Search results for 'Diarmuid Hester' (try it on Scholar)

221 found
Order:
  1.  19
    Diarmuid Hester & Graham Harman (2011). Missives From the Fortress of Uncertainty. Mute.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    D. Micah Hester (2007). The Great Debates. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):456.
    This CQ department is dedicated to bringing noted bioethicists together in order to debate some of the most perplexing contemporary bioethics issues. You are encouraged to contact “The Great Debates” department editor, D. Micah Hester, UAMS/Humanities, 4301 W. Markham St., #646, Little Rock, AR 72205, with any suggestions for debate topics and interlocutors you would like to see published herein.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  9
    A. T. Campbell, S. F. Derrington, D. M. Hester & C. D. Lew (2011). Her Own Decision: Impairment and Authenticity in Adolescence. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):47-55.
    This case describes an adolescent in a crisis of a chronic medical condition whose situation is complicated by substance abuse and mental illness. D. Micah Hester provides an analytic approach, teasing apart the multiple layers of medical, developmental, and moral issues at hand and describing possible responses and outcomes. Amy T. Campbell examines existing legal guidelines for adolescent decision making, arguing that greater space exists for clinical discretion in these matters than commonly thought. Cheryl D. Lew discusses the development (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  16
    D. Micah Hester & Alissa Swota (2010). Human Rights and Genetic Technologies. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):126.
    This CQ department is dedicated to bringing noted bioethicsts together in order to debate some of the most perplexing contemporary bioethics issues. You are encouraged to contact department editor, D. Micah Hester, UAMS/Humanities, 4301 W. Markham St. #646, Little Rock, AR 72205, with any suggestions for debate topics and interlocutors you would like to see published herein.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  9
    D. Micah Hester (2009). Adolescent Decisionmaking, Part I: Introduction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (3):300.
    This CQ department is dedicated to bringing noted bioethicsts together in order to debate some of the most perplexing contemporary bioethics issues. You are encouraged to contact department editor, D. Micah Hester, UAMS/Humanities, 4301 W. Markham St. #646, Little Rock, AR 72205, with any suggestions for debate topics and interlocutors you would like to see published herein.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. D. Micah Hester (2012). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.
    Every one of us will die, and the processes we go through will be our own - unique to our own experiences and life stories. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death. D. Micah Hester takes seriously the complexities of experiences and argues that when making end-of-life decisions, healthcare providers ought to pay close attention to the narratives of patients and the communities they inhabit so (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. D. Micah Hester (2009). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.
    Every one of us will die, and the processes we go through will be our own - unique to our own experiences and life stories. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death. D. Micah Hester takes seriously the complexities of experiences and argues that when making end-of-life decisions, healthcare providers ought to pay close attention to the narratives of patients and the communities they inhabit so (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  8
    D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.) (2012). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction to healthcare ethics committees / D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld -- Brief introduction to ethics and ethical theory / D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld -- Ethics committees and the law / Stephen Latham -- Cultural and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.) (2007). John Dewey's Essays in Experimental Logic. Southern Illinois University Press.
    _Offering a new edition of Dewey’s 1916 collection of essays_ This critical edition of John Dewey’s 1916 collection of writings on logic, _Essays in Experimental Logic—_in which Dewey presents his concept of logic as the theory of inquiry and his unique and innovative development of the relationship of inquiry to experience—is the first scholarly reprint of the work in one volume since 1954. _Essays in Experimental Logic, _edited by D. Micah Hester and Robert B. Talisse, uses the authoritative texts (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised, the Medical Ethics (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Sally Hester & Stephen Hester (2012). Categorial Occasionality and Transformation: Analyzing Culture in Action. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (4):563-581.
    Our focus in this article is on some uses of categorial transformations. The discussion is divided into two main parts. In the first part, we begin by outlining our approach, namely membership categorization analysis (MCA), indicating the origins of the term and elaborating the conception of MCA as an ‘occasioned’ members’ apparatus. We then explain what we mean by the concept of categorial transformation, review some of the very few previous studies which have investigated this phenomenon and which are pertinent (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  49
    Leah Eisenberg, Thomas V. Cunningham & D. Micah Hester (2015). Closure But No Cigar. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):44-46.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  5
    D. Micah Hester & Alissa Swota (2014). Introduction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):73-75.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  15
    Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester (2016). Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical students that we have devised, the Medical Ethics (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Marcus B. Hester (1972). Are Paintings and Photographs Inherently Interpretative? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (2):235-247.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  23
    Rebecca J. Hester (2012). The Promise and Paradox of Cultural Competence. HEC Forum 24 (4):279-291.
