Search results for 'Diane A. Harrison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Jonathan Harrison (2009). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus: Harrison How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Think 8 (21):7-12.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  2.  9
    Jonathan Harrison (1998). A Howler of Harrison'S. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):526.
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  3. Frederic Harrison (1872). On the Supposed Necessity of Certain Metaphysical Problems [a Paper by F. Harrison. No. 25 of a Ser.].
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  4. Diane A. Harrison & Hugh Busher (1995). Small Schools, Big Ideas: Primary Education in Rural Areas. British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (4):384-397.
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  5. Robert Pogue Harrison (2014). Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age. University of Chicago Press.
    How old are you? The more thought you bring to bear on the question, the harder it is to answer. For we age simultaneously in different ways: biologically, psychologically, socially. And we age within the larger framework of a culture, in the midst of a history that predates us and will outlast us. Looked at through that lens, many aspects of late modernity would suggest that we are older than ever, but Robert Pogue Harrison argues that we are also (...)
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  6. T. A. Joyce, Jane Ellen Harrison & Chr Blinkenberg (1912). Themis. A Study of the Social Origins of Greek ReligionThe Thunder-Weapon in Religion and Folklore. Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:397.
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  7.  13
    Yvonne Harrison & James A. Horne (2000). The Impact of Sleep Deprivation on Decision Making: A Review. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 6 (3):236.
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  8.  5
    A. R. W. Harrison (1963). G. Zeilhofer: Sparta, Delphoi und die Amphiktyonen im 5. Jahrhundert vor Christus. Pp. 80. Neustadt a. Aisch: privately printed. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (01):122-123.
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  9.  20
    A. R. W. Harrison (1954). The Athenian Constitution C. Hignett: A History of the Athenian Constitution to the End of the Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xi+420. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1952. Cloth, 35s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):142-145.
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  10.  10
    A. R. W. Harrison (1959). Athenian Democracy A. H. M. Jones: Athenian Democracy. Pp. 198. Oxford: Blackwell, 1957. Cloth, 21s. Net. The Classical Review 9 (01):60-62.
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  11.  4
    A. R. W. Harrison (1961). Greek History N. G. L. Hammond: A History of Greece to 322 B.C. Pp. Xxiv+689; 12 Plates, 34 Figs. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Cloth, 35s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (01):64-67.
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  12.  6
    A. R. W. Harrison (1937). The Father of History Max Pohlenz : Herodot, der Erste Geschichtschreiber des A Bendlandes. (Neue Wege Zur Antike, II. Reihe, Heft 7/8.) Pp. 222. Leipzig and Berlin: Teubner, 1937. Paper, (Export Price) Rm. 6.90. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (05):172-173.
  13.  11
    A. R. W. Harrison (1956). Representative Government in Greek and Roman History J. A. O. Larsen: Representative Government in Greek and Roman History. Pp. Vi+249. Berkeley: University of California Press (London: Cambridge University Press), 1955. Cloth, 30s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 6 (3-4):279-282.
  14. B. L. Long, G. Ungpakorn & G. A. Harrison (1993). Home–School Differences in Stress Hormone Levels in a Group of Oxford Primary Schoolchildren. Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (1):73-73.
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  15.  1
    J. B. Gibson, G. A. Harrison, R. W. Hiorns & H. M. Macbeth (1983). Social Mobility and Psychometric Variation in a Group of Oxfordshire Villages. Journal of Biosocial Science 15 (2):193.
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  16.  3
    G. A. Harrison, J. B. Gibson & R. W. Hiorns (1976). Assortative Marriage for Psychometric, Personality and Anthropometric Variation in a Group of Oxfordshire Villages. Journal of Biosocial Science 8 (2):145.
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  17.  3
    A. R. W. Harrison (1954). The Athens of Demosthenes A. H. M. Jones: The Athens of Demosthenes. Pp. 29. Cambridge: University Press, 1952. Paper, 2s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (01):41-42.
