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Profile: Dianna Taylor (University of South Australia)
Profile: Dianna Taylor
  1. Dianna Taylor (2013). Et Tu, Subject? Telos 2013 (162):8-28.
    ExcerptIn interviews he gave during the 1970s and 80s, Michel Foucault acknowledged points of intersection between his work and that of the group of thinkers (the “Critical Theorists”) associated with the German Institute for Social Research, or Frankfurt School.1 While admittedly broad in nature, the shared concerns that Foucault identifies are nonetheless important; perhaps foremost among them is the extent to which the preoccupation with certainty that characterizes modern Western thought has led to the uncritical acceptance of what is merely (...)
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  2. Dianna Taylor (2013). Resisting the Subject: A Feminist-Foucauldian Approach to Countering Sexual Violence. Foucault Studies 16:88-103.
    This essay makes a case for the relevance of Foucault’s critique of modern Western subjectivity for feminist efforts toward countering sexual violence against women. In his last four Collège de France courses, Foucault shows that subjectivity produces a normalizing relation of the self to itself, the effects of which extend beyond the self in equally harmful ways. As I see it, this harm is especially damaging to women who have experienced sexual violence; moreover, it inhibits effective feminist resistance to such (...)
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  3. Dianna Taylor (2011). Countering Modernity: Foucault and Arendt on Race and Racism. Telos 2011 (154):119-140.
    ExcerptAnalysis of a possible intellectual affinity between philosopher Michel Foucault and political theorist Hannah Arendt is valuable in its own right, given the insight it offers into the work of these two important thinkers. At the same time, certain aspects of such an affinity are especially important because of what they illustrate about the unique ways in which harm manifests itself within the context of modern societies, and about how the terrain of modernity might be negotiated such that harm is (...)
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  4. Dianna Taylor (2010). Monstrous Women. Phaenex 5 (2):125-151.
    In this paper I argue that “monstrous” women – violators of both moral and gender norms – mark the limits of acceptable behavior through such violation and thus provide particular insight into the workings of gendered power relations within contemporary western societies. Drawing upon Michel Foucault’s 1975 College de France course titled Abnormal , I begin by arguing that gendered power relations in western societies can be characterized as “normalizing.” Next, I refer to Foucault’s discussion of “natural” and “moral” monsters (...)
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  5. Dianna Taylor (2010). Peg Birmingham: Hannah Arendt and Human Rights: The Predicament of Common Responsibility. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):591-595.
  6. Dianna Taylor (2009). Normativity and Normalization. Foucault Studies 7:45-63.
    This article illustrates ways in which the concepts of the norm and normativity are implicated in relations of power. Specifically, I argue that these concepts have come to function in a normalizing manner. I outline Michel Foucault’s thinking on the norm and normalization and then provide an overview of Jürgen Habermas’s thinking on the norm and normativity in order to show that Habermas’s conceptualizations of the norm and normativity are not, as he posits, necessary foundations for ethics and politics, but (...)
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  7. Dianna Taylor (2009). Review of Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies and The Body Problematic: Political Imagination in Kant and Foucault. [REVIEW] In David Papineau (ed.), Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Dianna Taylor (2003). Practicing Politics with Foucault and Kant: Toward a Critical Life. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (3):259-280.
  9. Dianna Taylor (2003). Rereading Foucault, Displacing Desire, Practicing Politics. Radical Philosophy Review 6 (1):81-83.
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  10. Dianna Taylor (2002). Hannah Arendt on Judgement: Thinking for Politics. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (2):151 – 169.
    Many of Hannah Arendt's readers argue that differences between her earlier and later work on judgment are significant enough to constitute an actual break or rupture. Of Arendt's completed works, the 'Postscriptum' to Thinking , the first volume of The Life of the Mind , and her Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy are widely considered to be her definitive remarks on judgment. These texts are privileged for two primary reasons. First, they were written after Arendt's controversial text, Eichmann in Jerusalem (...)
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