Search results for 'Desire Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  50
    David Webster (2005). The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Routledgecurzon.
    David Webster explores the notion of desire as found in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Beginning by addressing the idea of a 'paradox of desire', whereby we must desire to end desire, the varieties of desire that are articulated in the Pali texts are examined. A range of views of desire, as found in Western thought are presented as well as Hindu and Jain approaches. An exploration of the concept of ditthi (view or opinion) is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  15
    David Burton (2010). Curing Diseases of Belief and Desire: Buddhist Philosophical Therapy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (66):187-.
    It seems uncontroversial that Buddhism is therapeutic in intent. The word ‘therapy’ is often used, however, to denote methods of treating medically defined mental illnesses, while in the Buddhist context it refers to the treatment of deep-seated dissatisfaction and confusion that, it is claimed, afflict us all. The Buddha is likened to a doctor who offers a medicine to cure the spiritual ills of the suffering world. In the Pāli scriptures, one of the epithets of the Buddha is ‘the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. David Burton (2010). Curing Diseases of Belief and Desire: Buddhist Philosophical Therapy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:187-217.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  8
    Brian Karafin (2007). Hooked!: Buddhist Writings on Greed, Desire, and the Urge to Consume, And: Subverting Greed: Religious Perspectives on the Global Economy (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 27 (1):179-182.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  45
    Wayne Alt (1980). There is No Paradox of Desire in Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 30 (4):521-528.
  6.  35
    A. L. Herman (1979). A Solution to the Paradox of Desire in Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 29 (1):91-94.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  14
    John Visvader (1980). Reply to Wayne Alt's "There is No Paradox of Desire in Buddhism". Philosophy East and West 30 (4):533-534.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  10
    A. L. Herman (1980). Ah, but There is a Paradox of Desire in Buddhism: A Reply to Wayne Alt. Philosophy East and West 30 (4):529-532.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Michael Kurak (2003). The Relevance of the Buddhist Theory of Dependent Co-Origination to Cognitive Science. Brain and Mind 4 (3):341-351.
    The canonical Buddhist account of the cognitive processes underlying our experience of the world prefigures recent developments in neuroscience. The developments in question are centered on two main trends in neuroscience research and thinking. The first of these involves the idea that our everyday experience of ourselves and of the world consists in a series of discrete microstates. The second closely related notion is that affective structures and systems play critical roles in governing the formation of such states. Both of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  42
    Newman Robert Glass (1995). Working Emptiness: Toward a Third Reading of Emptiness in Buddhism and Postmodern Thought. Scholars Press.
    Newman Robert Glass argues that there are three workings of emptiness capable of grounding thinking and behavior: presence, difference, and essence. The first two readings, exemplified by Heidegger and Mark C. Taylor respectively, present opposing views of the work of emptiness in thinking. The third, essence, presents a position on the work of emptiness in desire and affect. Glass begins by offering a close analysis of presence and difference. He then fashions his own understanding of essence, or emptiness. He (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 2: The Integration of Desire. Lulu.
    An argument that there is a common pattern in conflict between desires and the dialectical integration of those conflicts, at both individual and socio-political levels. Philosophical, psychological, poltical and Buddhist approaches to integration are brought together here to show how the integration of desire contributes to moral objectivity.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Miri Albahari (2006). Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self. Palgrave Macmillan.
    We spend our lives protecting an elusive self - but does the self actually exist? Drawing on literature from Western philosophy, neuroscience and Buddhism (interpreted), the author argues that there is no self. The self - as unified owner and thinker of thoughts - is an illusion created by two tiers. A tier of naturally unified consciousness (notably absent in standard bundle-theory accounts) merges with a tier of desire-driven thoughts and emotions to yield the impression of a self. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  13.  27
    Laurence Tamatea (2010). Online Buddhist and Christian Responses to Artificial Intelligence. Zygon 45 (4):979-1002.
    I report the findings of a comparative analysis of online Christian and Buddhist responses to artificial intelligence. I review the Buddhist response and compare it with the Christian response outlined in an earlier essay (Tamatea 2008). The discussion seeks to answer two questions: Which approach to imago Dei informs the online Buddhist response to artificial intelligence? And to what extent does the preference for a particular approach emerge from a desire to construct the Self? The conclusion is that, like (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  8
    W. Randolph Kloetzli (2007). Nous and Nirvāṇa: Conversations with Plotinus -- An Essay in Buddhist Cosmology. Philosophy East and West 57 (2):140 - 177.
