11 found
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  1.  8
    Evisa Kica & Diana M. Bowman (2013). Transnational Governance Arrangements: Legitimate Alternatives to Regulating Nanotechnologies? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 7 (1):69-82.
    In recent years, the development and the use of engineered nanomaterials have generated many debates on whether these materials should be part of the new or existing regulatory frameworks. The uncertainty, lack of scientific knowledge and rapid expansion of products containing nanomaterials have added even more to the regulatory dilemma with policy makers and public/private actors contenting periods of both under and over regulation. Responding to these regulatory challenges, as well as to the global reach of nanotechnology research and industrial (...)
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  2.  24
    Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge (2008). A Big Regulatory Tool-Box for a Small Technology. NanoEthics 2 (2):193-207.
    There is little doubt that the development and commercialisation of nanotechnologies is challenging traditional state-based regulatory regimes. Yet governments currently appear to be taking a non-interventionist approach to directly regulating this emerging technology. This paper argues that a large regulatory toolbox is available for governing this small technology and that as nanotechnologies evolve, many regulatory advances are likely to occur outside of government. It notes the scientific uncertainties facing us as we contemplate nanotechnology regulatory matters and then examines the notion (...)
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  3.  16
    Diana M. Bowman, Elen Stokes & Michael G. Bennett (2013). Anticipating the Societal Challenges of Nanotechnologies. NanoEthics 7 (1):1-5.
    “In this article we sketch out the landscape for this Special Issue on anticipating and embedding the societal challenge of nanotechnologies. Tools that actors may choose to employ for these processes are articulated, and further explored through the introduction of the seven articles which comprise this Issue. Taken together, these articles create a cogent narrative on the societal challenges posed by nanotechnologies. They are drawn together by three distinct themes, each of which is briefly considered within this context of this (...)
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  4.  27
    Diana M. Bowman (2008). Governing Nanotechnologies: Weaving New Regulatory Webs or Patching Up the Old? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (2):179-181.
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  5.  21
    Diana M. Bowman & Karinne Ludlow (2009). Filling the Information Void: Using Public Registries as a Tool in Nanotechnologies Regulation. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):25-36.
    Based on the experiences of two high profile voluntary data collection programs for engineered nanomaterials, this article considers the merit of an international online registry for scientific data on engineered nanomaterials and environmental, health and safety (EHS) data. Drawing on the earlier experiences from the pharmaceutical industry, the article considers whether a registry of nanomaterials at the international level is practical or indeed desirable, and if so, whether such an initiative—based on the current state of play—should be voluntary or mandatory. (...)
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  6.  18
    Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge (2007). Editorial – Governing Nanotechnology: More Than a Small Matter? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (3):239-241.
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  7.  3
    Karinne Ludlow, Diana M. Bowman, Jake Gatof & Michael G. Bennett (2015). Regulating Emerging and Future Technologies in the Present. NanoEthics 9 (2):151-163.
    Scientific knowledge and technological expertise continue to evolve rapidly. Such innovation gives rise to new benefits as well as risks, at an ever-increasing pace. Within this context, regulatory regimes must function in order to address policymakers’ objectives. Innovation, though, can challenge the functioning and effectiveness of regulatory regimes. Questions over fit, effectiveness, and capacity of these regimes to ensure the safe entry of such technologies, and their products, onto the market will be asked in parallel to their development. With this (...)
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  8.  16
    Diana M. Bowman (2009). Response. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):141-143.
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  9.  14
    Diana M. Bowman (2007). Book Review. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):75-76.
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  10.  7
    Diana M. Bowman & Geert van Calster (2008). Flawless or Fallible? A Review of the Applicability of the European Union's Cosmetics Directive in Relation to Nano-Cosmetics. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
    Consumer demand for new products within the cosmetics and toiletries industry has encouraged the industry increasingly to incorporate and experiment with new products and processes, including nanotechnologies. A number of cosmetic products which claim to incorporate engineered nano-materials have already entered the market and include, for instance, anti-ageing creams, make up, hair care products, cleansers and moisturisers. While the use of engineered nano-materials within cosmetics offers a range of benefits, including increased transparency and solubility, there has been increasing debate over (...)
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  11. Diana M. Bowman (2004). Bioethical and Legal Perspectives on Xenotransplantation. Monash Bioethics Review 23 (3):16-29.