Search results for 'Dialogues, Greek' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. W. K. C. Guthrie (1975). A History of Greek Philosophy: Volume 4, Plato: The Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. Cambridge University Press.
    The fourth volume of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek thought deals exclusively with Plato. Plato, however, so prolific a writer, so profoundly original in his thought, and so colossal an influence on the later history of philosophy, that it has not been possible to confine him to one volume. Volume IV therefore offers a general introduction to his life and writings, and covers the so-called 'early' and 'middle' periods of his philosophical development.
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  2. W. K. C. Guthrie (1986). A History of Greek Philosophy: Volume 4, Plato: The Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. Cambridge University Press.
    The fourth volume of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek thought deals exclusively with Plato. Plato, however, so prolific a writer, so profoundly original in his thought, and so colossal an influence on the later history of philosophy, that it has not been possible to confine him to one volume. Volume IV therefore offers a general introduction to his life and writings, and covers the so-called 'early' and 'middle' periods of his philosophical development.
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  3.  2
    G. B. Kerferd & W. K. C. Guthrie (1977). A History of Greek Philosophy. 4. Plato: The Man and His Dialogues, Earlier Period. Journal of Hellenic Studies 97:181.
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  4.  10
    M. J. Woods (1978). A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV W. K. C. Guthrie: A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV, Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. Pp. Xviii + 603. Cambridge: University Press, 1975. Cloth, £12. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):81-84.
  5.  8
    M. L. West (2015). Greek–Mesopotamian Dialogues. J. Haubold Greece and Mesopotamia. Dialogues in Literature. Pp. XII + 222, Ill. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £55, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-01076-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 65 (1):5-6.
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  6.  15
    W. W. Goodwin (1893). Jowett's Dialogues of Plato The Dialogues of Plato, Translated Into English with Analyses and Introductions by B. Jowett, M.A., Master of Balliol College, Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford, Doctor of Theology of the University of Leyden. In Five Volumes. Third Edition, Revised and Corrected Throughout, with Marginal Analyses and an Index of Subjects and Proper Names. Oxford. At the Clarendon Press. 1892. (New York. Macmillan & Co.) £4 4s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (4):161-163.
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  7.  11
    John Peter Anton (1978). A History of Greek Philosophy. Volume 4, Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (1):95-99.
  8.  12
    Rufus B. Richardson (1893). Neohellenica An Introduction to Modern Greek, in the Form of Dialogues, Containing Specimens of the Language From the Third Century B.C. To the Present Day, to Which is Added an Appendix Giving Examples of the Cypriot Dialect. By Professor Michael Constantinides. Translated Into English in Collaboration with Major-Gen. H. T. Rogers, R. E. London and New York. Macmillan and Co. 1892. Pp. Xiv. 470. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (06):279-.
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  9.  3
    W. K. C. Guthrie (1977). A History of Greek Philosophy: Volume IV: Plato, The Man and His Dialogues, Earlier Period. Philosophical Review 86 (2):254-260.
  10.  6
    Arthur Madigan (1977). A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV: Plato: The Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. [REVIEW] Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):209-210.
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  11.  14
    John Z. Mckay & Alexander Rehding (2011). The Structure of Plato's Dialogues and Greek Music Theory: A Response to JB Kennedy. Apeiron 44 (4):359-375.
  12.  10
    I. M. Crombie (1976). A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period W. K. C. Guthrie Cambridge University Press, 1975, Xviii + 603 Pp., £12.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 51 (197):360-.
  13.  9
    Ruth Scodel (2007). Literature (A.) Kahane Diachronic Dialogues. Authority and Continuity in Homer and the Homeric Tradition. (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches). Lanham: Lexington Books, 2005. Pp. 265. £43, 9780739111338 (Hbk); £13.99, 9780739111345 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:156-.
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  14.  6
    Georges Leroux (1983). A History of Greek Philosophy Vol. 4, Plato: The Man and His Dialogues. Earlier Period Vol. 5, The Later Plato and the Academy W. K. C. Guthrie Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1975, 1978. Vol. 4, Pp. Xviii, 603; Vol. 5, Pp. Xvi, 539Plato: The Written and Unwritten Doctrines J. N. Findlay International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Et New York: Humanities Press, 1974. Pp. 484. [REVIEW] Dialogue 22 (3):555-559.
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  15.  2
    Richard Lim (1991). Theodoret of Cyrus and the Speakers in Greek Dialogues. Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:181-182.
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  16.  1
    Betty A. Sichel (1983). Correspondence and Contradiction in Ancient Greek Society and Education: Homer's Epic Poetry and Plato's Early Dialogues. Educational Theory 33 (2):49-59.
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  17. I. M. Crombie (1976). GUTHRIE, W. K. C. "A History of Greek Philosophy", Vol. IV: "Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period". [REVIEW] Philosophy 51:360.
     
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  18. K. W. Harrington (1978). W. K. C. Guthrie's "A History of Greek Philosophy". Volume IV: "Plato: The Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (3):431.
     
