Search results for 'Dialogue form in philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Anderson Gonçalves da Silva (2015). Narrative Form, Dialogue and Philosophy : Inactuality and the Present in Schelling. Trans/Form/Ação 38 (3):57-74.
    RESUMO:Não é incomum que se tome o diálogo de Schelling conhecido como Clara por um estoque de proposições filosóficas, do qual se arrancam aquelas mais apropriadas para a tese que se queira sustentar. Procuramos nos afastar desse tipo de procedimento. Tomando seriamente seu tratamento literário, trata-se antes de investigar esse diálogo, apreendendo-o como um modelo, ensaiado pelo filósofo, para uma crítica do presente. Para tanto, analisamos a oscilação entre diálogo e narrativa, de modo a compreender sua composição e princípio formal, (...)
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  2.  9
    T. M. Rudavsky (2010). The Art of Dialogue in Jewish Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 97-99.
    Hughes’ second major work can be read as an amplification of his first work, The Texture of the Divine, in which attention was paid to “secondary” themes in Jewish philosophy pertaining to aesthetics, poetics, and rhetoric; these themes have often been marginalized in histories of Jewish philosophy. In both works, Hughes focuses upon the importance of cultural history in understanding philosophical texts, exploring motifs and tropes often left out of more mainstream histories of Jewish philosophy. In The (...)
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  3.  58
    Enrique Dussel (2009). A New Age in the History of Philosophy: The World Dialogue Between Philosophical Traditions. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):499-516.
    This article argues the following points. (1) It is necessary to affirm that all of humanity has always sought to address certain `core universal problems' that are present in all cultures. (2) The rational responses to these `core problems' first acquire the shape of mythical narratives. (3) The formulation of categorical philosophical discourses is a subsequent development in human rationality, which does not, however, negate all mythical narratives. These discourses arose in all the great urban neolithic cultures (even if only (...)
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  4. Aaron W. Hughes (2007). The Art of Dialogue in Jewish Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    Aaron W. Hughes presents the first major study of dialogue as a Jewish philosophical practice. Examining connections between Jewish philosophy, the literary form in which it is expressed, and the culture in which it is produced, Hughes shows how Jews understood and struggled with their social, religious, and intellectual environments. In this innovative and insightful book, Hughes addresses various themes associated with the literary form of dialogue as well as its philosophical reception: Why did various (...)
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  5. Arthur H. Jentz (1985). Whitehead's Philosophy: Primary Texts in Dialogue. Upa.
    Provides an introduction to the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead in the form of a dialogue between Whitehead and the author.
     
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  6. Béla Szabados (2014). Wittgenstein as Philosophical Tone-Poet: Philosophy and Music in Dialogue. Editions Rodopi.
    This book provides the first in-depth exploration of the importance of music for Ludwig Wittgenstein’s life and work. Wittgenstein’s remarks on music are essential for understanding his philosophy: they are on the nature of musical understanding, the relation of music to language, the concepts of representation and expression, on melody, irony and aspect-perception, and, on the great composers belonging to the Austrian-German tradition. Biography and philosophy, this work suggests that Wittgenstein was a composer of philosophy who used (...)
     
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  7. Gary Alan Scott (ed.) (2007). Philosophy in Dialogue: Plato's Many Devices. Northwestern University Press.
    Traditional Plato scholarship, in the English-speaking world, has assumed that Platonic dialogues are merely collections of arguments. Inevitably, the question arises: If Plato wanted to present collections of arguments, why did he write dialogues instead of treatises? Concerned about this question, some scholars have been experimenting with other, more contextualized ways of reading the dialogues. This anthology is among the first to present these new approaches as pursued by a variety of scholars. As such, it offers new perspectives on Plato (...)
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  8.  26
    Andrea Wilson Nightingale (1995). Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this very original study, the author investigates how Plato "invented" the discipline of philosophy. In order to define and legitimize philosophy, Dr. Nightingale maintains, Plato had to match it against genres of discourse that had authority and currency in democratic Athens. By incorporating traditional genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues, Plato marks the boundaries of philosophy as a discursive and as a social practice.