    Cultural competence has become a ubiquitous and unquestioned aspect of professional formation in medicine. It has been linked to efforts to eliminate race-based health disparities and to train more compassionate and sensitive providers. In this article, I question whether the field of cultural competence lives up to its promise. I argue that it does not because it fails to grapple with the ways that race and racism work in U.S. society today. Unless we change our theoretical apparatus for dealing with (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  9
    D. Hester (2006). Why We Must Leave Our Organs to Others. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W23-W28.
    Organ procurement presents several ethical concerns (from what constitutes acceptable criteria for death to issues involved in specifically designating to whom an organ can be given), but none is more central than the concern for what are appropriate means for acquiring organs. The following discussion attempts a different perspective on the issue of organ procurement by arguing that, rather than appealing to our charitable consciences or our pocketbooks, relinquishing our organs after death in this day and age is, in fact, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18.  6
    J. David Hester (2004). Intersex(e) und alternative Heilungsstrategien. Ethik in der Medizin 16 (1):48-67.
    Die medizinischen Interventionen bei Intersexualität basieren auf den vorherrschenden gesellschaftlichen Geschlechtsnormen, die das intersexuelle Kind als behandlungsbedürftige Abweichung sehen. Aus diesem Blickwinkel wird unter „Heilung“ die erfolgreiche Integration des intersexuellen Individuums in ein eindeutig abgegrenztes Geschlecht verstanden, das durch eine medizinische Behandlung hergestellt wird. Dabei wird einerseits vorausgesetzt, dass unbehandelte intersexuelle Individuen nicht erfolgreich „heilen“ können, und andererseits, dass behandelte Individuen medizinische Interventionen als „Heilungsmaßnahmen“ erleben. Die Exploration der medizinischen Fachliteratur und der Berichte aus erster Hand sowohl von behandelten als (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19. Peter Eglin & Stephen Hester (1992). Category, Predicate and Task: The Pragmatics of Practical Action. Semiotica 88 (3/4):243-268.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  20.  2
    D. Micah Hester & Robert Talisse (2009). Physician Deception and Patient Autonomy. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):22-23.
  21.  8
    D. Micah Hester (2010). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.
    Crito revisited -- Blindness, narrative, and meaning : moral living -- Radical experience and tragic duty : moral dying -- Needing assistance to die well : PAS and beyond -- Experiencing lost voices : dying without capacity -- Dying young : what interests do children have? -- Caring for patients : cure, palliation, comfort, and aid in the process of dying.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  12
    D. Micah Hester (2003). Is Pragmatism Well-Suited to Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):545 – 561.
    This paper attempts to defend pragmatic approaches to bioethics against detractors, showing how particular critics have failed or succeeded. The paper divides bioethics from a pragmatic point of view into three groups. The first group is called "bioethical pragmatism" that will be represented by two book-chapters from the anthology, Pragmatic Bioethics . The second group is called "clinical pragmatism" championed by Fins, Baccetta, and Miller. Finally, a third group, which has roots in the legal tradition, has been called "freestanding pragmatism" (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  23.  12
    D. Micah Hester & Jerril Green (2011). It's All About the Brain. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):44-45.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 44-45, August 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Redmond G. O'Connell, Paul M. Dockree, Mark A. Bellgrove, Simon P. Kelly, Robert Hester, Hugh Garavan, Ian H. Robertson & John J. Foxe (2007). The Role of Cingulate Cortex in the Detection of Errors with and Without Awareness: A High-Density Electrical Mapping Study. European Journal of Neuroscience 25 (8):2571-2579.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  10
    Lee Hester, Dennis McPherson & Annie Booth (2000). Indigenous Worlds and Callicott's Land Ethic. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):273-290.
    We assess J. Baird Callicott’s attempt in Earth’s Insights to reconcile his land ethic with the “environmental ethics” of indigenous peoples. We critique the rejection of ethical pluralism that informs this attempted rapprochement. We also assess Callicott’s strategy of grounding his land ethic in a postmodern scientific world view by contrasting it with the roles of “respect” and narrative in indigenous “ethics.”.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26.  21
    D. Micah Hester (2004). What Must We Mean by “Community”? A Processive Account. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (5-6):423-437.
