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Profile: Dermot Moran (University College Dublin)
  1. Dermot Moran (2014). What Does Heidegger Mean by the Transcendence of Dasein? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (4):491-514.
    In this paper, I shall examine the evolution of Heidegger?s concept of ?transcendence? as it appears in Being and Time (1927), ?On the Essence of Ground? (1928) and related texts from the late 1920s in relation to his rethinking of subjectivity and intentionality. Heidegger defines Being as ?transcendence? in Being and Time and reinterprets intentionality in terms of the transcendence of Dasein. In the critical epistemological tradition of philosophy stemming from Kant, as in Husserl, transcendence and immanence are key notions (...)
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  2. G. R. Evans, John Marenbon, Dermot Moran, Syed Nomanul Haq, Jon McGinnis, Jon Mcginnis & Thomas Williams (2013). Medieval Philosophy of Religion. Acumen Publishing.
    Volume 2 covers one of the richest eras for the philosophical study of religion. Covering the period from the 6th century to the Renaissance, this volume shows how Christian, Islamic and Jewish thinkers explicated and defended their religious faith in light of the philosophical traditions they inherited from the ancient Greeks and Romans. The enterprise of 'faith seeking understanding', as it was dubbed by the medievals themselves, emerges as a vibrant encounter between - and a complex synthesis of - the (...)
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  3. Rasmus Thybo Jensen & Dermot Moran (2013). Guest Editors' Introduction. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):313-316.
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  4. Dermot Moran (2013). From the Natural Attitude to the Life-World. In Lester Embree & Thomas Nenon (eds.), Husserl’s Ideen. Springer. 105--124.
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  5. Dermot Moran (2013). Intentionality: Some Lessons From the History of the Problem From Brentano to the Present. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):317-358.
    Intentionality (?directedness?, ?aboutness?) is both a central topic in contemporary philosophy of mind, phenomenology and the cognitive sciences, and one of the themes with which both analytic and Continental philosophers have separately engaged starting from Brentano and Edmund Husserl?s ground-breaking Logical Investigations (1901) through Roderick M. Chisholm, Daniel C. Dennett?s The Intentional Stance, John Searle?s Intentionality, to the recent work of Tim Crane, Robert Brandom, Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, among many others. In this paper, I shall review recent discussions (...)
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  6. Dermot Moran (2013). 'Let's Look at It Objectively': Why Phenomenology Cannot Be Naturalized. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:89-115.
    In recent years there have been attempts to integrate first-person phenomenology into naturalistic science. Traditionally, however, Husserlian phenomenology has been resolutely anti-naturalist. Husserl identified naturalism as the dominant tendency of twentieth-century science and philosophy and he regarded it as an essentially self-refuting doctrine. Naturalism is a point of view or attitude (a reification of the natural attitude into the naturalistic attitude) that does not know that it is an attitude. For phenomenology, naturalism is objectivism. But phenomenology maintains that objectivity is (...)
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  7. Dermot Moran (2013). The Early Heidegger. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury. 23.
     
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  8. Dermot Moran (2013). ‘There Is No Brute World, Only An Elaborated World’: Merleau-Ponty on the Intersubjective Constitution of the World. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):355-371.
    In his later works, Merleau-Ponty proposes the notion of ‘the flesh’ as a new ‘element’, as he put it, in his ontological monism designed to overcome the legacy of Cartesian dualism with its bifurcation of all things into matter or spirit. Most Merleau-Ponty commentators recognise that Merleau-Ponty’s notion of ‘flesh’ is inspired by Edmund Husserl’s conceptions of ‘lived body’ and ‘vivacity’ or ‘liveliness’ . But it is not always recognised that, for Merleau-Ponty, the constitution of the world of perception, the (...)
     