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  18.  5
    A. R. W. Harrison (1947). A Problem in the Rules of Intestate Succession at Athens. The Classical Review 61 (02):41-43.
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  19.  1
    A. R. W. Harrison & Antonio Maddalena (1953). Thucydidis Historiarum Liber Primus, Introduzione, Testo Critico e Commento con Traduzione e Indici a cura di Antonio Maddalena. Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:154.
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  20.  1
    A. R. W. Harrison & F. Sartori (1953). La crisi del 411 A. C. nell' Athenaion Politeia di Aristotele. Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:159.
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  21. M. A. Harrison (1971). Choudhury A. K. And Basu M. S.. On Detection of Group Invariance or Total Symmetry of a Boolean Function. Indian Journal of Physics, Vol. 36 , Pp. 31–42; Also Proceedings of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Vol. 45 , Pp. 31–42.Sheng C. L.. Detection of Totally Symmetric Boolean Functions. IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-14 , Pp. 924–926.Choudhury A. K. And Das S. R.. Comment on “Detection of Totally Symmetric Boolean Functions.” IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-15 , P. 813.Sheno C. L.. Author's Reply. IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-15 , P. 813. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (4):694-695.
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  22. A. W. Harrison (1938). Needless Schism: A Methodist Comment. Hibbert Journal 37:151.
     
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  23. D. J. Jeffries, G. A. Harrison, R. W. Hiorns & J. B. Gibson (1976). A Note on Marital Distances and Movement, and Age at Marriage, in a Group of Oxfordshire Villages. Journal of Biosocial Science 8 (2):155.
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  24.  3
    Peter Harrison (2002). Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:120-121.
    In recent years historians of science have come to an increasing appreciation of the role played by such moral and affective categories as “trust,” “wonder,” “pedantry,” and “self‐discipline” in the knowledge‐making enterprises of the early modern period. Barbara Benedict's book on curiosity is a most welcome contribution to the literature devoted to such topics. In a lively and entertaining work, Benedict sets out to “analyse literary representations of the way curious people, including scientists, authors, performers, and readers, were engaged in (...)
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  25.  43
    Glenn W. Harrison (2008). Neuroeconomics: A Critical Reconsideration. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):303-344.
    Understanding more about how the brain functions should help us understand economic behaviour. But some would have us believe that it has done this already, and that insights from neuroscience have already provided insights in economics that we would not otherwise have. Much of this is just academic marketing hype, and to get down to substantive issues we need to identify that fluff for what it is. After we clear away the distractions, what is left? The answer is that a (...)
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  26.  47
    Gerald K. Harrison (2016). A Moral Argument for Substance Dualism. Journal of the American Philosophical Association (1):21--35.
    This paper presents a moral argument in support of the view that the mind is a nonphysical object. It is intuitively obvious that we, the bearers of conscious experiences, have an inherent value that is not reducible to the value of our conscious experiences. It remains intuitively obvious that we have inherent value even when we represent ourselves to have no physical bodies whatsoever. Given certain assumptions about morality and moral intuitions, this implies that the bearers of conscious experiences—the objects (...)
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  27. Peter Harrison (2010). A Scientific Buddhism? Zygon 45 (4):861-869.
    This essay endorses the argument of Donald Lopez's Buddhism and Science and shows how the general thesis of the book is consonant with other historical work on the “discovery” of Buddhism and on the emergence of Western conceptions of religion. It asks whether one of the key claims of Buddhism and Science—that Buddhism pays a price for its flirtation with the modern sciences—might be applicable to science-and-religion discussions more generally.
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  28. Gerald K. Harrison (2013). The Moral Supervenience Thesis is Not a Conceptual Truth. Analysis 73 (1):62-68.
    Virtually everyone takes the moral supervenience thesis to be a basic conceptual truth about morality. As a result, if a metaethical theory has difficulties respecting or adequately explaining the supervenience relationship it is deemed to be in big trouble. However, the moral supervenience thesis is a not a conceptual truth (though it may be true) and as such it is not a problem if a metaethical theory cannot respect or explain it.