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  9.  15
    Andrea Denise Watson (1996). Reciprocity in the Form of Dialogue in Husserl's Transcendental Idealistic Account of World-Constitution. International Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):103-116.
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  10.  91
    David A. Conway (1974). Capital Punishment and Deterrence: Some Considerations in Dialogue Form. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (4):431-443.
  11.  22
    Jason Goulah (2012). Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):997-1009.
    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928– ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue—what I call ‘value-creative dialogue’—as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach philosophically in Buddhism; in the examples of dialogue modeled by Ikeda's mentor, Josei Toda (1900–1958), and by Toda's mentor, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871–1944); and in Makiguchi's theory of (...)
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  12.  7
    Leo Groarke (1994). Form and Transformation: A Study in the Philosophy of Plotinus Frederic M. Schroeder McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas, Vol. 16. Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1992, Xiv + 125 Pp., $34.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33 (04):751-.
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  13. Leo Groarke (1994). "Form and Transformation: A Study in the Philosophy of Plotinus", by Frederic M. Schroeder. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33:751.
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  14.  12
    Gideon Manning (ed.) (2012). Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy. Brill.
    Bringing together an international team of historians of science and philosophy to discuss the fate of matter and form, this volume shows how disputes about matter and form spurred innovation as well as conservatism in early modern science ...
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  15. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological (...)
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  16.  6
    Rick Repetti (2015). Christian Coseru, Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (4):191-193.
    This work focuses on a narrow Buddhist epistemological tradition that begins with the Abhidharma philosopher Vasubandhu’s analyses of perception and is developed by Dignāga, Dharmakīrti, Kamalaśīla, and Śāntarakṣita. Coseru explains how Buddhist epistemology evolved in dialogue with competing conceptions internal to Buddhism and against orthodox Indian philosophies, particularly Nyāya and Mīmāṃsā. Coseru’s main argument is that although widespread interpretations of Buddhist epistemology are foundationalist, a more useful way to understand it is as a form of phenomenology consistent with (...)
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  17.  1
    Hans-Georg Gadamer & Robert H. Paslick (eds.) (1993). Literature and Philosophy in Dialogue: Essays in German Literary Theory. State University of New York Press.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer, the major proponent of philosophical hermeneutics, reveals himself here as a highly sensitive reader and critic of the German literary tradition. This is not the work of a specialist as narrowly defined in the typical literary study. Although he is a master of the techniques of criticism, Gadamer always sees the study of literature as a fundamentally human activity where human beings, generation after generation, pose their questions to an encroaching darkness that threatens to rob them of their (...)
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  18. Robert H. Paslick (ed.) (1993). Literature and Philosophy in Dialogue: Essays in German Literary Theory. State University of New York Press.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer, the major proponent of philosophical hermeneutics, reveals himself here as a highly sensitive reader and critic of the German literary tradition. This is not the work of a specialist as narrowly defined in the typical literary study. Although he is a master of the techniques of criticism, Gadamer always sees the study of literature as a fundamentally human activity where human beings, generation after generation, pose their questions to an encroaching darkness that threatens to rob them of their (...)
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  19.  1
    Julio Paulo Tavares Zabatiero (2010). Rumo a uma Filosofia da Religião em tom Pós-metafísico. Diálogos com Habermas e Rorty (Towards a philosophy of religion in a post-metaphysical tone. Dialogue with Habermas and Rorty) - DOI: DOI – 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n16p12. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (16):12-32.
    Este artigo consiste em um diálogo com textos de Jürgen Habermas e Richard Rorty referentes ao tema da religião e seu lugar na sociedade contemporânea. Em vista do tom dialogal, as citações desses autores são relativamente numerosas, a fim de que as suas vozes sobressaiam no texto. O objetivo do diálogo é extrair pistas para a construção de uma filosofia da religião em tom pós-metafísico, ou não fundacional. Não é um texto exaustivo, mas sugestivo. Não se propõe a tecer críticas (...)
