Search results for 'Dialogue' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christian-Buddhist Dialogue (2004). Dialogue and Universausm No. 1-2/2004. Dialogue and Universalism 14 (1-4):25.score: 150.0
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  2. Secular Universalist Dialogue & A. Multifaith (2003). Dialogue and Universal1sm No. 5/2003. Dialogue and Universalism 13 (5-8).score: 150.0
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  3. Inter-Religious Dialogue (2001). Religious Dialogue. In Gbola Aderibigbe & Deji Ayegboyin (eds.), Religion and Social Ethics. National Association for the Study of Religions and Education (Nasred). 15.score: 120.0
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  4. Ulrich Diehl (2005). On the Art of Intercultural Dialogue. Some Forms, Conditions and Structures. In P. N. Liechtenstein & Ch M. Gueye (eds.), Peace and Intercultural Dialogue. Universitätsverlag Winter.score: 21.0
    This essay begins with the claim that intercultural dialogue is an art rather than a science or technique and it attempts to point out what it takes to learn the art of intercultural dialogue. In PART ONE some basic forms of intercultural dialogue are presented which correlate to some basic forms of human life, such as family, politics, economy, science, art and religion. Also a few common traits about how intercultural dialogue is practised today are specified. (...)
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  5. Peter Rule (2011). Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (9):924-942.score: 18.0
    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a Bakhtin-Freire dialogue on the notions of dialogue and dialectic. It then teases out some of the implications for education theory and practice in relation to two South African (...)
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  6. Antje Jackelen & Philip Hefner (2004). Concluding Dialogue: Challenging the Past, Grasping the Future. Zygon 39 (2):401-412.score: 18.0
    . A dialogue between the outgoing and incoming directors of the Zygon Center for Religion and Science took place as part of the inaugural symposium. In their conversation they speak of the past and present challenges and goals of the Center, outline what is foremost in their minds, and offer glimpses into what they see as the Center’s priorities for future work.
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  7. Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod (2004). Toward a Mechanistic Psychology of Dialogue. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):169-190.score: 18.0
    Traditional mechanistic accounts of language processing derive almost entirely from the study of monologue. Yet, the most natural and basic form of language use is dialogue. As a result, these accounts may only offer limited theories of the mechanisms that underlie language processing in general. We propose a mechanistic account of dialogue, the interactive alignment account, and use it to derive a number of predictions about basic language processes. The account assumes that, in dialogue, the linguistic representations (...)
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  8. Kyung-Man Kim (2011). Habermas on Understanding: Virtual Participation, Dialogue and the Universality of Truth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):393-406.score: 18.0
    Although the success of Habermas’s theory of communicative action depends on his dialogical model of understanding in which a theorist is supposed to participate in the debate with the actors as a ‘virtual participant’ and seek context-transcendent truth through the exchange of speech acts, current literature on the theory of communicative action rarely touches on the difficulties it entails. In the first part of this paper, I will examine Habermas’s argument that understanding other cultural practices requires the interpreter to virtually (...)
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  9. Douglas Pratt (2007). Pluralism, Postmodernism and Interreligious Dialogue. Sophia 46 (3):245-261.score: 18.0
    Interreligious dialogue does not take place in a vacuum, nor is it a matter of casual conversation. Dialogue is a contested phenomenon, advocated and embraced on one hand, eschewed and discarded on the other. By way of an exploration of the fact of plurality, the notions of modernism and postmodernism, and a brief discussion of select pertinent issues (unity, truth, and the very idea of theology), the paradigmatic context of pluralism will be critically discussed. Contemporary engagement in interreligious (...)
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  10. Linda O.’Riordan & Jenny Fairbrass (2008). Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr): Models and Theories in Stakeholder Dialogue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):745 - 758.score: 18.0
    The pharmaceutical sector, an industry already facing stiff challenges in the form of intensified competition and strategic consolidation, has increasingly become subject to a range of pressures. Crucially, in common with other large-scale businesses, pharmaceutical firms find themselves ‹invited’ to respond positively to the corporate ‹social’ responsibility (CSR) expectations of their stakeholders. Consequently, individual managers will almost certainly be obliged to engage in some form of stakeholder dialogue and this, in turn, means that they will have to make difficult (...)
