Search results for 'Dialogues, Latin Translations into English' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lucius Annaeus Seneca (1997). Dialogues and Letters. Penguin Books.score: 840.0
    A fascinating insight into one of the greatest minds of Ancient Rome, these works inspired writers and thinkers including Montaigne, Rousseau, and Bacon, and ...
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  2. Jasper Hopkins, Nicholas of Cusa: Metaphysical Speculations: Volume Two.score: 381.0
    With the English translation of the two Latin works contained in this present book, which is a sequel to Nicholas of Cusa: Metaphysical Speculations: [Volume One],1 I have now translated all2 of the major treatises and dialogues of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1464), except for De Concordantia Catholica.3 My plans call for collecting, in the near future, these translations into a two-volume paperback edition—i.e., into a Reader—that will serve, more generally, students of the history of philosophy (...)
     
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  3. Plato, The Dialogues of Plato, Translated Into English with Analyses and Introductions, by B. Jowett.score: 368.4
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  4. St George Stock (1892). Church's Translation of Some Dialogues of Plato The Trial and Death of Socrates, Being the Euthyphron, Apology, Crito and Phaedo of Plato, Translated Into English by F. J. Church, M.A. London, Macmillan and Co. And New York, 1891. Pp. Lxxxix. 213. Price 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 6 (05):216-218.score: 368.4
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  5. Rufus B. Richardson (1893). Neohellenica An Introduction to Modern Greek, in the Form of Dialogues, Containing Specimens of the Language From the Third Century B.C. To the Present Day, to Which is Added an Appendix Giving Examples of the Cypriot Dialect. By Professor Michael Constantinides. Translated Into English in Collaboration with Major-Gen. H. T. Rogers, R. E. London and New York. Macmillan and Co. 1892. Pp. Xiv. 470. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (06):279-.score: 368.4
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  6. W. W. Goodwin (1893). Jowett's Dialogues of Plato The Dialogues of Plato, Translated Into English with Analyses and Introductions by B. Jowett, M.A., Master of Balliol College, Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford, Doctor of Theology of the University of Leyden. In Five Volumes. Third Edition, Revised and Corrected Throughout, with Marginal Analyses and an Index of Subjects and Proper Names. Oxford. At the Clarendon Press. 1892. (New York. Macmillan & Co.) £4 4s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (04):161-163.score: 368.4
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  7. D. Futter (2011). Socratic “Argument” in Plato's Early Definitional Dialogues. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):122-131.score: 228.0
    It is widely assumed that the Socrates of Plato’s definitional dialogues is an arguer, that is, someone who argues, or presents arguments. This conception of Socrates is so entrenched in the scholarship that it is built into the best English translations of Plato’s texts, which render the Greek word ‘logos’ – a word with a bewilderingly large number of possible meanings – as ‘argument’ in contexts in which this is highly disputable. This essay explores the relation between (...)
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  8. José Ruysschaert (1953). A Note on the "First" Edition of the Latin Translation of Some of Lucian of Samosata's Dialogues. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 16 (1/2):161-162.score: 132.6
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  9. G. C. Fiumara (1997). Ahl, Frederick and HM Roisman. The Odyssey Re-Formed. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1996. X 1 339 Pp. Cloth, $49.95; Paper, $19.95. Allen, RE, Tr. Plato: The Dialogues of Plato. Volume 3: Ion, Hippias Minor, Laches, Protagoras. Translated with Commentary. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1996. Xiv 1 234 Pp. Cloth, $35. Balme, Maurice and James Morwood. Oxford Latin Course. Part I. 2d Ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. 157 Pp. Numerous Ills. Paper, $19.95. Barnes, TD ... [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 118:155-165.score: 129.0
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  10. Daniel G. Calder (1984). David Yerkes, Syntax and Style in Old English: A Comparison of the Two Versions of Wœrferth's Translation of Gregory's Dialogues. (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 5.) Binghamton, N.Y.: Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1982. Pp. 109. [REVIEW] Speculum 59 (1):246.score: 129.0
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  11. Geoffrey Russom (1980). David Yerkes, The Two Versions of Wæferth's Translation of Gregory's Dialogues: An Old English Thesaurus, (Toronto Old English Series, 4.) Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 1979. Pp. Xxvi, 100. $17.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 55 (4):878-879.score: 129.0
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  12. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 127.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  13. John Sellars (ed.) (2006). Justus Lipsius On Constancy. Bristol Phoenix Press.score: 127.0
    This book makes available again a long out-of-print translation of a major sixteenth-century philosophical text. Lipsius' De Constantia (1584) is an important Humanist text and a key moment in the reception of Stoicism. A dialogue in two books, conceived as a philosophical consolation for those suffering through contemporary religious wars, it proved immensely popular in its day and formed the inspiration for what has become known as 'Neostoicism'. This movement advocated the revival of Stoic ethics in a form that would (...)