    In the Classical world, the language of cosmology was a means for framing philosophical concerns. Among these were issues of time, motion, and soul; concepts of the limited and the unlimited; and the nature and basis of number. This is no less true of Indian thought-Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Ājivika-where the prestige of the cosmological idiom for organizing philosophical and theological thought cannot be overstated. This essay focuses on the structural similarities in the thought of Plotinus and Buddhist cosmological/philosophical speculation. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  38
    Christian Lindtner (1999). From Brahmanism to Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):5 – 37.
    It is argued that early Buddhism to a very considerable extent can and should be seen as reformed Brahmanism. Speculations about cosmogony in Buddhist s tras can be traced back to Vedic sources, above all R gveda 10.129 & 10.90—two hymns that play a similar fundamental role in the early Upanisads. Like the immortal and unmanifest Brahman and the mortal and manifest Brahm, the Buddha, as a mythological Bhagavat, also had two forms. In his highest form he is “the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  25
    David Loy (1996). Beyond Good and Evil? A Buddhist Critique of Nietzsche. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):37 – 57.
    Abstract In what ways was Nietzsche right, from a Buddhist perspective, and where did he go wrong? Nietzsche understood how the distinction we make between this world and a higher spiritual realm serves our need for security, and he saw the bad faith in religious values motivated by this need. He did not perceive how his alternative, more aristocratic values, also reflects the same anxiety. Nietzsche realised how the search for truth is motivated by a sublimated desire for symbolic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  8
    Debika Saha (2008). Early Buddhist Thought and Post-Modernism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:237-244.
    Buddhism traces its origin to the teachings of the historical figure of Gautama, the Buddha. Buddhist system addresses perennial human concerns and articulates profound insights into human nature and thus provides a practical context against the back ground of which it is possible to unravel the meaning of lives. Different branches of this school developed various scriptural traditions. Among them early Buddhist thought branched out into diversity of orders, schools of thought and teaching lineages. Wisdom and compassion are the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  3
    L. Bishwanath Sharma (2008). Understanding Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:237-250.
    The Buddhism has been developed as a philosophical system along with the Brhamanic tradition to maintain a complete and distinct identity of its own thought after Buddha. This paper attempts to understand the basic philosophical foundation of Buddhism. It believes that the Four Noble Truths (ārya-satya) are the original teachings of the Buddha which contained philosophical insights and thoughts like its doctrine of pratītya-samutpāda. It also presumes that the very existence itself produces the whole human predicaments in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  23
    Jin Y. Park (2003). Living the Inconceivable: Hua-Yen Buddhism and Postmodern Différend. Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):165 – 174.
    This essay attempts a paradigmatic comparison between the fourfold worldview of Hua-yen Buddhism and the postmodern philosophy of Jean-François Lyotard. Employing a tension between centripetal and centrifugal forces as a structural underpinning of these two philosophies, the essay illuminates the liberating nature of Hua-yen Buddhism and postmodern thought together with the shadow of skepticism involved in endorsing a vision for a poly-lingual existence. Despite human beings' desire for a totalitarian vision hidden in every aspect of our discourse, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  14
    Randy Kloetzli (2007). Nous and Nirvāṇa: Conversations with Plotinus — An Essay in Buddhist Cosmology. Philosophy East and West 57 (2):140-177.
    In the Classical world, the language of cosmology was a means for framing philosophical concerns. Among these were issues of time, motion, and soul; concepts of the limited and the unlimited; and the nature and basis of number. This is no less true of Indian thought-Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Ājivika-where the prestige of the cosmological idiom for organizing philosophical and theological thought cannot be overstated. This essay focuses on the structural similarities in the thought of Plotinus and Buddhist cosmological/philosophical speculation. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  1
