Search results for 'Derek Sellman phd ma bsc rgn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Derek Sellman phd ma bsc rgn (2007). Trusting Patients, Trusting Nurses. Nursing Philosophy 8 (1):28–36.
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  2. D. Sellman (2008). Comment by Derek Sellman On: `Guilty but Good: Defending Voluntary Active Euthanasia From a Virtue Perspective'. Nursing Ethics 15 (4):446-449.
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  3.  10
    Derek Sellman rmn rgn bsc ma (2005). Towards an Understanding of Nursing as a Response to Human Vulnerability. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):2–10.
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  4.  46
    Derek Sellman (2011). What Makes a Good Nurse: Why the Virtues Are Important for Nurses. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
    Professional nursing -- Human vulnerability -- Practices and the practice of nursing -- Trust and trustworthiness -- Open-mindedness -- The place of the virtues in the education of nurses.
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  5.  37
    Derek Sellman (2005). Towards an Understanding of Nursing as a Response to Human Vulnerability. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):2-10.
    It is not unusual for the adjective ‘vulnerable’ to be applied to those in receipt of nursing practice without making clear what it is that persons thus described are actually vulnerable to. In this paper I argue that the way nursing has adopted the idea of vulnerability tends to imply that some people are in some way invulnerable. This is conceptually unsustainable and renders the idea of the vulnerable patient meaningless. The paper explores the meaning of vulnerability both in general (...)
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  6.  5
    Derek Sellman (2006). The Importance of Being Trustworthy. Nursing Ethics 13 (2):105-115.
    The idea that nurses should be trustworthy seems to be accepted as generally unproblematic. However, being trustworthy as a nurse is complicated because of the diverse range of expectations from patients, relatives, colleagues, managers, peers, professional bodies and the institutions within which nursing takes place. Nurses are often faced with competing demands and an action perceived by some as trustworthy can be seen by others as untrustworthy. In this article some of the reasons for the importance of being trustworthy are (...)
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  7.  11
    Derek Sellman (2000). Alasdair MacIntyre and the Professional Practice of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 1 (1):26-33.
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  8.  17
    Derek Sellman (2007). Trusting Patients, Trusting Nurses. Nursing Philosophy 8 (1):28-36.
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  9.  27
    Derek Sellman (2003). Open-Mindedness: A Virtue for Professional Practice. Nursing Philosophy 4 (1):17-24.
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  10.  38
    Derek Sellman (2009). Vulnerability and Nursing: A Reply to Havi Carel. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):220-222.
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  11.  21
    Derek Sellman (2010). Musings on Reflective Practice as a Grand Idea. Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):149-150.
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  12.  5
    Derek Sellman (forthcoming). The Practice of Nursing Research: Getting Ready for ‘Ethics’ and the Matter of Character. Nursing Inquiry:n/a-n/a.
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  13.  4
    Derek Sellman (2015). Against Autonomy: Justifying Coercive Paternalism By Sarah Conly. Cambridge University Press, New York, 2013, C$35.95 , 216 Pages. ISBN 978-1-107-64972-9. [REVIEW] Nursing Philosophy 16 (3):170-173.
  14.  6
    Derek Sellman & David Skidmore (1995). Letters to the Editor. Nursing Ethics 2 (3):260-263.
    The following two letters were received in response to David Skidmore's article, 'Can nursing survive? A view through the keyhole', which was published in the December 1994 issue of Nursing Ethics.David Skidmore has been asked to reply; his comments follow. Both his and Janet Duberley's letters have been shortened with their consent.
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  15.  13
    Derek Sellman (1995). Euphemisms for Euthanasia. Nursing Ethics 2 (4):315-319.
    Many patients are subject to 'do not resuscitate' orders or are 'allowed to die'. The predominant moral position within health care seems to be that this is permissible, while voluntary euthanasia is not. This paper attempts to consider the logic of that position. It is not intended as a case for or against voluntary euthanasia; those cases are made elsewhere. Instead, this is an attempt to challenge implicit assumptions. It is the experience of many nurses that issues relating to matters (...)