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  14. Confucius (1997/1968). The Analects of Confucius (Lun Yu). OUP USA.score: 118.0
    In the long river of human history, if one person can represent the civilization of a whole nation, it is perhaps Master Kong, better known as Confucius in the West. If there is one single book that can be upheld as the common code of a whole people, it is perhaps Lun Yu, or The Analects. Surely few individuals in history have shaped their country's civilization more profoundly than Master Kong. The great Han historiographer, Si-ma Qian, writing 2,100 years ago (...)
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  15. Nalini Bhushan & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) (2011). Indian Philosophy in English: From Renaissance to Independence. OUP USA.score: 108.0
    This book publishes, for the first time in decades, and in many cases, for the first time in a readily accessible edition, English language philosophical literature written in India during the period of British rule. Bhushan's and Garfield's own essays on the work of this period contextualize the philosophical essays collected and connect them to broader intellectual, artistic and political movements in India. This volume yields a new understanding of cosmopolitan consciousness in a colonial context, of the intellectual agency (...)
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  16. David L. Gosling (2011). Darwin and the Hindu Tradition: “Does What Goes Around Come Around?”. Zygon 46 (2):345-369.score: 81.0
    Abstract. The introduction of English as the medium of instruction for higher education in India in 1835 created a ferment in society and in the religious beliefs of educated Indians—Hindus, Muslims, and, later, Christians. There was a Hindu renaissance characterized by the emergence of reform movements led by charismatic figures who fastened upon aspects of Western thought, especially science, now available in English. The publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859 was readily assimilated by educated (...)
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  17. Eunsu Cho (2004). From Buddha's Speech to Buddha's Essence: Philosophical Discussions of Buddha-Vacana in India and China. Asian Philosophy 14 (3):255 – 276.score: 81.0
    This is a comparative study of the discourses on the nature of sacred language found in Indian Abhidharma texts and those written by 7th century Chinese Buddhist scholars who, unlike the Indian Buddhists, questioned 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching'. This issue labeled fo-chiao t'i lun, the theory of 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching', was one of the topics on which Chinese Yogācāra scholars have shown a keen interest and served as the inspiration for extensive intellectual dialogues in their (...)
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  18. Esben Rahbek Pedersen (2006). Making Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Operable: How Companies Translate Stakeholder Dialogue Into Practice. Business and Society Review 111 (2):137-163.score: 81.0
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  19. Josephine Koster Tarvers (1992). Margaret S. Blayney, Ed., A Familiar Dialogue of the Friend and the Fellow: A Translation of Alain Chartier's “Dialogus Familiaris Amici Et Sodalis.”(Early English Text Society, OS 295.) London, New York, and Toronto: Oxford University Press, for the Early English Text Society, 1989. Pp. Ix, 61. $29.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 67 (1):117-118.score: 81.0
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  20. Fred Newman (1999). Ever Since Newman Left Academia Some 30 Years Ago, Philosophy, Psychology, Politics and Theatre Have Been Inseparable Activities for Him. In This, His Mostly Explicitly Philosophical Play, a Series of Autonomous Philosophical Dialogues Gracefully Unfold Into a Play with Political and Psychological Impact. Yet, the Activity of the Conversation is What Dominates. [REVIEW] In Lois Holzman (ed.), Performing Psychology: A Postmodern Culture of the Mind. Routledge. 197.score: 79.2
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  21. Walter J. Ong (1983/2004). Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue: From the Art of Discourse to the Art of Reason. University of Chicago Press.score: 77.6
    Renaissance logician, philosopher, humanist, and teacher, Peter Ramus (1515-72) is best known for his attack on Aristotelian logic, his radical pedagogical theories, and his new interpretation for the canon of rhetoric. His work, published in Latin and translated into many languages, has influenced the study of Renaissance literature, rhetoric, education, logic, and--more recently--media studies. Considered the most important work of Walter Ong's career, Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue is an elegant review of the history of Ramist (...)
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  22. Waldomiro Silva Filho (2009). Esclarecer a natureza do mundo. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 13 (1):175-184.score: 72.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Willard Van Orman Quine (1902-2000) had a decisive role in setting the agenda of the themes, instruments and procedures of contemporary philosophy, providing an original meeting between American thinking and European, as well as in the (...)