    L. Bishwanath Sharma (2008). Understanding Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:237-250.
    The Buddhism has been developed as a philosophical system along with the Brhamanic tradition to maintain a complete and distinct identity of its own thought after Buddha. This paper attempts to understand the basic philosophical foundation of Buddhism. It believes that the Four Noble Truths (ārya-satya) are the original teachings of the Buddha which contained philosophical insights and thoughts like its doctrine of pratītya-samutpāda. It also presumes that the very existence itself produces the whole human predicaments in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Michael Boylan (2009). The Extinction of Desire: A Tale of Enlightenment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    What would you do if you suddenly became rich? Michael O’Meara had never asked himself this question. A high school history teacher in Maryland, Michael is content- until, after a freak accident, he unexpectedly finds himself the beneficiary of a million dollars that disrupt his life and leave him questioning everything he had and everything he thought he wanted. _The Extinction of Desire_ blends Buddhist philosophy and fiction to maps the course of one man’s voyage to uncover the fundamental truths (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Michael Boylan (2010). The Extinction of Desire: A Tale of Enlightenment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    What would you do if you suddenly became rich? Michael O’Meara had never asked himself this question. A high school history teacher in Maryland, Michael is content- until, after a freak accident, he unexpectedly finds himself the beneficiary of a million dollars that disrupt his life and leave him questioning everything he had and everything he thought he wanted. _The Extinction of Desire_ blends Buddhist philosophy and fiction to maps the course of one man’s voyage to uncover the fundamental truths (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Michael Boylan (2007). The Extinction of Desire: A Tale of Enlightenment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    What would you do if you suddenly became rich? Michael O’Meara had never asked himself this question. A high school history teacher in Maryland, Michael is content- until, after a freak accident, he unexpectedly finds himself the beneficiary of a million dollars that disrupt his life and leave him questioning everything he had and everything he thought he wanted. _The Extinction of Desire_ blends Buddhist philosophy and fiction to maps the course of one man’s voyage to uncover the fundamental truths (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Michael Boylan (2007). The Extinction of Desire: A Tale of Enlightenment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    What would you do if you suddenly became rich? Michael O’Meara had never asked himself this question. A high school history teacher in Maryland, Michael is content- until, after a freak accident, he unexpectedly finds himself the beneficiary of a million dollars that disrupt his life and leave him questioning everything he had and everything he thought he wanted. _The Extinction of Desire_ blends Buddhist philosophy and fiction to maps the course of one man’s voyage to uncover the fundamental truths (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  2
    Michael Boylan (2008). The Extinction of Desire: A Tale of Enlightenment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    What would you do if you suddenly became rich? Michael O’Meara had never asked himself this question. A high school history teacher in Maryland, Michael is content- until, after a freak accident, he unexpectedly finds himself the beneficiary of a million dollars that disrupt his life and leave him questioning everything he had and everything he thought he wanted. _The Extinction of Desire_ blends Buddhist philosophy and fiction to maps the course of one man’s voyage to uncover the fundamental truths (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Eviatar Shulman (2016). Rethinking the Buddha: Early Buddhist Philosophy as Meditative Perception. Cambridge University Press.
    A cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy, the doctrine of the four noble truths maintains that life is replete with suffering, desire is the cause of suffering, nirvana is the end of suffering, and the way to nirvana is the eightfold noble path. Although the attribution of this seminal doctrine to the historical Buddha is ubiquitous, Rethinking the Buddha demonstrates through a careful examination of early Buddhist texts that he did not envision them in this way. Shulman traces the development of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  7
    W. I. De Silva (1992). Relationships of Desire for No More Children and Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors in Sri Lankan Women. Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):185-99.
    Data from the 1982 Sri Lanka Contraceptive Prevalence Survey are used to identify women who wish to stop childbearing; they differ in socioeconomic status from their counterparts who want more children. Educated women are more likely to be motivated to cease childbearing than non-educated women; Christian or Sinhalese/Buddhist women are more willing to stop childbearing than Moor/Muslim or Tamil/Hindu women. The relationships between sex composition of existing children and women's fertility desires indicate that although moderate son preference exists it does (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.
    Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality implied (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Christian Coseru (2013). Reason and Experience in Buddhist Epistemology. In Steven Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    As a specific domain of inquiry, “ Buddhist epistemology” stands primarily for the dialogical-disputational context in which Buddhists advance their empirical claims to knowledge and articulate the principles of reason on the basis of which such claims may be defended. The main questions pursued in this article concern the tension between the notion that knowledge is ultimately a matter of direct experience---which the Buddhist considers as more normative than other, more indirect, modes of knowing---and the largely discursive and argumentative ways (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  30
    Colette Sciberras (2008). Buddhism and Speciesism: On the Misapplication of Western Concepts to Buddhist Beliefs. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 15:215-240.