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  11. Paul Piwek (2011). Dialogue Structure and Logical Expressivism. Synthese 183 (S1):33-58.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to develop the implications of logical expressivism for a theory of dialogue coherence. I proceed in three steps. Firstly, certain structural properties of cooperative dialogue are identified. Secondly, I describe a variant of the multi-agent natural deduction calculus that I introduced in Piwek (J Logic Lang Inf 16(4):403–421, 2007 ) and demonstrate how it accounts for the aforementioned structures. Thirdly, I examine how the aforementioned system can be used to formalise an expressivist account of logical (...)
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  12. Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.score: 18.0
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of value creation (...)
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  13. Tasos Kazepides (2012). Education as Dialogue. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):913-925.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common virtues; defends dialogue as a normative concept and interprets the principles of dialogue as extensions of its prerequisite (...)
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  14. Martin Parker & Gordon Pearson (2005). Capitalism and its Regulation: A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):91 - 101.score: 18.0
    This dialogue engages with the ethics of politics of capitalism, and enacts a debate between two participants who have divergent views on these matters. Beginning with a discussion concerning definitions of capitalism, it moves on to cover issues concerning our different understandings of the costs and benefits of global capitalist systems. This then leads into a debate about the nature and purposes of regulation, in terms of whether regulation is intended to make competition work better for consumers, or to (...)
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  15. Domingo García-Marzá (2005). Trust and Dialogue: Theoretical Approaches to Ethics Auditing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (3):209 - 219.score: 18.0
    . The aim of this paper is to put forward an ethical framework for the conceptualization and development of ethics audits, here understood as a catalyst for company dialogue and in general, for management of ethics in the company. Ethics auditing is understood as the opportunity and agreement to devise a system to inform on ethical corporate behavior. This system essentially aims to increase the transparency and credibility of the companys commitment to ethics. At the same time, the process (...)
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  16. W. J. Morgan & Alexandre Guilherme (2012). I and Thou: The Educational Lessons of Martin Buber's Dialogue with the Conflicts of His Times. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):979-996.score: 18.0
    Most of what has been written about Buber and education tend to be studies of two kinds: theoretical studies of his philosophical views on education, and specific case studies that aim at putting theory into practice. The perspective taken has always been to hold a dialogue with Buber's works in order to identify and analyse critically Buber's views and, in some cases, to put them into practice; that is, commentators dialogue with the text. In this article our aims (...)
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  17. D. V. Nikulin (2010). Dialectic and Dialogue. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    In the beginning : dialogue and dialectic in Plato -- Dialectic : via antiqua -- Dialectic : via moderna -- Dialogue : a systematic outlook -- Dialogue : interruption -- Against writing -- (Dialectical) conclusion.
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  18. Paul Piwek (2007). Meaning and Dialogue Coherence: A Proof-Theoretic Investigation. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 16 (4):403-421.score: 18.0
    This paper presents a novel proof-theoretic account of dialogue coherence. It focuses on an abstract class of cooperative information-oriented dialogues and describes how their structure can be accounted for in terms of a multi-agent hybrid inference system that combines natural deduction with information transfer and observation. We show how certain dialogue structures arise out of the interplay between the inferential roles of logical connectives (i.e., sentence semantics), a rule for transferring information between agents, and a rule for information (...)
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  19. Christoph Stückelberger (2009). Dialogue Ethics: Ethical Criteria and Conditions for a Successful Dialogue Between Companies and Societal Actors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):329 - 339.score: 18.0
    Dialogues between companies and actors of society often start as a result of a public scandal or in a situation of crisis. They can lead to short-term public relations activism or to long-term reputation gains. On the basis of cases and of a typology of forms of dialogues, the author develops ethical criteria and conditions for a successful dialogue – the ethical basis for such criteria being values such as equality, freedom and participation. A special focus is put on (...)
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  20. Alain Lecomte & Myriam Quatrini (2011). Figures of Dialogue: A View From Ludics. Synthese 183 (S1):59-85.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we study dialogue as a game, but not only in the sense in which there would exist winning strategies and a priori rules. Dialogue is not governed by game rules like for chess or other games, since even if we start from a priori rules, it is always possible to play with them, provided that some invariant properties are preserved. An important discovery of Ludics is that such properties may be expressed in geometrical terms. The (...)
