Search results for 'Dialogues, Greek' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth Dorter (1978). A History of Greek Philosophy, VOL. IV. By W.K.C. Guthrie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Toronto: Macmillan Co. Of Canada Ltd. (Plato the Man and His Dialogues Earlier Period). 1975. $37.50. 621 Pages. [REVIEW] Dialogue 17 (01):186-190.score: 37.0
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  2. Georges Leroux (1983). A History of Greek Philosophy Vol. 4, Plato: The Man and His Dialogues. Earlier Period Vol. 5, The Later Plato and the Academy W. K. C. Guthrie Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1975, 1978. Vol. 4, Pp. Xviii, 603; Vol. 5, Pp. Xvi, 539Plato: The Written and Unwritten Doctrines J. N. Findlay International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Et New York: Humanities Press, 1974. Pp. 484. [REVIEW] Dialogue 22 (03):555-559.score: 37.0
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  3. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.score: 36.0
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series (...)
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  4. Ruth Scodel (2007). Literature (A.) Kahane Diachronic Dialogues. Authority and Continuity in Homer and the Homeric Tradition. (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches). Lanham: Lexington Books, 2005. Pp. 265. £43, 9780739111338 (Hbk); £13.99, 9780739111345 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:156-.score: 36.0
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  5. I. M. Crombie (1976). A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period W. K. C. Guthrie Cambridge University Press, 1975, Xviii + 603 Pp., £12.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 51 (197):360-.score: 36.0
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  6. John Z. Mckay & Alexander Rehding (2011). The Structure of Plato's Dialogues and Greek Music Theory: A Response to JB Kennedy. Apeiron 44 (4):359-375.score: 36.0
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  7. Rufus B. Richardson (1893). Neohellenica An Introduction to Modern Greek, in the Form of Dialogues, Containing Specimens of the Language From the Third Century B.C. To the Present Day, to Which is Added an Appendix Giving Examples of the Cypriot Dialect. By Professor Michael Constantinides. Translated Into English in Collaboration with Major-Gen. H. T. Rogers, R. E. London and New York. Macmillan and Co. 1892. Pp. Xiv. 470. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (06):279-.score: 36.0
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  8. Betty A. Sichel (1983). Correspondence and Contradiction in Ancient Greek Society and Education: Homer's Epic Poetry and Plato's Early Dialogues. Educational Theory 33 (2):49-59.score: 36.0
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  9. John Peter Anton (1978). A History of Greek Philosophy. Volume 4, Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (1):95-99.score: 36.0
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  10. W. W. Goodwin (1893). Jowett's Dialogues of Plato The Dialogues of Plato, Translated Into English with Analyses and Introductions by B. Jowett, M.A., Master of Balliol College, Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford, Doctor of Theology of the University of Leyden. In Five Volumes. Third Edition, Revised and Corrected Throughout, with Marginal Analyses and an Index of Subjects and Proper Names. Oxford. At the Clarendon Press. 1892. (New York. Macmillan & Co.) £4 4s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (04):161-163.score: 36.0
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  11. G. B. Kerferd & W. K. C. Guthrie (1977). A History of Greek Philosophy. 4. Plato: The Man and His Dialogues, Earlier Period. Journal of Hellenic Studies 97:181.score: 36.0
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  12. Richard Lim (1991). Theodoret of Cyrus and the Speakers in Greek Dialogues. Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:181-182.score: 36.0
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  13. Plato (1804/1979). The Works of Plato, Viz His Fifty-Five Dialogues and Twelve Epistles ; Translated From the Greek, Nine of the Dialogues by the Late Floyer Sydenham, and the Remainder by Thomas Taylor ; with Occasional Annotations on the Nine Dialogues Translated by Sydenham and Copious Notes by the Latter Translator . Ams Press.score: 36.0
     
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  14. M. J. Woods (1978). A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV W. K. C. Guthrie: A History of Greek Philosophy, Volume IV, Plato, the Man and His Dialogues: Earlier Period. Pp. Xviii + 603. Cambridge: University Press, 1975. Cloth, £12. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):81-84.score: 36.0
  15. Plato (2011). Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..score: 31.0
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
     
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  16. Seth Benardete (2000). The Argument of the Action: Essays on Greek Poetry and Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 27.0
    This volume brings together Seth Benardete's studies of Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Iliad, and Greek tragedy, of eleven Platonic dialogues, and Aristotle's Metaphysics. These essays, some never before published, others difficult to find, span four decades of his work and document its impressive range. Benardete's philosophic reading of the poets and his poetic reading of the philosophers share a common ground that makes this collection a whole. The key, suggested by his reflections on Leo Strauss in the last piece, lies (...)