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  23. Raquel Gutiérrez (2006). VII Diálogos Iberoamericanos. Miradas Periféricas= VII Latin American Dialogues. Peripheral Views. Contrastes: Revista Cultural 45:135-139.score: 72.0
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  24. Plato (2011). Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..score: 69.0
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s (...)
     
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  25. Richard Colledge (2008). On Ex(s)Istere. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:263-274.score: 65.6
    This paper looks to revive and advance dialogue surrounding John Nijenhuis’s case against ‘existence language’ as a rendering of Aquinas’s esse. Nijenhuis presented both a semantic/grammatical case for abandoning this practice as well as a more systematic argument based on his reading of Thomist metaphysics. On one hand, I affirm the important distinction between being and existence and lend qualified support to his interpretation of the quantitiative/qualitative correlation between esse and essentia in Aquinas’s texts. On the other hand, I take (...)
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  26. Barry Hallen (1999). “Handsome Is as Handsome Does”. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:187-196.score: 65.6
    Today the study of African aesthetics constitutes one of the most exciting and dynamic subdisciplines in African and intercultural studies. Yet, because it is also a discipline in which African meanings must of necessity be translated into and expressed by one of the few ‘world’ languages (English, French), it is in the interests of all concerned—Africans and non-Africans—to work together to ensure that the highest possible professional standards are maintained. For it is intercultural dialogue based upon reciprocal language (...)
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  27. Jos Kessels (2001). Socrates Comes to Market. Philosophy of Management 1 (1):49-71.score: 65.6
    Socrates op de markt, Filosofie in bedrijf was first published in the Netherlands in 1997 and reprinted in 1999. It was translated into German and published in Germany in late 2000. The book covers the need today for Socratic dialogue, its methods, its uses and related concepts. These include elenchus (the refutationof what one thought one knew); maieutics (Socratic midwifery making latent knowledge conscious); the relationship of knowledge to feeling, virtue and the formation of personality; and the distinction between (...)
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  28. Michael Berman (forthcoming). Reflection, Objectivity, and the Love of God, a Passage From Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception. Heythrop Journal 51 (5).score: 64.0
    Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945) essentially aims at debunking the myth of objectivity. The Phenomenology takes the entire Western tradition to task over its reliance on the objective attitude, showing how this attitude structures the architectonics of idealism and empiricism. These philosophies share the same presuppositions: their metaphysics and epistemologies are inherently dualistic. The problematics that stem from this objectivism have informed the Western understanding of God. This essay undertakes an examination of one of the more extended treatments of God (...)
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  29. Harold Tarrant, Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Volume 1, Book 1: Proclus on the Socratic State and Atlantis.score: 64.0
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the meaning and significance of Platonic philosophy. The present volume, (...)
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  30. Richard Fox Young (2006). The 'Scotch Metaphysics' in 19th Century Benares. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (2):139-157.score: 64.0
    That India once had a sustained ‘dialogue’ with Scottish Philosophy is not gener- ally known, or that the exchange occurred in the medium of Sanskrit, not English. The essay explores an important cross-cultural encounter in the colonial context of mid 19th-century Benares where two Scots, John Muir and James Ballantyne, served as principals of a Sanskrit college established by the East India Company. Educated toward the end of the Scottish Enlightenment, they endeavoured to translate such distinctive concepts of ‘Scotch (...)
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  31. Han-Liang Chang (2012). Plato and Peirce on Likeness and Semblance. Biosemiotics 5 (3):301-312.score: 64.0
    In his well-known essay, ‘What Is a Sign?’(CP 2.281, 285) Peirce uses ‘likeness’ and ‘resemblance’ interchangeably in his definition of icon. The synonymity of the two words has rarely, if ever, been questioned. Curiously, a locus classicus of the pair, at least in F. M. Cornford’s English translation, can be found in a late dialogue of Plato, namely, the Sophist. In this dialogue on the myth and truth of the sophists’ profession, the mysterious ‘stranger’, who is most likely Socrates’ (...)
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  32. Brett W. Schultz (2011). Gonzo Strategies of Deceit: An Interview with Joaquin Segura. Continent 1 (2):117-124.score: 64.0
    Joaquin Segura. Untitled (fig. 40) . 2007 continent. 1.2 (2011): 117-124. The interview that follows is a dialogue between artist and gallerist with the intent of unearthing the artist’s working strategies for a general public. Joaquin Segura is at once an anomaly in Mexico’s contemporary art scene at the same time as he is one of the most emblematic representatives of a larger shift toward a post-national identity among its youngest generation of artists. If Mexico looks increasingly like a foreclosed (...)