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  21. Maya Wardeh, Trevor Bench-Capon & Frans Coenen (2009). Padua: A Protocol for Argumentation Dialogue Using Association Rules. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 17 (3):183-215.score: 18.0
    We describe PADUA, a protocol designed to support two agents debating a classification by offering arguments based on association rules mined from individual datasets. We motivate the style of argumentation supported by PADUA, and describe the protocol. We discuss the strategies and tactics that can be employed by agents participating in a PADUA dialogue. PADUA is applied to a typical problem in the classification of routine claims for a hypothetical welfare benefit. We particularly address the problems that arise from (...)
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  22. Douglas Walton & David M. Godden (2005). Persuasion Dialogue in Online Dispute Resolution. Artificial Intelligence and Law 13 (2):273-295.score: 18.0
    In this paper we show how dialogue-based theories of argumentation can contribute to the construction of effective systems of dispute resolution. Specifically we consider the role of persuasion in online dispute resolution by showing how persuasion dialogues can be functionally embedded in negotiation dialogues, and how negotiation dialogues can shift to persuasion dialogues. We conclude with some remarks on how persuasion dialogues might be modelled is such a way as to allow them to be implemented in a mechanical or (...)
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  23. J. Anthony Blair (1998). The Limits of the Dialogue Model of Argument. Argumentation 12 (2):325-339.score: 18.0
    The paper's thesis is that dialogue is not an adequate model for all types of argument. The position of Walton is taken as the contrary view. The paper provides a set of descriptions of dialogues in which arguments feature in the order of the increasing complexity of the argument presentation at each turn of the dialogue, and argues that when arguments of great complexity are traded, the exchanges between arguers are turns of a dialogue only in an (...)
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  24. Kathleen Rehbein, Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Buren (2013). Corporate Responses to Shareholder Activists: Considering the Dialogue Alternative. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):137-154.score: 18.0
    This empirical study examines corporate responses to activist shareholder groups filing social-policy shareholder resolutions. Using resource dependency theory as our conceptual framing, we identify some of the drivers of corporate responses to shareholder activists. This study departs from previous studies by including a fourth possible corporate response, engaging in dialogue. Dialogue, an alternative to shareholder resolutions filed by activists, is a process in which corporations and activist shareholder groups mutually agree to engage in ongoing negotiations to deal with (...)
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  25. Sara L. Uckelman (2013). Medieval Disputationes de Obligationibus as Formal Dialogue Systems. Argumentation 27 (2):143-166.score: 18.0
    Formal dialogue systems model rule-based interaction between agents and as such have multiple applications in multi-agent systems and AI more generally. Their conceptual roots are in formal theories of natural argumentation, of which Hamblin’s formal systems of argumentation in Hamblin (Fallacies. Methuen, London, 1970, Theoria 37:130–135, 1971) are some of the earliest examples. Hamblin cites the medieval theory of obligationes as inspiration for his development of formal argumentation. In an obligatio, two agents, the Opponent and the Respondent, engage in (...)
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  26. Marianne Benard, Huib de Vriend, Paul van Haperen & Volkert Beekman (2010). Science and Society in Dialogue About Marker Assisted Selection. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):317-329.score: 18.0
    Analysis of a European Union funded biotechnology project on plant genomics and marker assisted selection in Solanaceous crops shows that the organization of a dialogue between science and society to accompany technological innovations in plant breeding faces practical challenges. Semi-structured interviews with project participants and a survey among representatives of consumer and other non-governmental organizations show that the professed commitment to dialogue on science and biotechnology is rather shallow and has had limited application for all involved. Ultimately, other (...)
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  27. Ariane Hentsch Cisneros (2011). Understanding Through Appropriation in Interreligious Dialogue on Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):246-259.score: 18.0
    In today's globalized world, we need to communicate values clearly and constructively across cultures and religions to avoid misunderstanding and conflict and to find shared solutions to the issues affecting human communities across the world. This communication is not easy to implement and requires a considerable amount of commitment and empathy. To be effective, intercultural and interreligious dialogues on ethics demand, first of all, an accommodation of different epistemologies coupled with a sincere respect for their richness and internal coherence. Furthermore, (...)