    In this article, I defend Buddhism from Paul Waldau’s charge of speciesism. I argue that Waldau attributes to Buddhism various notions that it does not necessarily have, such as the ideas that beings are morally considerable if they possess certain traits, and that humans, as morally considerable beings, ought never to be treated as means. These ideas may not belong in Buddhism, and for Waldau’s argument to work, he needs to show that they do. Moreover, a closer (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Richard Bradley & H. Orri Stefánsson (forthcoming). Desire, Expectation and Invariance. Mind:fzv200.
    The Desire-as-Belief thesis (DAB) states that any rational person desires a proposition exactly to the degree that she believes or expects the proposition to be good. Many people take David Lewis to have shown the thesis to be inconsistent with Bayesian decision theory. However, as we show, Lewis's argument was based on an Invariance condition that itself is inconsistent with the (standard formulation of the) version of Bayesian decision theory that he assumed in his arguments against DAB. The aim (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Susanna Schellenberg (2013). Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion. Journal of Philosophy 110 (9):497-517.
    I argue that any account of imagination should satisfy the following three desiderata. First, imaginations induce actions only in conjunction with beliefs about the environment of the imagining subject. Second, there is a continuum between imaginations and beliefs. Recognizing this continuum is crucial to explain the phenomenon of imaginative immersion. Third, the mental states that relate to imaginations in the way that desires relate to beliefs are a special kind of desire, namely desires to make true in fiction. These (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  34. Bronwyn Finnigan (forthcoming). Buddhist Idealism. In Tyron Goldschmidt & Kenneth Pearce (eds.), Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford
    This article surveys some of the most influential Buddhist arguments in defense of idealism. It begins by clarifying the central theses under dispute and rationally reconstructs arguments from four major Buddhist figures in defense of some or all of these theses. It engages arguments from Vasubandhu’s Viṃśikā and Triṃśikā; Dignāga’s matching-failure argument in the Ālambanaparīkṣā; the sahopalambhaniyama inference developed by Dharmakīrti; and Xuanzang’s weird but clever logical argument that intrigued philosophers in China and Japan. It aims to clarify what is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  95
    Bradford Cokelet (2016). Confucianism, Buddhism, and Virtue Ethics. European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):187-214.
    Are Confucian and Buddhist ethical views closer to Kantian, Consequentialist, or Virtue Ethical ones? And how can such comparisons shed light on the unique aspects of Confucian and Buddhist views? This essay (i) provides a historically grounded framework for distinguishing western views, (ii) identifies a series of questions that we can ask in order to clarify the philosophic accounts of ethical motivation embedded in the Buddhist and Confucian traditions, and (iii) then critiques Lee Ming-huei’s claim that Confucianism is closer to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Andrea Sauchelli (forthcoming). Buddhist Reductionism, Fictionalism About the Self, and Buddhist Fictionalism. Philosophy East and West 67 (2).
    I discuss an interpretation, recently proposed by Mark Siderits, of the claim that within the Buddhist tradition the self is a convenient fiction. I subsequently propose a novel approach to fictionalism in contemporary metaphysics, outline an application of such an approach to the case of the self and then specify one version of fictionalism combined with some basic tenets of Buddhism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  96
    Timothy Schroeder (2004). Three Faces of Desire. Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   41 citations  
  38. Neil Sinhababu (forthcoming). Virtue, Desire, and Silencing Reasons. In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Questions of Character. Oxford University Press
    John McDowell claims that virtuous people recognize moral reasons using a perceptual capacity that doesn't include desire. I show that the phenomena he cites are better explained if desire makes us see considerations favoring its satisfaction as reasons. The salience of moral considerations to the virtuous, like the salience of food to the hungry, exemplifies the emotional and attentional effects of desire. I offer a desire-based account of how we can follow uncodifiable rules of common-sense morality (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Finn Janning (2014). True Detective: Buddhism, Pessimism or Philosophy? Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (4).
    The aim of this paper is to raise two questions. The first question is: How is pessimism related to Buddhism (and vice versa)? The second question is: What relation does an immanent philosophy have to pessimism and Buddhism, if any? Using True Detective, an American television crime drama, as my point of departure, first I will outline some of the likenesses between Buddhism and pessimism. At the same time, I will show how the conduct of one of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  16
    Bronwyn Finnigan (forthcoming). The Nature of a Buddhist Path: Is There a Single Approach to Buddhist Ethical Theory? In Jake Davis (ed.), TBA. Oxford
    Is there a ‘common element’ in Buddhist ethical thought from which one might rationally reconstruct a Buddhist normative ethical theory? While many agree that there is such an element, there is disagreement about whether it is best reconstructed in terms that approximate consequentialism or virtue ethics. This paper will argue that two distinct evaluative relations underlie these distinct positions; an instrumental and constitutive analysis. It will raise some difficulties for linking these distinct analyses to particular normative ethical theories but will (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen & John Michael (2015). Why Desire Reasoning is Developmentally Prior to Belief Reasoning. Mind and Language 30 (5):526-549.