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  19. Plato (1804). The Works of Plato, Viz His Fifty-Five Dialogues and Twelve Epistles ; Translated From the Greek, Nine of the Dialogues by the Late Floyer Sydenham, and the Remainder by Thomas Taylor ; with Occasional Annotations on the Nine Dialogues Translated by Sydenham and Copious Notes by the Latter Translator . Ams Press.
     
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  20. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series (...)
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  21.  20
    Seth Benardete (2000). The Argument of the Action: Essays on Greek Poetry and Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    This volume brings together Seth Benardete's studies of Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Iliad, and Greek tragedy, of eleven Platonic dialogues, and Aristotle's Metaphysics. These essays, some never before published, others difficult to find, span four decades of his work and document its impressive range. Benardete's philosophic reading of the poets and his poetic reading of the philosophers share a common ground that makes this collection a whole. The key, suggested by his reflections on Leo Strauss in the last piece, lies (...)
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  22.  2
    John Russon (ed.) (1999). Retracing the Platonic Text. Northwestern University Press.
    The result illustrates the depth of Platonic thought and the debt of all philosophy to it. Retracing the Platonic Text is a pioneering effort in demonstrating how Continental philosophy both reflects and expands upon Greek philosophy.
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  23. Plato (2011). Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
     
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  24.  32
    Ruby Blondell (2002). The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form, and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding (...) 'character' words (especially ethos), including ancient Greek views about the influence of dramatic character on an audience. The figure of Sokrates qua Platonic 'hero' also receives preliminary discussion. The remaining chapters offer close readings of select dialogues, chosen to show the wide range of ways in which Plato uses his characters, with special emphasis on the kaleidoscopic figure of Sokrates and on Plato's own relationship to his 'dramatic' hero. (shrink)
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  25.  7
    D. Futter (2011). Socratic “Argument” in Plato's Early Definitional Dialogues. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):122-131.
    It is widely assumed that the Socrates of Plato’s definitional dialogues is an arguer, that is, someone who argues, or presents arguments. This conception of Socrates is so entrenched in the scholarship that it is built into the best English translations of Plato’s texts, which render the Greek word ‘logos’ – a word with a bewilderingly large number of possible meanings – as ‘argument’ in contexts in which this is highly disputable. This essay explores the relation between questioning, assertion, (...)
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  26. Diskin Clay (2000). Platonic Questions: Dialogues with the Silent Philosopher. Penn State University Press.
    The dialogue has disappeared as a mode of writing philosophy, and philosophers who study Plato today often ignore the form in which Plato’s work appears in favor of reconstructing and analyzing arguments thought to be conveyed by the content of the dialogues. A distinguished classicist here offers an approach to understanding Plato that tries to do full justice to the form of Platonic philosophy, appreciated against the background of Greek literature and history, while also giving proper due to the (...)
     
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  27.  29
    Hee-Young Park (2008). The Greek Theos and its Influence on the Formation of Platonic Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:149-163.
    The purpose of this study is to elucidate how the Greek concept of God influenced the formation of Platonic philosophy by examining the terms 'theios' & Theos, as used in his dialogues. In the first chapter, we have highlighted how the collective representation brought by the immediate ‘participation mystique’ with the sacred force(mana) is evolved into the notion of Daimon or Theos as a mediator which will tie the human-being with the sacred force, & how the Greek Theos (...)
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  28. William S. Cobb (ed.) (1993). The Symposium and the Phaedrus: Plato's Erotic Dialogues. State University of New York Press.
    The Symposium and the Phaedrus are combined here because of their shared theme: a reflection on the nature of erotic love, the love that begins with sexual desire but can transcend that origin and reach even the heights of religious ecstasy. This reflection is carried out explicitly in the speeches and conversations in the dialogues, and implicitly in the dramatic depiction of actions and characters. Thus, the two dialogues deal with a theme of enduring interest and are interesting for both (...)
     
