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Profile: Diana Tietjens Meyers (University of Connecticut)
Profile: Diana Tietjens Meyers (University of Connecticut)
  1. Diana Meyers, Part 2.4: Autonomy Competency.
    Part II. Section 4. Autonomy Competency: Meyers takes John Rawls to task for giving a superficial account of autonomy. Endorsing deliberative rationality, he furnishes no account of how to achieve it. Meyers argues that her conception of autonomy competency fills the gap in Rawls's theory. Moreover, it is compatible with the emotional bonds of a relational self, and, acknowledging human fallibility, it provides an account of how autonomous people can recognize and correct their missteps. In the context of a critique (...)
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  2. Diana Meyers, Part 3.3: Autonomy and Feminine Socialization.
    Part III. Section 3. Autonomy and Feminine Socialization: Having agreed with Beauvoir that narcissism and altruism contribute to women's lack of autonomy, Meyers examines Beauvoir's account of autonomy in light of her own conception of autonomy competency and argues that Beauvoir's conception of autonomy is too stringent. Autonomy competency, in contrast, allows for degrees of autonomy and variations in degree as viewed over a life-time, as well as for a distinction between programmatic and episodic autonomy. Meyers concludes by characterizing minimal, (...)
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  3. Diana Meyers, Part 3.5: Autonomy-Enhancing Socialization.
    Part III. Section 5. Autonomy-Enhancing Socialization: Meyers seeks a remedy for gendered inequality with respect to autonomy in processes of socialization. After critically examining proposals offered by Beauvoir, Chodorow, and Radcliffe Richards, Meyers describes a pedagogical model that fosters assertiveness and intimacy while avoiding the inculcation of aggression and that actively nurtures the development of autonomy skills.
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  4. Diana Meyers, Part 2.2 an Alternative Account of Autonomy.
    Contrasting ontological accounts of autonomy with procedural accounts, Meyers defends the procedural model. For Meyers, the key question for a theory of autonomy is how people make decisions. She introduces the idea of autonomy competency - a repertoire of coordinated skills that make self-discovery, self-definition, and self-direction and hence autonomy possible. The authentic self is a self that has some degree of proficiency with respect to this competency and that emerges and evolves through the exercise of this competency. Meyers distinguishes (...)
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  5. Diana Meyers, Personal Autonomy and Related Concepts.
    Part I. The book begins with literary, cinematic, and historical scenarios that exemplify personal autonomy. Meyers uses these vignettes to distinguish personal autonomy from other, variously related types of autonomy and to show that other kinds of autonomy cannot adequately address the concern people have with their own personal decisions. Noting how profoundly social experience impinges on self-discovery, self-definition, and self-direction, Meyers characterizes autonomous individuals as persons who do what they really want, and she undertakes to supply an account of (...)
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  6. Diana Meyers, Part 3.2: Feminine and Masculine Socialization.
    Part III. Section 2. Feminine and Masculine Socialization: Two main problems are explored: 1) How are girls and boys socialized in contemporary western societies? and 2) What are adult women and men like? Meyers appropriates the main outlines of Simone de Beauvoir's account of feminine socialization in The Second Sex, but she also discusses more recent research.
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  7. Diana Meyers, Part 3.4: Full Autonomy - an Attainable Ideal.
    Part III. Section 4. Full Autonomy - An Attainable Ideal: Maximal or full autonomy is an unrealistic goal for all people. Contrary to a common assumption, however, masculine socialization does not generally result in full autonomy, but rather in medial autonomy. Conformism is as much of an obstacle to the full autonomy of men as it is for women. Still, men in western cultures are more likely to be more autonomous than women, and this discrepancy calls for change.
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  8. Diana Meyers, Part 2.5: Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy.
    Part II. Section 5. Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy: Two questions drive this chapter: 1) What kinds of things can be objects of autonomous choices? and 2) How are these related to an individual's authentic self? If self-interest is construed as securing a set of basic goods for oneself, personal autonomy and self-interest can collide. Still, Meyers holds that autonomy based on exercising autonomy competency is compatible with the dominance principle, which counsels opting for a course of action that satisfies at (...)