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  17. Wolfgang Reisinger (1996). Ancient Myth and Philosophy in Peter Russell's Agamemnon in Hades. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 24.0
     
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  18. Mark Anderson & Ginger Osborn, Approaching Plato: A Guide to the Early and Middle Dialogues.score: 21.0
    Approaching Plato is a comprehensive research guide to all (fifteen) of Plato’s early and middle dialogues. Each of the dialogues is covered with a short outline, a detailed outline (including some Greek text), and an interpretive essay. Also included (among other things) is an essay distinguishing Plato’s idea of eudaimonia from our contemporary notion of happiness and brief descriptions of the dialogues’ main characters.
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  19. Ruby Blondell (2002). The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form, and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding (...) 'character' words (especially ethos), including ancient Greek views about the influence of dramatic character on an audience. The figure of Sokrates qua Platonic 'hero' also receives preliminary discussion. The remaining chapters offer close readings of select dialogues, chosen to show the wide range of ways in which Plato uses his characters, with special emphasis on the kaleidoscopic figure of Sokrates and on Plato's own relationship to his 'dramatic' hero. (shrink)
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  20. Hee-Young Park (2008). The Greek Theos and its Influence on the Formation of Platonic Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:149-163.score: 21.0
    The purpose of this study is to elucidate how the Greek concept of God influenced the formation of Platonic philosophy by examining the terms 'theios' & Theos, as used in his dialogues. In the first chapter, we have highlighted how the collective representation brought by the immediate ‘participation mystique’ with the sacred force(mana) is evolved into the notion of Daimon or Theos as a mediator which will tie the human-being with the sacred force, & how the Greek Theos (...)
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  21. G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982/2006). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
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  22. D. Futter (2011). Socratic “Argument” in Plato's Early Definitional Dialogues. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):122-131.score: 21.0
    It is widely assumed that the Socrates of Plato’s definitional dialogues is an arguer, that is, someone who argues, or presents arguments. This conception of Socrates is so entrenched in the scholarship that it is built into the best English translations of Plato’s texts, which render the Greek word ‘logos’ – a word with a bewilderingly large number of possible meanings – as ‘argument’ in contexts in which this is highly disputable. This essay explores the relation between questioning, assertion, (...)
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  23. David Roochnik (2002). An Introduction to Greek Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 21.0
    lecture 1. A dialectical approach to Greek philosophy -- lecture 2. From myth to philosophy, Hesiod and Thales -- lecture 3. The Milesians and the quest for being -- lecture 4. The great intrusion, Heraclitus -- lecture 5. Parmenides, the champion of being -- lecture 6. Reconciling Heraclitus and Parmenides -- lecture 7. The Sophists, Protagoras, the first "humanist" -- lecture 8. Socrates -- lecture 9. An introduction to Plato's Dialogues -- lecture 10. Plato versus the Sophists, I -- (...)
     
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  24. John Beversluis (2000). Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book is a rereading of the early dialogues of Plato from the point of view of the people with whom Socrates engages in debate. Existing studies are thoroughly dismissive of the interlocutors and reduce them to the status of mere mouthpieces for views that are hopelessly confused or demonstrably false. This book takes interlocutors seriously and treats them as genuine intellectual opponents whose views are often more defensible than commentators have generally thought.
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  25. Nicholas Denyer (ed.) (2008). Plato: Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
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  26. Robert Mayhew (2011). Prodicus the Sophist: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The past fifty years have witnessed the flourishing of scholarship in virtually every area of ancient Greek philosophy, but the sophists have for the most part been neglected. This is certainly true of Prodicus of Ceos: of the four most well-known sophists--Protagoras, Gorgias, Prodicus, and Antiphon--he has received the least attention. Robert Mayhew provides a reassessment of his life and thought, and especially his views on language, religion, and ethics. This volume consists of ninety texts with facing translations--far more (...)
     
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  27. Plato (2010). Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political rhetoric (...)
     
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  28. George T. Menake (2004). Three Traditions of Greek Political Thought: Plato in Dialogue. University Press of America.score: 16.0
    This book also makes the case that the three major traditions of Greek political thought set the stage for the future dialogue of Western political philosophy even to this day.
