Derek Bickerton (2003). Language Evolution Without Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):669-670.
    Jackendoff's major syntactic exemplar is deeply unrepresentative of most syntactic relations and operations. His treatment of language evolution is vulnerable to Occam's Razor, hypothesizing stages of dubious independence and unexplained adaptiveness, and effectively divorcing the evolution of language from other aspects of human evolution. In particular, it ignores connections between language and the massive discontinuities in human cognitive evolution.
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  12. Derek Bickerton (2002). Language in the Modular Mind? It’s a No-Brainer! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):677-678.
    Although Carruthers’ proposals avoid some of the more obvious pitfalls that face analysts of the language-cognition relationship, they are needlessly complex and vitiated by his uncritical acceptance of a highly modular variety of evolutionary psychology. He pays insufficient attention both to the neural substrate of the processes he hypothesizes and to the evolutionary developments that gave rise to both language and human cognition.
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  13. Derek Bickerton (2001). Okay for Content Words, but What About Functional Items? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1104-1105.
    Though Bloom makes a good case that learning content-word meanings requires no task-specific apparatus, he does not seriously address problems inherent in learning the meanings of functional items. Evidence from creole languages suggests that the latter process presupposes at least some task-specific mechanisms, perhaps including a list of the limited number of semantic distinctions that can be expressed via functional items, as well as default systems that may operate in cases of impoverished input.
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  14. Derek Bickerton (2000). Broca's Demotion Does Not Doom Universal Grammar. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):25-25.
    Despite problems with statistical significance, ancillary hypotheses, and integration into an overall view of cognition, Grodzinsky's demotion of Broca's area to a mechanism for tracking moved constituents is intrinsically plausible and fits a realistic picture of how syntax works.
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  15. Derek Bickerton (1997). Constructivism, Nativism, and Explanatory Adequacy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):557-558.
    Constructivism is the most recent in a long line of failed attempts to discredit nativism. It seeks support from true (but irrelevant) facts, wastes its energy on straw men, and jumps logical gaps; but its greatest weakness lies in its failure to match nativism's explanation of a wide range of disparate phenomena, particularly in language acquisition.
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  16. Derek Bickerton (1996). A Dim Monocular View of Universal-Grammar Access. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):716-717.
    This target article's handling of theory and data and the range of evidence surveyed for its main contention fall short of normal BBS standards. However, the contention itself is reasonable and can be supported if one rejects the metaphor for linguistic competence and accepts that are no more than the way the brain does language.
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  17. Derek Bickerton (1996). An Innate Language Faculty Needs Neither Modularity nor Localization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):631.
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  18. Derek Bickerton (1996). Language and Human Behavior. Seattle: University Washington Press.
  19. Derek Bickerton (1995). Finding the True Place of Homo Habilis in Language Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):182-183.
    Despite some sound basic assumptions, Wilkins & Wakefield portray a Homo habilis too linguistically sophisticated to fit in with the subsequent fossil record and thereby lose a reasoned explanation for human innovativeness. They err, too, in accepting a single-level model of conceptual structure and in deriving initial linguistic units from calls, a process far more dubious than the derivation of home-sign from naive gesture.
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  20. Derek Bickerton (1993). Putting Cognitive Carts Before Linguistic Horses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):749.
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  21. Derek Bickerton (1992). Unified Cognitive Theory: You Can't Get There From Here. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):437-438.
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  22. Derek Bickerton (1991). Haunted by the Specter of Creole Genesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):364-366.
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  23. Derek Bickerton (1991). Syntax is Not as Simple as It Seems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):552-553.
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  24. Derek Bickerton (1987). The Supremacy of Syntax. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):658.
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  25. Derek Bickerton (1986). “Grammar Growth” – What Does It Really Mean? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):564.
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  26. Derek Bickerton (1986). More Than Nature Needs? A Reply to Premack. Cognition 23 (1):73-79.
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  27. Derek Bickerton (1984). Creole is Still King. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):212.
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  28. Derek Bickerton (1984). The Language Bioprogram Hypothesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):173.
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  29. Derek Bickerton (1983). The Last of Clever Hans? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):141.
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