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  9. Diana Meyers, Part 4.3 Justice and Autonomy.
    The value of autonomy - even personal autonomy - cannot be confined to the private sphere. Because autonomy bears a reciprocal relation to equal opportunity, it must be counted among the cardinal political values.
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  10. Diana Meyers, Part 2.1: Recent Accounts of Autonomy.
    Part II. Section 1. Recent Accounts of Autonomy: Emphasizing the problematic relationship between autonomy and socialization, Meyers explores prominent views of autonomy, including Robert Young's, Stanley Benn's, Harry Frankfurt's, Gerald Dworkin's, and Gary Watson's. Having identified three main models for "rescuing autonomy from socialization," she identifies a single defect underlying all of them - namely, their assumption that personal autonomy requires transcending socialization through free will.
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  11. Diana Meyers, Part 2.6: Responsibility for Self.
    Part II. Section 6. Responsibility for Self: Meyers criticizes Derek Parfit's arguments against the rationality of temporal neutrality -- in other words, the principle of responsibility to self. She urges that autonomy requires providing for one's future.
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  12. Diana Meyers, Part 4.2: Self-Respect and Autonomy.
    Part IV. Section 2. Self-Respect and Autonomy: Meyers's discussion of self-respect takes into account work by Stephen Darwall, Thomas Hill, Jr., and Stephen Massey and proposes a unified triadic account that undermines the distinction between self-respect and self-esteem. After distinguishing compromised respect from unqualified respect, she shows why self-respect is both required for and a product of exercising autonomy competency.
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  13. Diana Meyers, Part 2.3 Self-Direction and Personal Integration.
    Because it is characteristic of competencies that they have overarching functions, Meyers considers what the overarching function of autonomy competency might be. She defends a view of personal integration that does not entail counterproductive consistency or unity. She rejects several other solutions to this problem, including compartmentalization, sanity, happiness, and eccentric nonconformity.
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  14. Diana Meyers, Part 3.1 Theories of Socialization.
    Part III. Section 1. Theories of Socialization. Autonomy as autonomy competency acknowledges the necessity of socialization for autonomy. Preliminary to considering this claim in relation to gender, Meyers sketches three social scientific models of socialization - psychoanalysis, social learning, and cognitive development.
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  15. Diana Meyers, Part 4.1: The Personal and Political Value of Autonomy.
    Part IV. Section 1. The Personal and the Political Value of Autonomy: Disparities in autonomy competency number among the many ways in which women and men in western societies are unequal. Meyers holds that although personal autonomy is not the sole or paramount value, medial autonomy is not only a personal good, but is also a political good.
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  16. Diana Meyers (forthcoming). Feminist Perspectives on the Self. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17. Diana Meyers (ed.) (forthcoming). Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
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  18. Diana Tietjens Meyers (forthcoming). Feminism and Sex Trafficking: Rethinking Some Aspects of Autonomy and Paternalism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper argues that potential cases of oppression, such as sex trafficking, can sometimes comprise autonomous choices by the trafficked individuals. This issue still divides radical from liberal feminists, with the former wanting to ‘rescue’ the ‘victims’ and the latter insisting that there might be good reasons for ‘hiding from the rescuers.’ This article presents new arguments for the liberal approach and raises two demands: first, help organizations should be run by affected women and be open-minded about whether or not (...)
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  19. Diana T. Meyers (2014). Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy. Routledge.
    Diana Tietjens Meyers examines the political underpinnings of psychoanalytic feminism, analyzing the relation between the nature of the self and the structure of good societies. She argues that impartial reason--the approach to moral reflection which has dominated 20th-century Anglo-American philosophy--is inadequate for addressing real world injustices. Subjection and Subjectivity is central to feminist thought across a wide range of disciplines.
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  20. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2013). Corporeal Selfhood, Self-Interpretation, and Narrative Selfhood. Philosophical Explorations:1-13.