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  20. Jana Mohr Lone & Michael D. Burroughs (2016). Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialog in K-12 Classrooms is a textbook in the fields of pre-college philosophy and philosophy of education, intended for philosophers and philosophy students, K-12 classroom teachers, administrators and educators, policymakers, and pre-college practitioners of all kinds.
     
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  21. Jennifer Lisa Vest (2005). The Promise of Caribbean Philosophy: How It Can Cpntribute to a "New Dialogic" in Philosophy. Caribbean Studies 33 (2):3-34.
    The Caribbean is a site where multiple cultures, peoples, waysof thinking and acting have come together and where new formsof philosophy are emerging. The promise of Caribbean philoso-phy lays in its ability to give shape to an intellectual tradition which is both true to and beneficial to Caribbean peoples whilesimultaneously being provocative enough to engage wisdom-seekers of various geographies and identities. I argue that onlyby pursuing a “New Dialogic” which engages the philosophicaltraditions of Africans, African Americans, and Native Ameri-cans (...)
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  22. William Roberson (1993). The Ironic Space: Philosophy and Form in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. P. Lang.
     
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  23.  6
    Hanoch Ben‐Pazi (2015). Ethics Responsibility Dialogue The Meaning of Dialogue in Lévinas's Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):n/a-n/a.
    This article examines the concept of dialogue in the philosophy of Emmanuel Lévinas, with a focus on the context of education. Its aim is to create a conversation between the Lévinasian theory and the theories of other philosophers, especially Martin Buber, in an effort to highlight the ethical significance that Lévinas assigns to the act of dialogue itself. As a philosopher whose essential interest was trained on the infinite ethical responsibility of the human subject, Lévinas places major (...)
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  24.  5
    Joanne Waugh (1997). Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):615-616.
    Book Reviews Andrea Wilson Nightingale, Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Pp. xiv + ~a~. Cloth, $49.95. This is an important and timely book. Nightingale argues that notwithstanding Socra- tes' remarks about dialectic as the philosophical mode of discourse, Plato uses tradi- tional genres in constructing philosophy. Key to her argument are two notions. The first is that prior to Plato, 'philosophy' referred to intellectual cultivation in the (...)
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  25.  70
    Kenneth Burke (1973). The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action. University of California Press.
    Probes the nature of linguistic or symbolic action as it relates to specific novels, plays, and poems.
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  26.  28
    Nancey Murphy (2007). On the Role of Philosophy in Theology-Science Dialogue. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 63 (1/3):489 - 505.
    Most disagreements about the proper place of philosophy in the theologyscience dialogue stem from disagreements about the nature of philosophy itself This essay traces some of the history of ideas about the nature of philosophy, and then proposes that in this post-analytic era philosophy can play both a constructive and critical role in the theology-science dialogue. The constructive role is well reflected in current literature, so this article explores the role of philosophy as (...)
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  27. Jana Mohr Lone & Michael D. Burroughs (2016). Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialogue in Schools. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy in Education: Questioning and Dialog in K-12 Classrooms is a textbook in the fields of pre-college philosophy and philosophy of education, intended for philosophers and philosophy students, K-12 classroom teachers, administrators and educators, policymakers, and pre-college practitioners of all kinds.
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  28. Catherine H. Zuckert (1990). Natural Right and the American Imagination: Political Philosophy in Novel Form. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    '...a remarkable book....Zuckert shows, subtly and persuasively, how the themes of American literature resonate with those of modern thought...Zuckert brings us to the point where philosophy and politics intersect. Few projects have such depth.'-AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW.
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  29. Adriaan Theodoor Peperzak (1986). System and History in Philosophy: On the Unity of Thought & Time, Text & Explanation, Solitude & Dialogue, Rhetoric & Truth in the Practice of Philosophy and its History. State University of New York Press.