    The predominant view in developmental psychology is that young children are able to reason with the concept of desire prior to being able to reason with the concept of belief. We propose an explanation of this phenomenon that focuses on the cognitive tasks that competence with the belief and desire concepts enable young children to perform. We show that cognitive tasks that are typically considered fundamental to our competence with the belief and desire concepts can be performed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  38
    Graham Oddie (2005). Value, Reality, and Desire. Clarendon Press.
    Value, Reality, and Desire is an extended argument for a robust realism about value. The robust realist affirms the following distinctive theses. There are genuine claims about value which are true or false--there are facts about value. These value-facts are mind-independent - they are not reducible to desires or other mental states, or indeed to any non-mental facts of a non-evaluative kind. And these genuine, mind-independent, irreducible value-facts are causally efficacious. Values, quite literally, affect us. These are not particularly (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  43.  43
    Owen J. Flanagan (2011). The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized. MIT Press.
    An Essay in Comparative Neurophilosophy -- Preface -- Introduction: Buddhism Naturalized -- The Bodhisattva's Brain -- The Colour of Happiness -- Buddhist Epistemology and Science -- Buddhism as a Natural Philosophy. Buddhist Persons -- Being No-self & Being Nice -- Virtue & Happiness -- Postscript: Cosmopolitanism and Comparative Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  44. Chris Heathwood (2006). Desire Satisfactionism and Hedonism. Philosophical Studies 128 (3):539-563.
    Hedonism and the desire-satisfaction theory of welfare are typically seen as archrivals in the contest over identifying what makes one's life go best. It is surprising, then, that the most plausible form of hedonism just is the most plausible form of desire satisfactionism. How can a single theory of welfare be a version of both hedonism and desire satisfactionism? The answer lies in what pleasure is: pleasure is, in my view, the subjective satisfaction of desire. This (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  45.  88
    Jay L. Garfield (2002). Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  46. Dennis W. Stampe (1987). The Authority of Desire. Philosophical Review 96 (July):335-81.
    The Aristotelian dictum that desire is the starting point of practical reasoning that ends in action can of course be denied. Its denial is a commonplace of moral theory in the tradition of Kant. But in this essay I am concerned with that issue only indirectly. I shall not contend that rational action always or necessarily does involve desire as its starting point; nor shall I deny it. My question concerns instead the possibility of its ever beginning in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   35 citations  
  47. Amy Kind (2011). The Puzzle of Imaginative Desire. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):421-439.
    The puzzle of imaginative desire arises from the difficulty of accounting for the surprising behaviour of desire in imaginative activities such as our engagement with fiction and our games of pretend. Several philosophers have recently attempted to solve this puzzle by introducing a class of novel mental states?what they call desire-like imaginings or i-desires. In this paper, I argue that we should reject the i-desire solution to the puzzle of imaginative desire. The introduction of i-desires (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  48.  93
    Derek Baker (2014). The Abductive Case for Humeanism Over Quasi-Perceptual Theories of Desire. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 8 (2):1-29.
    A number of philosophers have offered quasi-perceptual theories of desire, according to which to desire something is roughly to “see” it as having value or providing reasons. These are offered as alternatives to the more traditional Humean Theory of Motivation, which denies that desires have a representational aspect. This paper examines the various considerations offered by advocates to motivate quasi-perceptualism. It argues that Humeanism is in fact able to explain the same data that the quasi-perceptualist can explain, and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49. Michael E. Bratman (2003). A Desire of One's Own. Journal of Philosophy 100 (5):221-42.
    You can sometimes have and be moved by desires which you in some sense disown. The problem is whether we can make sense of these ideas of---as I will say---ownership and rejection of a desire, without appeal to a little person in the head who is looking on at the workings of her desires and giving the nod to some but not to others. Frankfurt's proposed solution to this problem, sketched in his 1971 article, has come to be called (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  50.  12
    Tomomi Asakura (2015). Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000