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  9. Dermot Moran & Juliette Lemaire (2013). Jean Scot Érigène, La connaissance de soi et la tradition idéaliste. Les Etudes Philosophiques 1 (1):29-56.
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  10. Rasmus Thybo Jensen & Dermot Moran (2012). Introduction: Intersubjectivity and Empathy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):125-133.
  11. Dermot Moran (2012). Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction: Husserl's life and writings; 1. Husserl's Crisis: an unfinished masterpiece; 2. Galileo's revolution and the origins of modern science; 3. The Crisis in psychology; 4. Rethinking tradition: Husserl on history; 5. Husserl's problematical concept of the life-world; 6. Phenomenology as transcendental philosophy; 7. The ongoing influence of Husserl's Crisis.
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  12. Dermot Moran & Joseph Cohen (2012). The Husserl Dictionary. Continuum.
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  13. Dermot Moran (2011). “Even the Papuan is a Man and Not a Beast”: Husserl on Universalism and the Relativity of Cultures. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):463-494.
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  14. Dermot Moran (2011). Introduccíon a la Fenomenologicá. Anthropos.
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  15. Dermot Moran (2011). John Scottus Eriugena. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 646--651.
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  16. Dermot Moran (2011). XIII. Revisiting Sartre's Ontology of Embodiment in Being and Nothingness. In Petrov V. (ed.), Ontological Landscapes: Recent Thought on Conceptual Interfaces Between Science and Philosophy. Ontos. 263.
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  17. Dermot Moran & Lukas Steinacher (2011). Husserl's Letter to Lévy-Bruhl: Introduction. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 8 (1):325-347.
  18. Dermot Moran (2010). Husserl and Heidegger on the Transcendental Homelessness of Philosophy. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
  19. Dermot Moran (2010). Review of Sarah Borden Sharkey, Thine Own Self: Individuality in Edith Stein's Later Writings. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).
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  20. Dermot Moran (2010). Sartre on Embodiment, Touch, and the ‘Double Sensation’. Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):135-141.
    The chapter titled “The Body” in Being and Nothingness offers a groundbreaking, if somewhat neglected, philosophical analysis of embodiment. As part of his “es- say on phenomenological ontology,” he is proposing a new multi-dimensional ontological approach to the body. Sartre’s chapter offers a radical approach to the body and to the ‘flesh’. However, it has not been fully appreciated. Sartre offers three ontological dimensions to embodiment. The first “ontological dimension” addresses the way, as Sartre puts it, “I exist my body.” (...)
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  21. Dermot Moran (2009). Johannes scottus eriugena. In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 3--33.
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  22. Dermot Moran (2009). The Touch of the Eye. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):85-86.
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  23. Dermot Moran (2008). Edmund Husserl’s Letter to Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, 11 March 1935. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 8:325-354.
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  24. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, naturalism (...)
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  25. Dermot Moran (2008). Immanence, Self-Experience, and Transcendence in Edmund Husserl, Edith Stein, and Karl Jaspers. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):265-291.
    Phenomenology, understood as a philosophy of immanence, has had an ambiguous, uneasy relationship with transcendence, with the wholly other, with the numinous. If phenomenology restricts its evidence to givenness and to what has phenomenality, what becomes of that which is withheld or cannot in principle come to givenness? In this paper I examine attempts to acknowledge the transcendent in the writings of two phenomenologists, Edmund Husserl and Edith Stein (who attempted to fuse phenomenology with Neo-Thomism), and also consider the influence (...)
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  26. Dermot Moran (2008). Merleau-Ponty's Reading of Husserl on Embodied Perception. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:77-111.
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  27. Dermot Moran (ed.) (2008). The Routledge Companion to Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Routledge.
    The twentieth century was one of the most significant and exciting periods ever witnessed in philosophy, characterized by intellectual change and development on a massive scale. The Routledge Companion to Twentieth Century Philosophy is an outstanding authoritative survey and assessment of the century as a whole. Featuring twenty-two chapters written by leading international scholars, this collection is divided into five clear parts and presents a comprehensive picture of the period for the first time: major themes and movements logic, language, knowledge (...)
     
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  28. Dermot Moran (2007). Edmund Husserl's Methodology of Concept Clarification. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge. 235.
     