    The book begins with the problem of the relationship between systematic philosophy and the history of philosophy. Why does philosophy attach so much importance to history? Consideration of this question is an essential part of metaphysics, and it has important consequences for the methodology of both history and philosophy. An analysis of the problem that begins the book leads to many other fundamental questions concerning the nature of philosophy. In treating these issues the author discusses (...)
     
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  30. Christopher Gill (1996). Afterword: Dialectic and the Dialogue Form in Late Plato. In Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford University Press 283--311.
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  31. Shane Duarte (2013). Matter and Form in Early Modern Science and Philosophy Ed. By Gideon Manning (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):681-682.
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  32.  31
    Thomas Williams (2005). Aquinas in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophy. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):483-491.
    In her volume on Aquinas for Routledge’s “Arguments of the Philosophers” series, Eleonore Stumps aims at an interpretation of Aquinas that is historically faithful but also responsive to the concerns of contemporary philosophers. I assess her success in attaining this twofold aim by examining in detail Stump’s overview of Aquinas’s metaphysics, which engages with contemporary debates over constitution and identity, and her interpretation of Aquinas’s account of justice, which brings Aquinas into dialogue with Annette Baier and Thomas Nagel. I (...)
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  33.  88
    Susanna Siegel, Dialogue About Philosophy in Spanish.
    This is a compilations of short talks presented at a workshop held at Harvard in April 14 on the life of analytic philosophy today in Spanish. Authors include Susanna Siegel, Diana Acosta and Patricia Marechal, Diana Perez, Laura Pérez, and Josefa Toribio.
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  34. Albert Fell (1984). L. Pompa and WH Dray, Eds., Substance and Form in History: A Collection of Essays in Philosophy of History Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 4 (4):170-172.
     
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  35.  8
    Simon Goldhill (ed.) (2008). The End of Dialogue in Antiquity. Cambridge University Press.
    'Dialogue' was invented as a written form in democratic Athens and made a celebrated and popular literary and philosophical style by Plato. Yet it almost completely disappeared in the Christian empire of late antiquity. This book, the first general and systematic study of the genre in antiquity, asks: who wrote dialogues and why? Why did dialogue no longer attract writers in the later period in the same way? Investigating dialogue goes to the heart of the central (...)
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  36. H. A. Knott (2007). Wittgenstein, Concept Possession and Philosophy: A Dialogue. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book offers a Wittgensteinian study of concept possession and of the nature of conceptual investigation in philosophy. It is both an ideal advanced introduction to Wittgenstein's philosophy and an original treatment of some of its most crucial yet least developed regions. The book is written as a Socratic dialogue, which frames the discussion within a backward glance to Plato's Theory of Forms. In so doing it makes a bold claim as to Wittgenstein's place in Western (...). (shrink)
     
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  37.  60
    Brook Ziporyn (2008). Form, Principle, Pattern, or Coherence? Li in Chinese Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):401–422.
    This article provides an overview of controversies in the history of Chinese philosophy concerning the diversity of meanings of the term Li , as well as the comparative issues raised in various attempts by modern Chinese and Western interpreters to come to terms with this diversity of meanings. Revisiting the earliest pre-philosophical uses of the term, an attempt is then made to synthesize the insights of previous interpreters and open up a new path for investigating its distinctive implications in (...)
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  38.  40
    Michael Eze & Thaddeus Metz (2015). Emergent Issues in African Philosophy: A Dialogue with Kwasi Wiredu. Philosophia Africana 17 (2):75-87.
    These are major excerpts from an interview that was conducted with Professor Kwasi Wiredu at Rhodes University during the 13th Annual Conference of The International Society for African Philosophy and Studies in 2007. He speaks on a wide range of issues such as political and personal identity, racism and tribalism, moral foundations, the Golden Rule, African communalism, human rights, personhood, consensus, meta-philosophy, amongst other critical themes.
