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  1. Derek Edyvane (2015). The Ethics of Democratic Deceit. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (4).
    Deception presents a distinctive ethical problem for democratic politicians. This is because there seem in certain situations to be compelling democratic reasons for politicians both to deceive and not to deceive the public. Some philosophers have sought to negotiate this tension by appeal to moral principle, but such efforts may misrepresent the felt ambivalence surrounding dilemmas of public office. A different approach appeals to the moral character of politicians, and to the variety of forms of manipulative communication at their disposal. (...)
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  2. Derek Edyvane (2013). Rejecting Society: Misanthropy, Friendship and Montaigne. Res Publica 19 (1):53-65.
    Widespread misanthropy, understood as the disposition to reject society, is at once a permanent source of instability and injustice, and yet also a valuable support of cherished liberal practices, such as toleration. We must seek therefore to ‘civilise’ the misanthropic temper. Michel de Montaigne provides an instructive case study in this context, for he successfully moderated his misanthropy by his conviviality and friendship. The non-conditional character of Montaignean friendship functions to moderate rational misanthropic antipathy and thereby suggests a striking reinterpretation (...)
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  3. Derek Edyvane & Kerri Woods (2013). Reflections on Friendship in Political Theory. Res Publica 19 (1):1-3.
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  4. Derek Edyvane (2012). Civic Virtue and the Sovereignty of Evil. Routledge.
    The last decade has witnessed a growing perception of ethical crisis in public life. Circumstances of political uncertainty, fueled by the rise of international terror and global financial crisis, have placed the practice of civic virtue under severe strain. Our turbulent times have prompted many people to think less about the "good life" and the "good society" and more about their basic needs for safety and reassurance. Consequently, while prominent public commentators call for the reassertion of civic virtue in the (...)
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  5. Derek Edyvane (2011). Britishness, Belonging and the Ideology of Conflict: Lessons From the Polis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):75-93.
    A central aspiration of the ‘Britishness’ agenda in UK politics is to promote community through the teaching of British values in schools. The agenda's justification depends in part on the suppositions that harmony arising from agreement on certain values is a necessary condition of social health and that conflict arising from pluralism connotes a form of dysfunction in social life. These perceptions of harmony and conflict are traceable to the ancient Greeks. Plato used the device of the soul-city analogy to (...)
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  6. Derek Edyvane (2011). In Between: Immigration, Distributive Justice, and Political Dialogue. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):140-143.
  7. Derek Edyvane (2011). Tolerance and Pain. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):405-419.
    It is often thought that tolerance must be painful; the absence of pain is taken as an indication of indifference, an indication that the agent does not really disapprove of the object of her professed tolerance. This article challenges that view by arguing that the association of tolerance and pain depends ultimately upon the contentious assumption that inner conflict is a form of dysfunction. By unsettling that assumption, it is possible to unsettle the idea that one?s tolerance of others must (...)
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  8. Derek Edyvane (2011). The Varieties of Cultural Perception: Multiculturalism After Recognition. The European Legacy 16 (6):735 - 750.
    Doubts about the enterprise of cultural recognition have helped to fuel a backlash against the politics of multiculturalism in Europe during the last decade. Such doubts are well-founded. Charles Taylor's seminal discussion of the politics of recognition neglects serious difficulties that arise for the activity of recognition when the objective and subjective dimensions of cultural identity diverge. Narratives of cultural ?passing? help to highlight these difficulties and demonstrate that recognition can sometimes contribute to identity-based oppression. However, this conclusion does not (...)
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  9. Derek Edyvane & Matt Matravers (2011). Introduction: Toleration Re-Examined. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):281-288.
    This introduction considers recent work in toleration; the nature and definition of toleration; and the relationship between toleration and broader questions of political philosophy.
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  10. Derek Edyvane (2008). Justice as Conflict: The Question of Stuart Hampshire. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (3):317.
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  11. Derek Edyvane (2005). A Back-Turning Harmony: Conflict as a Source of Political Community. [REVIEW] Res Publica 11 (1):27-54.
    It is widely assumed that community presupposes consensus on the good. As a result, liberals who acknowledge the permanence of pluralism have struggled to explain how a liberal society could realise the good of community. Here it is argued that our initial assumption is wrong. Conflict can serve as a source of political community. Our devotion to the things we care about provides us with reason to embark on a quest aimed at the elimination of conflict. The quest will require (...)
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  12. Derek Edyvane (2003). Against Unconditional Love. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):59–75.
    While unconditional love is frequently regarded as the best kind of romantic commitment, our commitments in general are not thought to be unconditional. In other contexts, we think conditional commitment (commitment which can in some sense be rendered intelligible by appeal to reasons) to be superior. This paper examines the peculiar status of unconditional love in the romantic context and argues that it is unwarranted; the best kind of romantic commitment should be viewed as conditional. The first part of the (...)
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