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  29. Dermot Moran (2007). Fink's Speculative Phenomenology: Between Constitution and Transcendence. Research in Phenomenology 37 (1):3-31.
    In the last decade of his life (from 1928 to 1938), Husserl sought to develop a new understanding of his transcendental phenomenology (in publications such as Cartesian Meditations, Formal and Transcendental Logic, and the Crisis) in order to combat misconceptions of phenomenology then current (chief among which was Heidegger’s hermeneutic phenomenology as articulated in Being and Time). During this period, Husserl had an assistant and collaborator, Eugen Fink, who sought not only to be midwife to the birth of Husserl’s own (...)
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  30. Dermot Moran (2007). Heidegger's Transcendental Phenomenology in the Light of Husserl's Project of First Philosophy. In Steven Galt Crowell & Jeff Malpas (eds.), Transcendental Heidegger. Stanford University Press. 135--150.
  31. Dermot Moran (2007). Nicholas of Cusa and Modern Philosophy. In James Hankins (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 173--192.
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  32. Dermot Moran (2007). Review of David R. Cerbone, Understanding Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (1).
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  33. Dermot Moran & Stephen Voss (2007). Volume Introduction. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:11-12.
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  34. Stephen Gersh & Dermot Moran (eds.) (2006). Eriugena, Berkeley, and the Idealist Tradition. University of Notre Dame Press.
  35. Dermot Moran (2006). Adventures of the Reduction. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):283-293.
    In his illuminating Aquinas Lecture Jacques Taminiaux offers a bold interpretation of certain contemporary European philosophers in terms of the way in which they react to and transform Husserl’s phenomenological reduction. He highlights issues relating to embodiment, personhood, and value. Taminiaux sketches Husserl’s emerging conception of the reduction and criticizes certain Cartesian assumptions that Husserl retains even after the reduction, and specifically the assumption that directly experienced mental acts and states are not given in adumbrations but present themselves as they (...)
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  36. Dermot Moran (2006). Ethics and Selfhood: A Critique. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):95 – 107.
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  37. Dermot Moran (2005). Alfredo Ferrarin’s Hegel And Aristotle. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 51:120-126.
     
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  38. Dermot Moran (2005). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity Press.
    This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation ...
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  39. Lester Embree & Dermot Moran (eds.) (2004). Phenomenology: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    Phenomenology as a tradition owes its name to Edmund Husserl, in his Logical Investigations (1900-1). It began as a bold new way of doing philosophy, an attempt to bring it back from abstract metaphysical speculation and empty logical calculation in order to come into contact with concrete living experience. As formulated by Husserl, Phenomenology is the investigation of the structures of consciousness that enable consciousness to refer to objects outside itself. It soon broadened into a world-wide and now century-old tradition. (...)
     
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  40. Dermot Moran (2004). First Page Preview. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (1).
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  41. Dermot Moran (2004). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.
    This work is a substantial contribution to the history of philosophy. Its subject, the ninth-century philosopher John Scottus Eriugena, developed a form of idealism that owed as much to the Greek Neoplatonic tradition as to the Latin fathers and anticipated the priority of the subject in its modern, most radical statement: German idealism. Moran has written the most comprehensive study yet of Eriugena's philosophy, tracing the sources of his thinking and analyzing his most important text, the Periphyseon. This (...)
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  42. Dermot Moran & Lester E. Embree (eds.) (2004). Phenomenology: Critical Concepts in Philosophy Volume 2. Routledge.
     
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  43. Dermot Moran (2003). A Hundred Years of Phenomenology: Perspectives on a Philosophical Tradition (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):422-423.
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  44. Dermot Moran (2003). From Augustine to Nicholas of Cusa. In John Shand (ed.), Fundamentals of Philosophy. Routledge. 155.
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  45. Dermot Moran (2003). Medieval Philosophy. In John Shand (ed.), Fundamentals of Philosophy. Routledge. 155.
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  46. Dermot Moran (2003). Review of Thomas Duddy, A History of Irish Thought. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (1).
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  47. Dermot Moran (2002). Review of Cyril O'Regan, Gnostic Return in Modernity and Gnostic Apocalypse. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (5).
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  48. Dermot Moran & Timothy Mooney (eds.) (2002). The Phenomenology Reader. Routledge.
    The Phenomenology Reader is the first comprehensive anthology of classic writings from phenomenology's major seminal thinkers. The carefully selected readings chart phenomenology's most famous thinkers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre and Derrida as well as less well known figures such as Stein and Scheler. Each author and their writings is introduced and placed in philosophical context by the editors.
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  49. Dermot Moran (2001). Editorial. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (1):1 – 2.
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  50. Dermot Moran (2000). 8 Husserl and the Crisis of the European Sciences. In M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.), The Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge. 2--122.
     
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