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  33. Proclus (2007). Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Cambridge University Press.score: 64.0
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the meaning and significance of Platonic philosophy. The present volume, (...)
     
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  34. Plato (2000). Selected Dialogues of Plato: The Benjamin Jowett Translation. Modern Library.score: 60.0
    Benjamin Jowett's translations of Plato have long been classics in their own right. In this volume, Professor Hayden Pelliccia has revised Jowett's renderings of five key dialogues, giving us a modern Plato faithful to both Jowett's best features and Plato's own masterly style. Gathered here are many of Plato's liveliest and richest texts. Ion takes up the question of poetry and introduces the Socratic method. Protagoras discusses poetic interpretation and shows why cross-examination is the best way to get at (...)
     
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  35. B.�Atrice Cahour & Lyn Pemberton (2001). Keeping the Peace: A Model of Conversational Positioning in Collaborative Design Dialogues. [REVIEW] AI and Society 15 (4):344-358.score: 54.0
    This paper presents findings from a linguistic and psychosocial analysis of nine design dialogues that sets out to investigate the interweaving of transactional and interpersonal threads in collaborative work. We sketch a model of the participants' positioning towards their own or their partner's design proposals, together with the conversational cues which indicate this positioning. Our aim is to integrate the role of interpersonal relationships into the study of cooperation, to stress the importance of this dimension for the quality of (...)
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  36. Sanjoy Mukherjee (2007). Dialogues From the Land of Love and Death. AI and Society 21 (1-2):121-140.score: 54.0
    Knowledge and action constitute two important and inter-related domains of human existence. The very pace of our modern life with all its material abundance hardly allows us space for the dawning of higher knowledge or scope for imparting deeper meaning into the endless series of our mechanical actions. The limitations of linear thinking, binary logic and specialized disciplines of knowledge prevent our access to a holistic perception of our life-world. The article draws insights from three classical traditions of learning (...)
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  37. Edwin A. Burtt (ed.) (1994). The English Philosophers: From Bacon to Mill. Modern Library.score: 54.0
    The thirteen essays in this Modern Library edition comprise a complete survey of the golden age of English philosophy. The anthology begins in the early seventeenth century with Francis Bacon's comprehensive program for the total reorganization of all knowledge; it culminates, some two hundred and fifty years later, with John Stuart Mill. The thinkers represented here are the creators of the twentieth-century world. Indebted to them is a long line of economists, sociologists, and political leaders whose work has profoundly (...)
     
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  38. O. F. M. Dominic Whitehouse (2013). Peter Olivi's Dialogue with Aristotle on the Emotions. Franciscan Studies 70 (1):189-245.score: 48.0
    Peter of John Olivi composed Question 57 of his Quaestiones in secundum librum Sententiarum (“Questions on the Second Book of the Sentences”) in the decade after William of Moerbeke had translated, not long before 1270, Aristotle’s On Rhetoric into Latin.2 It was above all Moerbeke’s translation that gave thirteenth-century Europe access to the analysis of the emotions that Aristotle had placed in Book Two of the work. Two earlier translations existed: one that Hermannus Alemannus had made from (...)
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  39. Wolfgang Reisinger (1996). Ancient Myth and Philosophy in Peter Russell's Agamemnon in Hades. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 48.0
     
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  40. Henry Prakken (2008). A Formal Model of Adjudication Dialogues. Artificial Intelligence and Law 16 (3):305-328.score: 46.0
    This article presents a formal dialogue game for adjudication dialogues. Existing AI & law models of legal dialogues and argumentation-theoretic models of persuasion are extended with a neutral third party, to give a more realistic account of the adjudicator’s role in legal procedures. The main feature of the model is a division into an argumentation phase, where the adversaries plea their case and the adjudicator has a largely mediating role, and a decision phase, where the adjudicator decides the dispute (...)
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  41. Plato (2010). Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras. Cambridge University Press.score: 45.8
    Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political (...)
     
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  42. J. Brooke Hamilton Iii & David Hoch (1997). Ethical Standards for Business Lobbying. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):117-129.score: 44.2
    Rather than being inherently evil, business lobbying is a socially responsible activity which needs to be restrained by ethical standards. To be effective in a business environment, traditional ethical standards need to be translated into language which business persons can speak comfortably. Economical explanations must also be available to explain why ethical standards are appropriate in business. Eight such standards and their validating arguments are proposed with examples showing their use. Internal dialogues regarding the ethics of lobbying objectives and (...)