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  29. Mark Anderson & Ginger Osborn, Approaching Plato: A Guide to the Early and Middle Dialogues.
    Approaching Plato is a comprehensive research guide to all (fifteen) of Plato’s early and middle dialogues. Each of the dialogues is covered with a short outline, a detailed outline (including some Greek text), and an interpretive essay. Also included (among other things) is an essay distinguishing Plato’s idea of eudaimonia from our contemporary notion of happiness and brief descriptions of the dialogues’ main characters.
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  30. John P. Anton & George L. Kustas (eds.) (2004). Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy I. State University of New York Press.
    The essays in this volume treat a wide variety of fundamental topics and problems in ancient Greek philosophy. The scope of the section on pre-Socratic thought ranges over the views which these thinkers have on such areas of concern as religion, natural philosophy and science, cosmic periods, the nature of elements, theory of names, the concept of plurality, and the philosophy of mind. The essays dealing with the Platonic dialogues examine with unusual care a great number of central themes (...)
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  31. Elizabeth S. Belfiore (2016). Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  32. Ruby Blondell (2006). The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding (...) 'character' words, including ancient Greek views about the influence of dramatic character on an audience. The figure of Sokrates qua Platonic 'hero' also receives preliminary discussion. The remaining chapters offer close readings of select dialogues, chosen to show the wide range of ways in which Plato uses his characters, with special emphasis on the kaleidoscopic figure of Sokrates and on Plato's own relationship to his 'dramatic' hero. (shrink)
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  33. Diskin Clay (2007). Platonic Questions: Dialogues with the Silent Philosopher. Penn State University Press.
    The dialogue has disappeared as a mode of writing philosophy, and philosophers who study Plato today often ignore the form in which Plato’s work appears in favor of reconstructing and analyzing arguments thought to be conveyed by the content of the dialogues. A distinguished classicist here offers an approach to understanding Plato that tries to do full justice to the form of Platonic philosophy, appreciated against the background of Greek literature and history, while also giving proper due to the (...)
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  34. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2010). Dialogues of Plato: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  35. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2010). Dialogues of Plato 4 Volume Paperback Set: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  36. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2012). Dialogues of Plato: Volume 1: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  37. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2011). Dialogues of Plato: Volume 2: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  38. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2011). Dialogues of Plato: Volume 3: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  39. Benjamin Jowett (ed.) (2011). Dialogues of Plato: Volume 4: Translated Into English, with Analyses and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    One of the leading scholars and academic administrators of his time, Benjamin Jowett was Master of Balliol College as well as Regius Professor of Greek and, for a time, vice-chancellor at Oxford University. Along with his achievements in the area of academic reform, Jowett is remembered for this four-volume translation of Plato's dialogues. Characterising Plato as the 'father of idealism', Jowett reminds readers that while 'he may be illustrated by the writings of moderns … he must be interpreted by (...)
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  40.  12
    G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
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  41. David Roochnik (2002). An Introduction to Greek Philosophy. Teaching Co..
    lecture 1. A dialectical approach to Greek philosophy -- lecture 2. From myth to philosophy, Hesiod and Thales -- lecture 3. The Milesians and the quest for being -- lecture 4. The great intrusion, Heraclitus -- lecture 5. Parmenides, the champion of being -- lecture 6. Reconciling Heraclitus and Parmenides -- lecture 7. The Sophists, Protagoras, the first "humanist" -- lecture 8. Socrates -- lecture 9. An introduction to Plato's Dialogues -- lecture 10. Plato versus the Sophists, I -- (...)
     
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  42. Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (2006). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Philosophy Presented to G. E. L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
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  43. Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (2006). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Philosophy Presented to G. E. L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
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  44. Lucian . (2009). Selected Dialogues. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'you'll find another man to harvest, Glycerion: let this one go' The Greek satirist Lucian was a brilliantly entertaining writer who invented the comic dialogue as a vehicle for satiric comment. His influence was immense, not only in the Greek world, but on later European writers such as Rabelais and Swift. His dialogues puncture the pretensions of pompous philosophers and describe the daily lives of Greek courtesans; they are peopled by politicians, historians and ordinary citizens, as well (...)
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  45.  39
    John Beversluis (2000). Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a rereading of the early dialogues of Plato from the point of view of the people with whom Socrates engages in debate. Existing studies are thoroughly dismissive of the interlocutors and reduce them to the status of mere mouthpieces for views that are hopelessly confused or demonstrably false. This book takes interlocutors seriously and treats them as genuine intellectual opponents whose views are often more defensible than commentators have generally thought.
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  46.  4
    Grace M. Ledbetter (2002). Poetics Before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry. Princeton University Press.
    Combining literary and philosophical analysis, this study defends an utterly innovative reading of the early history of poetics. It is the first to argue that there is a distinctively Socratic view of poetry and the first to connect the Socratic view of poetry with earlier literary tradition.Literary theory is usually said to begin with Plato's famous critique of poetry in the Republic. Grace Ledbetter challenges this entrenched assumption by arguing that Plato's earlier dialogues Ion, Protagoras, and Apology introduce a distinctively (...)
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  47. Wolfgang Reisinger (1996). Ancient Myth and Philosophy in Peter Russell's Agamemnon in Hades. Edwin Mellen Press.
     
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  48.  6
    Robert S. Brumbaugh (1956). Plato's Mathematical Imagination. The Mathematical Passages in the Dialogues and Their Interpretation. Journal of Philosophy 53 (13):415-418.
  49.  24
    A. P. Bos (1989). Cosmic and Meta-Cosmic Theology in Aristotle's Lost Dialogues. Brill.
    CHAPTER ONE A 'DREAMING KRONOS' IN A LOST WORK BY ARISTOTLE In the following study we shall be concerned with the interpretation of dreams. ...
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  50. Henry Teloh (1989). Socratic Education in Plato's Early Dialogues. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 26 (1):60-61.
     
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