    Ever since Freud pioneered the “talking cure,” psychologists of various stripes have explored how autobiographical narrative bears on self-understanding and psychic wellbeing. Recently, there has been a wave of philosophical speculation as to whether autobiographical narrative plays an essential or important role in the constitution of agentic selves. However, embodiment has received little attention from philosophers who defend some version of the narrative self. Catriona Mackenzie is an important exception to this pattern of neglect, and this paper explores Mackenzie’s work (...)
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  21. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2013). Khader , Serene . Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment . New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 238. $99.00 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (2):378-382.
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  22. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2013). Personale Autonomie ohne Transzendenz. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Autonomie de Person. Mentis.
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  23. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2012). FEAST Cluster on Feminist Critiques of Evolutionary Psychology—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 27 (1):1-2.
  24. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2012). Jenny Saville Remakes the Female Nude – Feminist Reflections on the State of the Art. In Peg Brand (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press.
    Jenny Saville is a leading contemporary painter of female nudes. This paper explores her work in light of theories of gender and embodied agency. Recent work on the phenomenology of embodiment draws a distinction between the body image and the body schema. The body image is your representation of your own body, including your visual image of it and your emotional attitudes towards it. The body schema is comprised of your proprioceptive knowledge, your corporeally encoded memories, and your corporeal proficiency (...)
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  25. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2012). Psychocorporeal Selfhood, Practical Intelligence, and Adaptive Autonomy. In Michael Kuhler & Najda Jelinek (eds.), Autonomy and the Self. springer.
    It is not uncommon for people to suffer identity crises. Yet, faced with similarly disruptive circumstances, some people plunge into an identity crisis while others do not. How must selfhood be construed given that people are vulnerable to identity crises? And how must agency be construed given that some people skirt potential identity crises and renegotiate the terms of their personal identity without losing their equilibrium -- their sense of self? If an adequate theory of the self and agency must (...)
     
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  26. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2012). The Politics of Persons: Individual Autonomy and Socio-Historical Selves. By John Christman. Hypatia 27 (1):227-230.
  27. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2011). Responsibility and Identity in Global Justice—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 26 (4):667-671.
  28. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2011). Two Victim Paradigms and the Problem of ‘Impure’ Victims. Humanity 2 (2):255-275.
    Philosophers have had surprisingly little to say about the concept of a victim although it is presupposed by the extensive philosophical literature on rights. Proceeding in four stages, I seek to remedy this deficiency and to offer an alternative to the two current paradigms that eliminates the Othering of victims. First, I analyze two victim paradigms that emerged in the late 20th century along with the initial iteration of the international human rights regime – the pathetic victim paradigm and the (...)
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  29. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2010). Introduction. Hypatia 25 (1):1-10.
  30. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Artifice and Authenticity: Gender Technology and Agency in Two Jenny Saville Portraits. In Laurie Shrage (ed.), You’ve Changed”: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oxford UP.
    This paper addresses two related topics: 1. The disanalogies between elective cosmetic practices and sex reassignment surgery. Why does it seem necessary for me – an aging professional woman – to ignore the blandishments of hairdressers wielding dyes and dermatologists wielding acids and scalpels? Why does it not seem equally necessary for a transgendered person to repudiate sex reassignment procedures? 2. The role of the body in identity and agency. How do phenomenological insights regarding the constitution of selfhood in relation (...)
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  31. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Narrative Structures, Narratives of Abuse, and Human Rights. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non- Ideal. Kluwer.
    This paper explores the relation between victims’ stories and normativity. As a contribution to understanding how the stories of those who have been abused or oppressed can advance moral understanding, catalyze moral innovation, and guide social change, this paper focuses on narrative as a variegated form of representation and asks whether personal narratives of victimization play any distinctive role in human rights discourse. In view of the fact that a number of prominent students of narrative build normativity into their accounts, (...)
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  32. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2008). Personal Autonomy in Society by Marina Oshana. Hypatia 23 (2):202-206.
  33. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2008). Personal Autonomy in Society (Review). Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 202-206.