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  29.  10
    Gerald K. Harrison (2016). A God Exists. Think 15 (43):51-63.
    I argue that normative reasons are powerful evidence that a god exists. Normative reasons are presupposed by all intellectual inquiry, yet it appears there is only one thing they could credibly be: the favourings a god is having of us doing and believing things. I anticipate some possible objections and show them to be confused or dogmatic.
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  30.  21
    Jill Harrison (2008). Lessons Learned From Pesticide Drift: A Call to Bring Production Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Social Justice Back Into Agrifood Research and Activism. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):163-167.
    I use the case of pesticide drift to discuss the neoliberal shift in agrifood activism and its implications for public health and social justice. I argue that the benefits of this shift have been achieved at the cost of privileging certain bodies and spaces over others and absolving the state of its responsibility to ensure the conditions of social justice. I use this critical intervention as a means of introducing several opportunities for strengthening agrifood research and advocacy. First, I call (...)
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  31.  13
    Gerald K. Harrison (2015). Morality, Inescapable Rational Authority, and a God's Wishes. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):454-474.
    It is a supposed conceptual truth about moral norms that we have reason to comply with them even if we desire not to. This combination of rational authority and inescapability is thought to be incompatible with instrumentalism about practical reason. This essay argues that there are ways in which norms with inescapable rational authority can exist alongside instrumentalism about practical reason. One way involves positing an afterlife and a powerful supernatural agency—so, a kind of god—who has total control over our (...)
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  32.  31
    Victoria Harrison (2006). The Pragmatics of Defining Religion in a Multi-Cultural World. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 59 (3):133 - 152.
    Few seem to have difficulty in distinguishing between religious and secular institutions, yet there is widespread disagreement regarding what “religion” actually means. Indeed, some go so far as to question whether there is anything at all distinctive about religions. Hence, formulating a definition of “religion” that can command wide assent has proven to be an extremely difficult task. In this article, I consider the most prominent of the many rival definitions that have been proposed, the majority falling within three basic (...)
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  33.  10
    S. J. Harrison (2004). Apuleius: A Latin Sophist. OUP Oxford.
    This book provides the first general account of the works of the Latin writer Apuleius, most famous for his great novel the `Metamorphoses' or `Golden Ass'. Living in second-century North Africa, Apuleius was more than an author; he was an orator and professional intellectual, Platonist philosopher, extraordinary stylist, relentless self-promoter, as well as a versatile author of a remarkably diverse body of other work, much of which is lost to us.
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  34.  15
    J. Arthur, T. Harrison, K. Kristjánsson, I. Davidson, D. Hayes & J. Higgins, My Character: Enhancing Future Mindedness in Young People: A Feasibility Study.
    The aim of the My Character project was to develop a better understanding of how interventions designed to develop character might enhance moral formation and futuremindedness in young people. Futuremindedness can be defined as an individual’s capacity to set goals and make plans to achieve them. Establishing goals requires considerable moral reflection, and the achievement of worthwhile aims requires character traits such as courage and the capacity to delay gratification. The research team developed two new educational interventions – a website (...)
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  35.  26
    Victoria S. Harrison (1997). Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments: A Clarification. Religious Studies 33 (4):455-472.
    The article proposes that the hypothetical framework of Kierkegaard's "Philosophical Fragments" is determined by the question 'How is it possible for one to become a disciple?' An account of this framework is provided by employing an original interpretation of the concept 'the Moment'. This enables an understanding of 'the condition' by means of a contrast between 'Universalist' and 'Particularist' perspectives. Moreover, it is only when the insights offered by both perspectives are combined that the answer to the determining question of (...)
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  36.  60
    Gerald K. Harrison (2010). A Challenge for Soft Line Replies to Manipulation Cases. Philosophia 38 (3):555-568.