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  29. Francisco J. Gonzalez (2009). Plato and Heidegger: A Question of Dialogue. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 15.0
    Introduction: What is to be gained from a confrontation between Plato and Heidegger? -- Heidegger's critical reading of Plato in the 1920s -- Dialectic, ethics, and dialogue -- Heidegger's critique of dialectic in the 1920s --Ethics and ontology -- Ethics in Plato's sophist -- Heidegger and dialogue -- Logos and being -- The tensions in Heidegger's critique -- The guiding perspective of Plato as undermining the ontic/ontological distinction -- Heidegger on Plato's forms -- Conclusion: The relation between being and Heidegger (...)
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  30. A. P. Bos (1989). Cosmic and Meta-Cosmic Theology in Aristotle's Lost Dialogues. Brill.score: 15.0
    CHAPTER ONE A 'DREAMING KRONOS' IN A LOST WORK BY ARISTOTLE In the following study we shall be concerned with the interpretation of dreams. ...
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  31. Gordon Pearson & Martin Parker (2001). The Relevance of Ancient Greeks to Modern Business? A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):341 - 353.score: 15.0
    What follows is a dialogue, in the Platonic sense, concerning the justifications for "business ethics" as a vehicle for asking questions about the values of modern business organisations. The protagonists are the authors, Gordon Pearson – a pragmatist and sceptic where business ethics is concerned – and Martin Parker – a sociologist and idealist who wishes to be able to ask ethical questions of business. By the end of the dialogue we come to no agreement on the necessity or justification (...)
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  32. Xiong Liwen (2008). Dialogues Between Western and Eastern Culture From the Aspect of Logic. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:83-90.score: 15.0
    The article mainly tries to discuss the dialogue between China and Western countries from the aspect of logic. There were three sources of logic, including formal logic in ancient Greek, logic in Early Qin of China as well as logic in ancient India. While, among all the schools in ancient China, Mohist and Virtuoso valued logic most. But as the rulers of Han Dynasty only paid their homage to Confucianism, the two schools gradually sank, logic in Early Qin of (...)
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  33. V. Tejera (1997). Rewriting the History of Ancient Greek Philosophy. Greenwood Press.score: 14.0
    Tejera examines how Platonism--a philosophy imported from outside Plato's dialogues--changed our understanding of the dialogues.
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  34. Jean Beaufret & Mark Sinclair (eds.) (2006). Dialogue with Heidegger: Greek Philosophy. Indiana University Press.score: 13.0
    Heidegger discusses early Greek thinking in friendly letters to French philosopher, Jean Beaufret.
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  35. Terence Irwin (1995). Plato's Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    This exceptional book examines and explains Plato's answer to the normative question, "How ought we to live?" It discusses Plato's conception of the virtues; his views about the connection between the virtues and happiness; and the account of reason, desire, and motivation that underlies his arguments about the virtues. Plato's answer to the epistemological question, "How can we know how we ought to live?" is also discussed. His views on knowledge, belief, and inquiry, and his theory of Forms, are examined, (...)
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  36. Gail Fine (ed.) (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in a particular area. Specially commissioned essays from leading international figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. Plato is the best known, and continues to be (...)
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  37. D. N. Sedley (2004). The Midwife of Platonism: Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Plato's Theaetetus is an acknowledged masterpiece, and among the most influential texts in the history of epistemology. Since antiquity it has been debated whether this dialogue was written by Plato to support his familiar metaphysical doctrines, or represents a self-distancing from these. David Sedley's book offers a via media, founded on a radical separation of the author, Plato, from his main speaker, Socrates. The dialogue, it is argued, is addressed to readers familiar with Plato's mature doctrines, and sets out to (...)
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  38. Andrea Wilson Nightingale (1995). Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    In this very original study, the author investigates how Plato "invented" the discipline of philosophy. In order to define and legitimize philosophy, Dr. Nightingale maintains, Plato had to match it against genres of discourse that had authority and currency in democratic Athens. By incorporating traditional genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues, Plato marks the boundaries of philosophy as a discursive and as a social practice.
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  39. David Roochnik (1991). Stanley Fish and the Old Quarrel Between Rhetoric and Philosophy. Critical Review 5 (2):225-246.score: 12.0
    In Doing What Comes Naturally, Stanley Fish argues on behalf of rhetoric and against philosophy. The latter assumes an independent reality that can be perceived without distortion and then reported in a transparent verbal medium. The former insists that this is impossible. As Fish acknowledges, this debate is a version of the ?old quarrel? that has raged since the dialogues of Plato and the orations of the sophists. The present paper first examines how the Greek sophist (...)