  34. Diana Meyers, Joel Kupperman, Margaret Gilbert, Sonia Michel & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (2008). Paul Bloomfield. In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
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  35. Diana T. Meyers (2005). Women Philosophers, Sidelined Challenges, and Professional Philosophy. Hypatia 20 (3):149-152.
  36. Diana T. Meyers (2005). Who's There? Selfhood, Self-Regard, and Social Relations. Hypatia 20 (4):200-215.
    : J. David Velleman develops a canny, albeit mentalistic, theory of selfhood that furnishes some insights feminist philosophers should heed but that does not adequately heed some of the insights feminist philosophers have developed about the embodiment and relationality of the self. In my view, reflexivity cannot do the whole job of accounting for selfhood, for it rests on an unduly sharp distinction between reflexive loci of understanding and value, on the one hand, and embodiment and relationality, on the other. (...)
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  37. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2004). Being Yourself: Essays on Identity, Action, and Social Life. rowman & littlefield.
    A collection of some of my previously published papers with an introduction and a new chapter.
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  38. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2004). Narrative and Moral Life. In Cheshire Calhoun (ed.), Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. Oxford University Press.
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  39. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2004). The Three Freds and the Fate of Their Happiness. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):8–10.
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  40. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2003). Frontiers of Individuality: Embodiment and Relationships in Cultural Context. History and Theory 42 (2):271–285.
  41. Heidi Grasswick, Cressida J. Heyes, Cheryl L. Hughes, Alison M. Jaggar, Marìa Pìa Lara, Bonnie Mann, Norah Martin, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Kate Parsons, Misha Strauss, Margaret Urban Walker, Abby Wilkerson & IrisMarion Young (2002). Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  42. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2002). Gender in the Mirror: Cultural Imagery and Women's Agency. OUP USA.
    The cultural imagery of women is deeply ingrained in our consciousness. So deeply, in fact, that feminists see this as a fundamental threat to female autonomy because it enshrines procreative heterosexuality as well as the relations of domination and subordination between men and women. Diana Meyers' book is about this cultural imagery - and how, once it is internalized, it shapes perception, reflection, judgement, and desire. These intergral images have a deep impact not only on the individual psyche, but also (...)
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  43. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2001). Miranda Fricker and Jennifer Hornsby, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy:The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Ethics 112 (1):145-148.
  44. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2001). Feminism and Women’s Autonomy: The Challenge of Female Genital Cutting. Metaphilosophy 31:469-491.
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  45. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2001). The Rush to Motherhood -- Pronatalist Discourse and Women’s Autonomy. Signs 26:735-773.
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  46. Sandra Lee Bartky, Daniel Callahan, Joan C. Callahan, Peggy DesAutels, Robin Fiore, Frida Kerner Furman, Martha Holstein, Diana Tietjens Meyers, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, James Lindemann Nelson, Sara Ruddick, Anita Silvers, Joan Tronto, Margaret Urban Walker & Susan Wendell (2000). Mother Time: Women, Aging, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  47. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2000). Eileen L. McDonagh, Breaking the Abortion Deadlock: From Choice to Consent:Breaking the Abortion Deadlock: From Choice to Consent. Ethics 110 (3):624-627.
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  48. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2000). Authenticity for Real People. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 9:195-202.
    In this paper I shall offer an account of the authentic self that is compatible with human intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social experience. I begin by examiningHarry Frankfurt’s influential treatment of authenticity as a form of personal integration, and argue that his conception of the integrated self is too restrictive. I then offer an alternative processual account that views integration as the intelligibility of the self that emerges when a person exercises autonomy skills.
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  49. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2000). Intersectional Identity and the Authentic Self? Opposites Attract. In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), relational autonomy. oxford university press.
  50. Lawrence Blum, Claudia Card, Marilyn Friedman, Carol C. Gould, Mark S. Halfon, Virginia Held, Eva Feder Kittay, Leo Kittay, John W. Lango, Patricia S. Mann, Larry May, Diana T. Meyers, Kai Nielsen, Nel Noddings, Sara Ruddick, Michael Slote & Sue Weinberg (1998). Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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