    Cases involving certain kinds of manipulation seem to challenge compatibilism about responsibility-grounding free will. To deal with such cases many compatibilists give what has become known as a ‘soft line’ reply. In this paper I present a challenge to the soft line reply. I argue that any relevant case involving manipulation—and to which a compatibilist might wish to give a soft line reply—can be transformed into one supporting a degree of moral responsibility through the addition of libertarian elements (such as (...)
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  37.  61
    Victoria S. Harrison, Theorizing Religious Diversity in a Multicultural World.
    This paper examines a variety of intellectual responses to the religious and philosophical issues raised by religious plurality. While the specific questions raised by religious plurality differ across traditions, the more general problem that faces all religious intellectuals is how to provide a compelling theoretical account of the relationship between the various religions of the world. The paper briefly reviews religious exclusivism and inclusivism, before focusing upon theories of religious pluralism. After clarifying the distinction between religious pluralism and relativism about (...)
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  38.  22
    Jeffrey S. Harrison (2002). A Stakeholder Perspective of Entrepreneurial Activity. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2002:143-150.
    Venkataraman (2000) described entrepreneurship as a method for resolving stakeholder value anomalies. His description provides strong normative support for encouraging entrepreneurship in society on the basis of reducing inequities and promoting social harmony. However, a stakeholder perspective of entrepreneurship also has the potential to provide a flexible and comprehensive description of the entrepreneurial process through its various stages. In addition, a stakeholder perspective, combined with resource-based theory, can help researchers in identifying factors that lead to entrepreneurial success or failure. Specifically, (...)
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  39.  27
    Peter Harrison (2009). Linnaeus as a Second Adam? Taxonomy and the Religious Vocation. Zygon 44 (4):879-893.
    Swedish naturalist Carl von Linné (1707–1778) became known during his lifetime as a "second Adam" because of his taxonomic endeavors. The significance of this epithet was that in Genesis Adam was reported to have named the beasts—an episode that was usually interpreted to mean that Adam possessed a scientific knowledge of nature and a perfect taxonomy. Linnaeus's soubriquet exemplifies the way in which the Genesis narratives of creation were used in the early modern period to give religious legitimacy to scientific (...)
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  40.  19
    Victoria Harrison (2005). Arguments From Design: A Self-Defeating Strategy? Philosophia 33 (1-4):297-317.
    In this article, after reviewing traditional arguments from design, I consider some more recent versions: the so-called ‘new design arguments’ for the existence of God. These arguments enjoy an apparent advantage over the traditional arguments from design by avoiding some of Hume’s famous criticisms. However, in seeking to render religion and science compatible, it seems that they require a modification not only of our scientific understanding but also of the traditional conception of God. Moreover, there is a key problem with (...)
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  41.  7
    Peter Harrison, A Theory of Legislation From a Systems Perspective.
    In this thesis I outline a view of primary legislation from a systems perspective. I suggest that systems theory and, in particular, autopoietic theory, as modified by field theory, is a mechanism for understanding how society operates. The description of primary legislation that I outline differs markedly from any conventional definition in that I argue that primary legislation is not, and indeed cannot be, either a law or any of the euphemisms that are usually accorded to an enactment by a (...)
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  42.  3
    E. Harrison (1913). A Problem In The Corinthian War. Classical Quarterly 7 (02):132-.
    In 394 Agesilaus, treading in the footsteps of Xerxes, came from Asia by way of Thrace and Macedon into Thessaly, threw off the attacks of the Thessalian cavalry, proceeded without further trouble into Boeotia, and met the enemy at Coronea, where a great battle was fought. The question ought to have been asked before now, why was he not held up at Thermopylae?
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  43.  6
    Jonathan Harrison (1996). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Philosophy 71 (277):439 - 444.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  44.  7
    Neil Harrison (2005). The Learning is in-Between: The Search for a Metalanguage in Indigenous Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):871–884.
