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  1. Andre L. Souza, Krista Byers-Heinlein & Diane Poulin-Dubois (2013). Bilingual and Monolingual Children Prefer Native-Accented Speakers. Frontiers in Psychology 4:953.
    Adults and young children prefer to affiliate with some individuals rather than others. Studies have shown that monolingual children show in-group biases for individuals who speak their native language without a foreign accent (Kinzler, Dupoux, & Spelke, 2007). Some studies have suggested that bilingual children are less influenced than monolinguals by language variety when attributing personality traits to different speakers (Anisfeld & Lambert, 1964), which could indicate that bilinguals have fewer in-group biases and perhaps greater social flexibility. However, no previous (...)
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  2. Diane Poulin-Dubois (2011). How to Build a Baby: A New Toolkit? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):144-145.
    Carey proposes a theory of conceptual development that specifies innate conceptual representations that get learning started. Those representations are the output of innate domain-specific input analyzers. I contend that innate core cognition about agency is itself a gradual construction and that the role of Quinian bootstrapping needs elaboration to account for the development of intuitive theories of psychology.
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  3. Diane Poulin-Dubois (2005). From Action to Interaction: Apes, Infants, and the Last Rubicon. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):711-712.
    Tomasello et al. have presented a position that is grounded in a conservative perspective of cultural learning, as well as in a rich interpretation of recent findings in early social cognition. Although I applaud their theoretical framework, I argue that data from studies of human infants are not necessarily consistent with the developmental picture that they describe.
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  4. Diane Poulin-Dubois (2001). Of Rabbits and Children. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):90-91.
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  5. Diane Poulin-Dubois & David H. Rakison (1999). A Developmental Theory of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):782-782.
    Early childhood is characterized by many cognitive developmentalists as a period of considerable change with respect to representational format. Dienes & Perner present a potentially viable theory for the stages involved in the increasingly explicit representation of knowledge. However, in our view they fail to map their multi-level system of explicitness onto cognitive developmental changes that occur in the first years of life. Specifically, we question the theory's heuristic value when applied to the development of early mind reading and categorization. (...)
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  6. Diane Poulin-Dubois (1998). Sailing in Neurath's Boat with Infants (and Avoiding Shipwreck). Mind and Language 13 (3):415–420.
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  7. Susan Graham & Diane Poulin-Dubois (1996). Speaking of Language: Thoughts on Associations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):636.
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