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  28. Gordon Pearson & Martin Parker (2001). The Relevance of Ancient Greeks to Modern Business? A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):341 - 353.score: 18.0
    What follows is a dialogue, in the Platonic sense, concerning the justifications for "business ethics" as a vehicle for asking questions about the values of modern business organisations. The protagonists are the authors, Gordon Pearson – a pragmatist and sceptic where business ethics is concerned – and Martin Parker – a sociologist and idealist who wishes to be able to ask ethical questions of business. By the end of the dialogue we come to no agreement on the necessity (...)
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  29. Douglas Walton (2011). A Dialogue System Specification for Explanation. Synthese 182 (3):349-374.score: 18.0
    This paper builds a dialectical system of explanation with speech act rules that define the kinds of moves allowed, like requesting and offering an explanation. Pre and post-condition rules for the speech acts determine when a particular speech act can be put forward as a move in the dialogue, and what type of move or moves must follow it. A successful explanation has been achieved when there has been a transfer of understanding from the party giving the explanation to (...)
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  30. T. J. M. Bench-Capon, T. Geldard & P. H. Leng (2000). A Method for the Computational Modelling of Dialectical Argument with Dialogue Games. Artificial Intelligence and Law 8 (2-3):233-254.score: 18.0
    In this paper we describe a method for the specification of computationalmodels of argument using dialogue games. The method, which consists ofsupplying a set of semantic definitions for the performatives making upthe game, together with a state transition diagram, is described in full.Its use is illustrated by some examples of varying complexity, includingtwo complete specifications of particular dialogue games, Mackenzie's DC,and the authors' own TDG. The latter is also illustrated by a fully workedexample illustrating all the features of (...)
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  31. Marianna Papastephanou (2012). Crossing the Divide Within Continental Philosophy: Reconstruction, Deconstruction, Dialogue and Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):153-170.score: 18.0
    In this article I explore some points of convergence between Habermas and Derrida that revolve around the intersection of ethical and epistemological issues in dialogue. After some preliminary remarks on how dialogue and language are viewed by Habermas and Derrida as standpoints for departing from the philosophy of consciousness and from logocentric metaphysics, I cite the main points of a classroom dialogue in order to illustrate the way in which the ideas of Habermas and Derrida are sometimes (...)
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  32. Shanta Premawardhana (2011). GREED AS VIOLENCE: Methodological Challenges in Interreligious Dialogue on the Ethics of the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):223-245.score: 18.0
    The current financial crisis is one rooted not in recent deregulation but in the breaking of ancient (religious) laws, and this crisis is one of many ethical problems today that have religious roots. The tone of this essay is informed by a document from the World Council of Churches, which affirms "greed as violence" and that Christians do not have all the answers to the problem of greed; therefore, Christians need to seek solutions with other religious communities. Furthermore, religious leaders, (...)
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  33. Christoph Benn & Adnan A. Hyder (2002). Equity and Resource Allocation in Health Care: Dialogue Between Islam and Christianity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):181-189.score: 18.0
    Inequities in health and health care are one of the greatest challenges facing the international community today. This problem raises serious questions for health care planners, politicians and ethicists alike. The major world religions can play an important role in this discussion. Therefore, interreligious dialogue on this topic between ethicists and health care professionals is of increasing relevance and urgency. This article gives an overview on the positions of Islam and Christianity on equity and the distribution of resources in (...)
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  34. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2010). The "Art of Dialogue" and the Christian-Jewish Encounter. A First Approach. Jahrbuch für Religionsphilosophie 9:67-93.score: 18.0
    In this paper I raise awareness of a crucial blind spot in scholarship on the Christian-Jewish dialogue. The main argument of the paper is that a closer examination of the dialogue form is necessary in order to assess the tenability of Christian-Jewish dialogue. Despite the widespread talk and intensive scholarship about the Jewish-Christian dialogue two things remain unclear: (a) what concept of dialogue is presupposed; (b) what makes the dialogue form appropriate for the Christian-Jewish (...)
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  35. Linda O'Riordan & Jenny Fairbrass (2008). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Models and Theories in Stakeholder Dialogue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):745 - 758.score: 18.0
    The pharmaceutical sector, an industry already facing stiff challenges in the form of intensified competition and strategic consolidation, has increasingly become subject to a range of pressures. Crucially, in common with other large-scale businesses, pharmaceutical firms find themselves 'invited' to respond positively to the corporate 'social' responsibility (CSR) expectations of their stakeholders. Consequently, individual managers will almost certainly be obliged to engage in some form of stakeholder dialogue and this, in turn, means that they will have to make difficult (...)