    Following the first significant research into Indigenous methods of learning, it was argued that Indigenous students could learn western knowledge using Indigenous ways of learning. Subsequent research contradicted this finding to take the position that Indigenous students must learn western knowledge using western methods and so this set the scene for the development of a pedagogy where Indigenous students could learn how to learn. Theorists in Indigenous education began to search for a metalanguage. Crosscultural theorists have perceived this metalanguage in (...)
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  45.  1
    S. J. Harrison (1994). Ferox Scelerum? A Note on Tacitus, Annals 4.12.2. Classical Quarterly 44 (02):557-.
    Commentators on this passage have drawn attention to the unusual genitive in the phrase ferox scelerum, ‘fierce in his crimes’: ‘this adj. seems here alone to take an objective genitive’, says Furneaux, while Martin and Woodman state that ‘the dependent genitive of an external attribute, evidently on the analogy of its use with personal characteristics , seems unparalleled and is perhaps intended to suggest that Sejanus' criminality was innate’. Most commentators add a reference to Sallust's description of Jugurtha as sceleribus (...)
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  46.  1
    S. J. Harrison (1991). Discordia Taetra: The History of a Hexameter-Ending. Classical Quarterly 41 (01):138-.
    In Latin Hexameter Verse, his 1903 manual for composers of Latin hexameters which is still useful as a guide to Vergil's metrical and prosodic practices, S. E. Winbolt states that a hexameter ‘must not end with an adjective preceded by a noun with a similar short ending, e.g.…flumina nota’ unless the adjective is emphatic, ‘i.e. strongly distinctive, predicative or antithetical’. Whether or not his distinction between emphatic and non-emphatic adjectives in this position is wholly workable , Winbolt here rightly detects (...)
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  47.  1
    Geoffrey Harrison (1978). A Subjectivist Reply to Swinburne. Philosophy 53 (205):389 - 394.
    A philosophical tradition is in part identified by its more durable controversies. The British tradition in moral philosophy running, roughly, from Hobbes to the present day, involves several fine examples of the type—the plausibility or otherwise of the compatibilist view of free will, the case for and against utilitarianism, and perhaps above all the implications of the fact/value distinction. It is always pleasing to find some new variation on such themes; you have a comforting sense of the inherent permanence of (...)
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  48.  1
    Jonathan Harrison (1957). Can I Have a Duty to Believe in God? Philosophy 32 (122):241 - 252.
    After a preliminary discussion of the extent to which belief is voluntary, The author goes on to consider whether it can be our duty to induce belief. He considers the question whether we have a duty to believe that there is a God in relation to the more general question whether we have a duty to do what is right (what is objectively right), Or a duty to do merely what we think is right (what is subjectively right). He concludes (...)
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  49. J. F. C. Harrison (1955). A History of the Working Men's College, 1854-1954. British Journal of Educational Studies 3 (2):192-192.
    Originally published in 1954, this is the first full-length account of the history of the Working Men’s College in St.Pancras, London. One hundred and fifty years on from its foundation in 1854, it is the oldest adult educational institute in the country. Self-governing and self-financing, it is a rich part of London’s social history. The college stands out as a distinctive monument of the voluntary social service founded by the Victorians, unchanged in all its essentials yet adapting itself to the (...)
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  50. S. J. Harrison (1986). A Note on Euripides, Medea 12. Classical Quarterly 36 (01):260-.
    Euripides, Medea 11–13 :12 πολιτν codd. et Σbv; πολίταις V3, sicut coni. Barnes 13 ατ Sakorrphos; ατή codd. et gE et Stob. 4.23.30In his recent discussion of this passage , Diggle has convincingly argued for πολίταις and ατ, the latter of which he places in his new Oxford text, but recognises that υγ remains highly problematic : ‘The truth, I think, is still to seek’. It is to this last difficulty that I should like to suggest a solution.The problems of (...)
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