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  39.  68
    John J. Haldane (1998). A Return to Form in the Philosophy of Mind. Ratio 11 (3):253-277.
  40. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form (...)
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  41.  62
    Harvey Lederman (2014). Ho Pote on Esti and Coupled Entities: A Form of Explanation in Aristotle's Natural Philosophy. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 46:109-64.
  42.  4
    Crystal L'Hôte (2012). Philosophy in the Wild. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):263-274.
    I describe and articulate the merits of an elegant supplemental exercise that I call “Philosophy in the Wild” , which has students initiating a philosophical dialogue outside the classroom and critically reflecting on the results. The PW exercise is especially effective if used to reinforce philosophic texts which have dialogue as their form or as their subject matter —for instance, Plato’s Apology and Meno. However, the PW exercise is also an engaging, effective way simply to introduce (...)
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  43.  33
    Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  44. Aaron Sloman, Virtual Machine Functionalism: The Only Form of Functionalism Worth Taking Seriously in Philosophy of Mind.
    Most philosophers appear to have ignored the distinction between the broad concept of Virtual Machine Functionalism (VMF) described in Sloman&Chrisley (2003) and the better known version of functionalism referred to there as Atomic State Functionalism (ASF), which is often given as an explanation of what Functionalism is, e.g. in Block (1995). -/- One of the main differences is that ASF encourages talk of supervenience of states and properties, whereas VMF requires supervenience of machines that are arbitrarily complex networks of causally (...)
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  45.  12
    Robert Nola (1994). There Are More Things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, Than Are Dreamt of in Your Philosophy: A Dialogue on Realism and Constructivism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):689-727.
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  46. James Crooks (1997). Andrea Wilson Nightingale, Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (1):65-67.
  47.  63
    Ronald Beiner (2010). Civil Religion: A Dialogue in the History of Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau: Three Versions of the Civil Religion Project: 1. Rousseau's problem; 2. The Machiavellian solution: paganization of Christianity; 3. Moses and Mohammed as founder-princes or legislators; 4. Re-founding and 'filiacide': Machiavelli's debt to Christianity; 5. The Hobbesian solution: Judaicization of Christianity; 6. Behemoth: Hobbesian 'theocracy' versus the real thing; 7. Geneva Manuscript: the apparent availability of a Rousseauian solution; 8. Social Contract: the ultimate unavailability of a Rousseauian solution; Part II. Responses to (...)
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  48. Stephen G. Post, Lynn G. Underwood, Jeffrey P. Schloss & William B. Hurlbut (2002). Altruism and Altruistic Love: Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The concept of altruism, or disinterested concern for another's welfare, has been discussed by everyone from theologians to psychologists to biologists. In this book, evolutionary, neurological, developmental, psychological, social, cultural, and religious aspects of altruistic behavior are examined. It is a collaborative examination of one of humanity's essential and defining characteristics by renowned researchers from various disciplines. Their integrative dialogue illustrates that altruistic behavior is a significant mode of expression that can be studied by various scholarly methods and understood (...)
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  49. Gerard A. Hauser (ed.) (2008). Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape. Penn State University Press.
    _Philosophy and Rhetoric, _one of Penn State Press’s longest-running journals, was conceived at a time of immense philosophical upheaval: rhetoric as a field of study—first dismissed by Descartes—was being reexamined after decades of neglect. Now, nearly forty years later, _Philosophy and Rhetoric _continues to hold pride of place in this reinvigorated discipline. The brainchild of Penn State professors Carroll Arnold and Henry Johnstone, _Philosophy and Rhetoric_ boasts work from dozens of international luminaries from a broad spectrum of specializations. To commemorate (...)
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  50. P. Srirama Murti (1992). Form and Function of Relation in ViSistadvaita Philosophy. In V. N. Jha (ed.), Relations in Indian Philosophy. Sri Satguru Publications 147--185.
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