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  36. Telford Work (2008). Pneumatological Relations and Christian Disunity in Theology-Science Dialogue. Zygon 43 (4):897-908.score: 18.0
    Ecclesial divisions shape and distort the developing interdisciplinary dialogue between Christian theology and the natural and social sciences in ways that can be better understood by focusing on pneumatology, specifically on the variety of ways in which by grace we relate to the Holy Spirit—as giver of life, as Lord, as powerful anointing, as God's gift of wisdom, and as wellspring from Jesus Christ. Each denominational camp of Christians has centered its appreciation of the Holy Spirit on one of (...)
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  37. Tineke A. Abma, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven (2009). Good Care in Ongoing Dialogue. Improving the Quality of Care Through Moral Deliberation and Responsive Evaluation. Health Care Analysis 17 (3):217-235.score: 18.0
    Recently, moral deliberation within care institutions is gaining more attention in medical ethics. Ongoing dialogues about ethical issues are considered as a vehicle for quality improvement of health care practices. The rise of ethical conversation methods can be understood against the broader development within medical ethics in which interaction and dialogue are seen as alternatives for both theoretical or individual reflection on ethical questions. In other disciplines, intersubjectivity is also seen as a way to handle practical problems, and methodologies (...)
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  38. Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook (2013). Sleeping with the Enemy? Strategic Transformations in Business–NGO Relationships Through Stakeholder Dialogue. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):505-518.score: 18.0
    Campaigning activities of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have increased public awareness and concern regarding the alleged unethical and environmentally damaging practices of many major multinational companies. Companies have responded by developing corporate social responsibility strategies to demonstrate their commitment to both the societies within which they function and to the protection of the natural environment. This has often involved a move towards greater transparency in company practice and a desire to engage with stakeholders, often including many of the campaign organisations that (...)
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  39. Hao Fan (2008). The Meaning-Dialogue in Mutual Interpretation of Ethical-Economical Concepts and its Value Dissimilation. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):254-266.score: 18.0
    A mutual interpretation and theoretical transplant of ethical-economical concepts is a process of the dialogue and discussion on its “meaning,” and also a process of the transmission and interaction of values. However, over-interpretation, which is inevitable in “understanding” “meaning,” and the plight of the “hegemony of values,” bring potential risks to value dissimilation in the interpretation and transplant. Value migration—value hegemony—value dissimilation is its general process of development. The academic reasoning behind overcoming the risk of value dissimilation is value (...)
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  40. Wilfrid Hodges (forthcoming). Dialogue Protocols for Formal Fallacies: A Reply to Kacprzak and Yaskorska. Argumentation:1-7.score: 18.0
    This note comments on the paper ‘Dialogue protocols for formal fallacies’ by Kacprzak and Yaskorska (this issue). Points discussed include the use of the notions of ‘claiming’, ‘conceding’ and ‘commitment’, and the role of Lorenzen dialogues as a device for checking whether a proposition is a tautology.
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  41. Raymond Kolcaba (2000). Angelic Machines: A Philosophical Dialogue (2). [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):11-17.score: 18.0
    Is machine autonomy the same as human autonomy? Answers to this question are developed inphilosophical dialogue. Becket Geist, a romanticphilosopher with scientific leanings, is irked by thearrogance of Fortran McCyborg – a Model 2000 cyborg. Nonette Naturski, a champion of naturalistic views,joins Becket in playing devil''s advocate by arguingthat Fortran''s actions are voluntary, not chosen byhim, and lacking the freedom caused by deliberatedesire. With the attempts to reduce Fortran''s status,Fortran ups the ante by arguing for yet higher status– that (...)
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  42. Raymond Kolcaba (2000). Loss of the World: A Philosophical Dialogue (1). [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):3-9.score: 18.0
    Humanity has begun to move from the natural world intothe cyber world. Issues surrounding this mentalmigration are debated in philosophical dialogue. Thelead character is Becket Geist, a romantic philosopherwith views tempered by 20th century science. He openswith a monologue in which he argues that loss of theworld in exchange for the cyber world is dark andinevitable. His chief adversary is Fortran McCyborg,a cyborg with leanings toward Scottish philosophy. The moderating force is Nonette Naturski who championsnaturalism, conservation of (...)