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  16.  29
    Derek Sellman (2010). Mind the Gap: Philosophy, Theory, and Practice. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):85-87.
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  17.  2
    Derek Sellman (2015). On Losing Three Friends ofNursing Philosophy. Nursing Philosophy 16 (1):1-2.
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  18.  7
    Derek Sellman (2011). Professional Values and Nursing. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):203-208.
    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly (...)
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  19.  2
    Derek Sellman (2015). If Nurses Nurse, Why Don't Doctors Doctor? Nursing Philosophy 16 (2):75-76.
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  20.  6
    Derek Sellman (2013). The Demise of the Pathway May Have Been Greatly Exaggerated. Nursing Philosophy 14 (4):241-241.
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  21.  14
    Derek Sellman (2003). Truth and Truthfulness. Nursing Philosophy 4 (2):173–174.
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  22.  16
    Derek Sellman (2009). Ten Years of Nursing Philosophy. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):229-230.
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  23.  15
    Derek Sellman (2006). Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles. Nursing Philosophy 7 (2):106–107.
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  24.  12
    Derek Sellman (2009). Ethical Care for Older Persons in Acute Care Settings. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):69-70.
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  25.  8
    Valerie Wilson Rscn Rn Bedst Mn Phd & R. M. N. Rgn (2006). Critical Realism as Emancipatory Action: The Case for Realistic Evaluation in Practice Development. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):45–57.
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  26.  1
    Derek Sellman (1995). Letter-Can Nursing Survive? A View Through the Keyhole. Nursing Ethics 2 (3):260-263.
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  27.  7
    Derek Sellman (2008). Editorial. Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):1–2.
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  28.  5
    Derek Sellman (2011). A Period of Transition. Nursing Philosophy 12 (4):237-238.
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  29.  2
    Derek Sellman (2014). Slow and Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 15 (2):79-80.
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  30.  2
    Derek Sellman (2005). Evidence‐Based Practice: Panacea or Meaningless Sound Bite? Nursing Philosophy 6 (4):221-222.
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  31.  2
    Derek Sellman (2014). Moving Forward in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 15 (3):155-156.
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  32.  3
    Derek Sellman (2012). Catching Up with the Digital Evolution. Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):233-235.
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  33.  5
    Derek Sellman (2008). Acknowledgements to Reviewers. Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):291-291.
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  34.  4
    Derek Sellman (2007). Life, Death, and Subjectivity: Moral Sources in Bioethics. Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):133–134.
    This book presents an exploration of concepts central to health care practice. In exploring such concepts as Subjectivity, Life, Personhood, and Death in deep philosophical terms, the book aims to draw out the ethical demands that arise when we encounter these phenomena, and also the moral resources of health care workers for meeting those demands. The series Values in Bioethics makes available original philosophical books in all areas of bioethics, including medical and nursing ethics, health care ethics, research ethics, environmental (...)
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  35.  5
    Derek Sellman (2009). Acknowledgements to Reviewers. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):302-302.
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  36.  1
    Derek Sellman (2012). Marking and Curving. Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):85-86.
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  37.  1
    Derek Sellman (2005). Book Review: How Can I Be Trusted: A Virtue Theory of Trustworthiness. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 12 (2):212-213.
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  38.  2
    Derek Sellman (2012). A Shortage of Caring in British Nursing? Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):159-160.
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  39.  53
    Havi Carel (2009). A Reply to 'Towards an Understanding of Nursing as a Response to Human Vulnerability' by Derek Sellman: Vulnerability and Illness. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):214-219.
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  40.  22
    Margaret P. Battin (2008). Angela Ballantyne has a BSc in Genetics and a PhD in Bioethics. She has Worked for the World Health Organization (Geneva), Imperial College London (UK), Monash University, and Flinders University (Australia). Her Interests Include Research Ethics, Global Health, Exploitation, Genethics, and Public Health Ethics. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1).