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  43. Jonathan Harris, Plato, Byzantium and the Italian Renaissance.score: 44.2
    The ideas of Plato (429-347 BC) have exerted such an abiding influence on western philosophy and political thought that it is easy to forget that for many centuries, between about 500 and 1400, his works were almost unknown in western Europe. This was partly because very few people in Medieval Europe knew enough Greek to read Plato and even if they had, copies of the Dialogues were almost impossible to obtain, with only the Timaeus available in Latin translation. Scholars (...)
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  44. Andreas Vrahimis (2013). "Was There a Sun Before Men Existed?": A. J. Ayer and French Philosophy in the Fifties. Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (9).score: 43.0
    In contrast to many of his contemporaries, A. J. Ayer was an analytic philosopher who had sustained throughout his career some interest in developments in the work of his ‘continental’ peers. Ayer, who spoke French, held friendships with some important Parisian intellectuals, such as Camus, Bataille, Wahl and Merleau-Ponty. This paper examines the circumstances of a meeting between Ayer, Merleau-Ponty, Wahl, Ambrosino and Bataille, which took place in 1951 at some Parisian bar. The question under discussion during this meeting was (...)
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  45. Agenor Sarraf Pacheco (2013). Religiosidade afroindígena e natureza na Amazônia (Afroindigenous Religiosity and Nature in the Brazilian Amazon ) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p476. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):476-508.score: 43.0
    A Amazônia constituiu-se, ao longo de sua formação histórica e sociocultural, em importante território de crenças em saberes de cura que expressam interculturalidades entre humanos e sobrenaturais. Nas fronteiras que separam e interligam o período colonial e os tempos contemporâneos, fios de memórias escritas e orais trazem à tona experiências em que religiosidades nativas, coloniais e diaspóricas se conformam em profunda bricolagem com a natureza, erigindo um panteão de divindades afroindígenas na região. Neste artigo, sob a orientação teórica dos Estudos (...)
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  46. Plato (2008). Gorgias. OUP Oxford.score: 43.0
    The struggle which Plato has Socrates recommend to his interlocutors in Gorgias - and to his readers - is the struggle to overcome the temptations of worldly success and to concentrate on genuine morality. Ostensibly an enquiry into the value of rhetoric, the dialogue soon becomes an investigation into the value of these two contrasting ways of life. In a series of dazzling and bold arguments, Plato attempts to establish that only morality can bring a person true happiness, (...)
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  47. Plato (2008). Gorgias. OUP Oxford.score: 43.0
    The struggle which Plato has Socrates recommend to his interlocutors in Gorgias - and to his readers - is the struggle to overcome the temptations of worldly success and to concentrate on genuine morality. Ostensibly an enquiry into the value of rhetoric, the dialogue soon becomes an investigation into the value of these two contrasting ways of life. In a series of dazzling and bold arguments, Plato attempts to establish that only morality can bring a person true happiness, (...)
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  48. M. F. Burnyeat (2003). Apology 30b 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of "Gígnesthai". Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:1-25.score: 43.0
    The framework of this paper is a defence of Burnet's construal of Apology 30b 2-4. Socrates does not claim, as he is standardly translated, that virtue makes you rich, but that virtue makes money and everything el se good for you. This view of the relation between virtue and wealth is paralleled in dialogues of every period, and a sophisticated development of it appears in Aristotle. My philological defence of the philosophically preferable translation extends recent scholarly work on eínai in (...)
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  49. John M. Dillon (1973). Iamblichi Chalcidensis in Platonis Dialogos Commentariorum Fragmenta. Leiden,Brill.score: 43.0
    The fragments of Iamblichus' commentaries on Plato's dialogues (Sophist, Phaedo, Phaedrus and Timaeus). Greek text with English translation and notes.
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  50. Feliz Molina (2011). Investigative Poetics: In (Night)-Light of Akilah Oliver. Continent 1 (2):70-75.score: 43.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 70-75. cartography of ghosts . . . And as a way to talk . . . of temporality the topography of imagination, this body whose dirty entry into the articulation of history as rapturous becoming & unbecoming, greeted with violence, i take permission to extend this grace —Akilah Oliver from “An Arriving Guard of Angels Thusly Coming To Greet” Our disappearance is already here. —Jacques Derrida, 117 I wrestled with death as a threshold, an aporia, a (...)
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