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  1. Paul Boyle, Sarah Gruber, Thomas Webler, Heidi Lyn, Jessica Sickler, Diana Reiss, John Fraser & Katherine Lemcke (2006). Social Narratives Surrounding Dolphins: Q Method Study. Society and Animals 14 (4):351-382.
    In preparation for development of an exhibit on the cognitive abilities of dolphins, the Wildlife Conservation Society sought to determine potential visitor's social perspectives about dolphin intelligence, and how these beliefs might influence acceptance of scientific information. The study reported here used Q methodology to identify these underlying social perspectives. The study of adults and the study of children each revealed three distinct perspectives. While consensus emerged among adults on points about dolphins' high intelligence and communication abilities, the three perspectives (...)
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  2. J. J. Fraser, Diana Reiss, Paul Boyle, Katherine Lemcke, Jessica Sickler, Elizabeth Elliott, Barbara Newman & Sarah Gruber (2006). Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media. Society and Animals 14 (4):321.
    This review of how dolphins are portrayed in popular media reveals four themes that may influence public acceptance of current scientific research into dolphin cognition. These themes are: dolphin as peer to humans, of equal intelligence or at least capable of communicating with or helping humans; the dolphin as the representation of a romantic notion of ideal freedom in nature, embodying principles of peace, harmony or love; the dolphin as a naïve, innocent being that is subordinate and in need of (...)
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  3. Diana Reiss, Barbara Newman, Sarah Gruber, Paul Boyle, Katherine Lemcke, John Fraser, Jessica Sickler & Elizabeth Elliott (2006). Dolphins in Popular Literature and Media. Society and Animals 14 (4):321-349.
    This review of how dolphins are portrayed in popular media reveals four themes that may influence public acceptance of current scientific research into dolphin cognition. These themes are: dolphin as peer to humans, of equal intelligence or at least capable of communicating with or helping humans; the dolphin as the representation of a romantic notion of ideal freedom in nature, embodying principles of peace, harmony or love; the dolphin as a naïve, innocent being that is subordinate and in need of (...)
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  4. Jessica Sickler, John Fraser, Thomas Webler, Diana Reiss, Paul Boyle, Heidi Lyn, Katherine Lemcke & Sarah Gruber (2006). Social Narratives Surrounding Dolphins: Q Method Study. Society and Animals 14 (4):351.
    In preparation for development of an exhibit on the cognitive abilities of dolphins, the Wildlife Conservation Society sought to determine potential visitor's social perspectives about dolphin intelligence, and how these beliefs might influence acceptance of scientific information. The study reported here used Q methodology to identify these underlying social perspectives. The study of adults and the study of children each revealed three distinct perspectives. While consensus emerged among adults on points about dolphins' high intelligence and communication abilities, the three perspectives (...)
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  5. Diana Reiss, Brenda McCowan & Lori Marino (1997). Communicative and Other Cognitive Characteristics of Bottlenose Dolphins. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):140-145.
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  6. Diana Reiss, Brenda McCowan & Lori Marino (1997). Other Cognitive. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4).
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  7. Diana Reiss & Lori Marino (1995). Self-View Television as a Test of Self-Awareness: Only in the Eye of the Beholder. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):235-238.