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  40. Heidi Northwood (2006). In Dialogue with the Greeks (Vol. I: The Presocratics and Reality; Vol. II: Plato and Dialectic) – Rush Rhees, Edited by D. Z. Phillips. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 29 (4):369–382.score: 12.0
  41. M. F. Burnyeat (2001). What Was the 'Common Arrangement'? An Inquiry Into John Stuart Mill's Boyhood Reading of Plato. Utilitas 13 (01):1-.score: 12.0
    This article is detective work, not philosophy. J. S. Mill's Autobiography records that at the age of seven he read, in Greek, . Which were the other dialogues? On the arrangement common today, it would be Crito, Apology, Phaedo, Cratylus. On the arrangement common then, Theages and Erastai replace Cratylus, which makes seven dialogues. I show that this must be the answer by the evidence of James Mill's commonplace books and his writings on Plato. These reveal which collected edition (...)
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  42. Daniel S. Werner (2012). Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Plato's dialogues frequently criticize traditional Greek myth, yet Plato also integrates myth with his writing. Daniel S. Werner confronts this paradox through an in-depth analysis of the Phaedrus, Plato's most mythical dialogue. Werner argues that the myths of the Phaedrus serve several complex functions: they bring nonphilosophers into the philosophical life; they offer a starting point for philosophical inquiry; they unify the dialogue as a literary and dramatic whole; they draw attention to the limits of language and the limits (...)
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  43. Małgorzata Bogaczyk-Vormayr (2011). Veränderung zur Praktike. Kleine Bemerkungen zur Lebensphilosophie des Evagrios Pontikos. ARGUMENT 1 (2):191-209.score: 12.0
    English title: Change for praktike. Minor Comments to Evagrius Ponticus’ Philosophy of Life. The paper elucidates the evolution in understanding of a life phenomenon, which took place in the writing of the early Christian authors who referred to the heritage of the ancient philosophy trying to define their own position in relation to it. In this perspective the present author discusses the thought of Evagius Ponticus who undertakes some currents typical of Socrates’ concept of life, known from Plato’s dialogues. As (...)
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  44. A. E. Taylor (1926/2001). Plato: The Man and His Work. Dover.score: 12.0
    This outstanding work by a renowned Plato scholar presents the thought of the great Greek philosopher with historical accuracy and objective analysis. A brief introductory chapter about the philosopher's life is followed by an in-depth examination of his voluminous writings, particularly the dialogues. A substantial appendix explores works often attributed to Plato and presents cogent reasons for their acceptance or rejection as such. Preface. Notes. Addenda. Chronological Table. Appendix. Indexes.
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  45. Ian Crystal (2001). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Christopher Gill. Mind 110 (439):759-764.score: 12.0
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  46. Barbara Goff (2011). (E.) Greenwood Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Classical Presences). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Xii + 298. £55. 9780199575244. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:292-293.score: 12.0
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  47. Leonid Zhmud (1998). Plato as "Architect of Science". Phronesis 43 (3):211-244.score: 12.0
    The figure of the cordial host of the Academy, who invited the most gifted mathematicians and cultivated pure research, whose keen intellect was able if not to solve the particular problem then at least to show the method for its solution: this figure is quite familiar to students of Greek science. But was the Academy as such a center of scientific research, and did Plato really set for mathematicians and astronomers the problems they should study and methods they should (...)
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  48. Rutger Allan (2008). Word Order in Tragedy (H.) Dik Word Order in Greek Tragic Dialogue. Pp. Xvi + 281, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £55. ISBN: 978-0-19-927929-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):352-.score: 12.0
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  49. Patricia Sayre (2005). Review of Rush Rhees, In Dialogue with the Greeks, Volume I: The Presocratics and Reality; Volume II: Plato and Dialectic. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (8).score: 12.0
  50. L. Zhmud (1998). Plato as "Architect of Science". Phronesis 43 (3):211 - 244.score: 12.0
    The figure of the cordial host of the Academy, who invited the most gifted mathematicians and cultivated pure research, whose keen intellect was able if not to solve the particular problem then at least to show the method for its solution: this figure is quite familiar to students of Greek science. But was the Academy as such a center of scientific research, and did Plato really set for mathematicians and astronomers the problems they should study and methods they should (...)
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