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  41.  2
    C. A. Niven Ca Rgn Bsc Phd & P. A. Scott Pa Rgn Ba Msc Phd (2003). The Need for Accurate Perception and Informed Judgement in Determining the Appropriate Use of the Nursing Resource: Hearing the Patient's Voice. Nursing Philosophy 4 (3):201–210.
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  42. Fred Feldman (2013). Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):309-317.
    Abstract According to the Deprivation Approach, the evil of death is to be explained by the fact that death deprives us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had lived longer. But the Deprivation Approach confronts a problem first discussed by Lucretius. Late birth seems to deprive us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had been born earlier. Yet no one is troubled by late birth. So it’s hard to see why we should be troubled (...)
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  43.  8
    Kim Atkins rgn ba phd (2006). Autonomy and Autonomy Competencies: A Practical and Relational Approach. Nursing Philosophy 7 (4):205–215.
  44.  6
    Sally Glen phd ma rn (2005). Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder: An Ethical Concept? Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):98–105.
  45.  13
    Sandra L. Titus & Janice M. Ballou (2014). Ensuring PhD Development of Responsible Conduct of Research Behaviors: Who's Responsible? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):221-235.
    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work (...)
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  46.  3
    Lisa M. Lee & Frances A. McCarty (2016). Emergence of a Discipline? Growth in U.S. Postsecondary Bioethics Degrees. Hastings Center Report 46 (2):19-21.
    Teaching competency in bioethics has been a concern of the field since its start. In 1976, The Hastings Center published the first report on the teaching of contemporary bioethics. Graduate programs culminating in an MA or PhD were not needed at the time, concluded the report. “In the future, however,” the report speculated, “the development and/or changing social priorities may at some point allow, or even require, the creation of new academic structures for graduate education in bioethics.” Although that future (...)
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  47.  15
    Leo Zaibert (forthcoming). On the Matter of Suffering: Derek Parfit and the Possibility of Deserved Punishment. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.
    Derek Parfit has recently defended the view that no one can ever deserve to suffer. Were this view correct, its implications for the thorny problem of the justification of punishment would be extraordinary: age-old debates between consequentialists and retributivists would simply vanish, as punishment would only—and simply—be justifiable along Benthamite utilitarian lines. I here suggest that Parfit’s view is linked to uncharacteristically weak arguments, and that it ought to be rejected.
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  48.  2
    Lisa M. Robins & Peter J. Kanowski (2008). PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective. Journal of Research Practice 4 (2):Article M3.
    This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors that (...)
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  49.  17
    Guy Walther (2007). Freiheitsentziehende Maßnahmen in Altenpflegeheimen – rechtliche Grundlagen und Alternativen der Pflege. Ethik in der Medizin 19 (4):289-300.
    Freiheitsentziehende Maßnahmen in Altenpflegeheimen sind unter pflegerischen und ethischen, aber auch betreuungsrechtlichen und vor allem strafrechtlichen Gesichtspunkten von besonderer Bedeutung. Häufig sind eingeschränkte Mobilität, Verringerung der kognitiven Funktionen, große Hilfsbedürftigkeit des älteren Menschen der auslösende Faktor für den Einsatz derartiger Einschränkungen. Daneben gibt es jedoch Hinweise, dass die Anwendung freiheitsentziehender Maßnahmen auch mit organisatorischen Abläufen in Altenpflegeeinrichtungen zusammenhängt. Der vorliegende Beitrag diskutiert, wieweit freiheitsentziehende und freiheitsbeschränkende Maßnahmen bei alten Menschen überhaupt zulässig sind und zeigt auf, dass die Entwicklung von alternativen (...)
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  50.  7
    Frank J. Leavitt (1996). Educating Nurses for Their Future Role in Bioethics. Nursing Ethics 3 (1):39-52.
    The emerging new multidisciplinary and crosscultural field of bioethics will require sen sitive, open-minded professionals to take the lead in hospital ethics, in genetic coun selling, and in the teaching of bioethics to students in nursing, medicine and the basic sciences. Nurses with ward experience who return to university to gain an MA or PhD in bioethics are eminently suited for this leadership role, for they may be more likely than physicians to study for a liberal education to supplement their (...)
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