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  43. Josep M. Lozano & Alfons Sauquet (1999). Integrating Business and Ethical Values Through Practitioner Dialogue. Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):203 - 217.score: 18.0
    In practice, the relationship between business and ethics is not well-settled. In the past, organisations have developed an interest in setting value charts but this has been approached from a purely managerial perspective following the momentum and interest aroused by research on organisational cultures. Although interest in managing organisational cultures has slowly died down, for both theoretical and practical reasons we argue that there are feasible ways to explore values as part of an organisational culture. Indeed it is our claim (...)
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  44. Carlos Thiebaut (2006). A Metaphilosophical Dialogue. Topoi 25 (1-2):109-115.score: 18.0
    Three philosophical attitudes in dialogue are suggested in answering the question posed by the Journal. An inviting, First Inner Voice undeerstands philosophy as a shareable theoretical task that can be explained and understood even across distant philosophical paradigms. A Second Inner Voice, sometimes termed in the dialogue as sceptic, distrusts any metaphilosophical definition of what philosophy is and what it should do, but would, nevertheless, aspire to retain a certain universalistic understanding of its own work, though it cannot (...)
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  45. Douglas N. Walton (1989). Dialogue Theory for Critical Thinking. Argumentation 3 (2):169-184.score: 18.0
    A general outline of a theory of reasoned dialogue is presented as an underlying basis of critical analysis of a text of argument discourse. This theory is applied to the analysis of informal fallacies by showing how textual evidence can be brought to bear in argument reconstruction. Several basic types of dialogue are identified and described, but the persuasive type of dialogue is emphasized as being of key importance to critical thinking theory.
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  46. Mary Terrell White (1998). Decision-Making Through Dialogue: Reconfiguring Autonomy in Genetic Counseling. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):5-19.score: 18.0
    Nondirective genetic counseling developed as a means of promoting informed and independent decision-making. To the extent that it minimizes risks of coercion, this counseling approach effectively respects client autonomy. However, it also permits clients to make partially informed, poorly reasoned or ethically questionable choices, and denies counselors a means of demonstrating accountability for the use of their services. These practical and ethical tensions result from an excessive focus on noncoercion while neglecting the contribution of adequate information and deliberative competence to (...)
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  47. Robert Aman (2012). The EU and the Recycling of Colonialism: Formation of Europeans Through Intercultural Dialogue. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):1010-1023.score: 18.0
    The present essay focuses on problematizing the European Union's claim that intercultural dialogue constitutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries—inside as well as outside the classroom—based on mutual empathy and non-domination. More precisely, the aim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue through the discourse produced by the EU in policies on education, culture and intercultural dialogue. Within the Union, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, (...)
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  48. Nathan Eric Dickman (forthcoming). Between Gadamer and Ricoeur: Preserving Dialogue in the Hermeneutical Arc for the Sake of a God Who Speaks and Listens. Sophia:1-21.score: 18.0
    Wolterstorff defends the claim not only that ‘God speaks’ through the Bible but also that the reader gains ever new insights upon subsequent readings of it. I qualify this project with the philosophical hermeneutics he rejects—namely that of Gadamer and Ricoeur. Wolterstorff thinks what he calls ‘authorial discourse interpretation’ provides warrant for religious communities believing that ‘God speaks’ to them through a text. In developing this hermeneutic, he dismisses the viability of Gadamer and Ricoeur's approach because, Wolterstorff asserts, their form (...)
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  49. Peter McBurney & Simon Parsons (2001). Dialogue Games in Multi-Agent Systems. Informal Logic 22 (3).score: 18.0
    Formal dialogue games have been studied in philosophy since at least the time of Aristotle. Recently they have been applied in various contexts in computer science and artificial intelligence, particularly as the basis for interaction between autonomous software agents. We review these applications and discuss the many open research questions and challenges at this exciting interface between philosophy and computer science.
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  50. A. P. Norman (2001). The Normative Structure of Adjudicative Dialogue. Argumentation 15 (4):489-498.score: 18.0
    Resolution-oriented dialogue has a normative structure that is largely subject to theoretical explication. This paper develops a simple model that sheds light on how moves in a reason-giving game alter the distribution of discursive commitments and entitlements. By clarifying the practice of deontic scorekeeping, we can enhance our collective capacity to resolve conflicts dialogically.
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