    The term community in ethics and bioethics traditionally has been used to designate either a specific kind of moral relationship available to rational agents or, in contrast, the context in which any sense of rational agency can even be understood. I argue that bioethics is better served when both selves and community are expressed through a more processive language that highlights the functional character of such concepts. In particular, I see the turn to processive community in bioethics as a turn (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  68
    William P. Alston & Marcus B. Hester (eds.) (1992). Faith, Reason, and Skepticism: Essays. Temple University Press.
    INTRODUCTION William Alston opens this dialogue on faith, reason, and skepticism by arguing that if the belief-forming processes of a typical Christian are ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28. Micah D. Hester, Dyrleif Bjarnadottir, Mark Bliton, Michael Boyland, Ken DeVille, Stuart Finder, Richard E. Grant, Chris Hackler, Lynn A. Jansen, Nancy Jecker, Kathy Kinlaw, Tracy Koogler, Eugene Kuc, Tim Murphy, David Ozar, Toby Schonfeld, Wayne Shelton & Alissa Swota (2007). Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    While tens of thousands of people across the United States serve on hospital and other healthcare ethics committees , almost no carefully prepared educational material exists for HEC members. Ethics by Committee is a one volume collection of chapters developed exclusively for this educational purpose. Experts in bioethics, clinical consultation, health law, and social psychology from across the country contribute chapters on ethics consultation, education, and policy development.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  41
    J. David Hester (2004). Intersex and Informed Consent: How Physicians' Rhetoric Constrains Choice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):21-49.
    When a child is born with ambiguousgenitalia it is declared a psychosocialemergency, and the policy first proposed byJohn Money andadapted by the American Academy of Pediatrics requires determination ofunderlying condition, selection of gender,surgical intervention, and a commitment by allparties to accept the ``real sex'' of thepatient, all no later than 18–24 months,preferably earlier. Ethicists have recentlyquestioned this protocol on several grounds:lack of medical necessity, violation ofinformed consent, uncertainty of standards ofsuccess, among others. This suggests that thefaults in the protocol can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  56
    Lee Hester & Jim Cheney (2001). Truth and Native American Epistemology. Social Epistemology 15 (4):319 – 334.
  31.  1
    Kellie R. Lang & D. Micah Hester (2016). Moral Hazards Over Narrative Methods in Pediatrics? Not Worth the Risk. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):42-44.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  1
    D. Micah Hester, Cheryl D. Lew & Alissa Swota (2016). When Rights Just Won't Do: Ethical Considerations When Making Decisions for Severely Disabled Newborns. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (3):322-327.
    Children like Baby G, born with complex chronic medical conditions that compromise function in the long term, are an increasing presence in tertiary-level neonatal intensive care units. The parents and health-care providers of these children are faced with profoundly difficult decisions. Whether severe congenital anomalies with poor prognosis are diagnosed antenatally or are discovered at the time of birth, the issues are vexing, and the impact decisions will have on everyone in the family is profound. What should such decisions be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  5
    Syed Tofail, Finbarr Murphy, Martin Mullins & Karena Hester (2015). Anticipatory Ethics and Governance : Towards a Future Care Orientation Around Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 9 (2):123-136.
    Nanotechnology presents significant challenges in terms of developing a regulatory framework. This is due to a lack of scientific knowledge about the behaviour of the technology in its interactions with biological and ecological processes, the environment and other technologies. Crucially, there is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the potential environmental and human health and safety impacts of NT. Consequently, the development of NT is a potential test case for framing new models of ‘soft law’ voluntary governance as a substitute (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  21
    Micah Hester (2000). The Essential Dewey? Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 28 (86):9-13.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (2009). Pardon My Asking: What's New? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):11-13.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  7
    D. Micah Hester, Toby Schonfeld & Jean Amoura (2007). Gatekeeping and Personal Values: Misuses of Professional Roles. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):27 – 28.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  5
    Jennifer Kleiner Fausett, Eleanor Gilmore-Szott & D. Micah Hester (2016). Networking Ethics: A Survey of Bioethics Networks Across the U.S. HEC Forum 28 (2):153-167.
    Ethics networks have emerged over the last few decades as a mechanism for individuals and institutions over various regions, cities and states to converge on healthcare-related ethical issues. However, little is known about the development and nature of such networks. In an effort to fill the gap in the knowledge about such networks, a survey was conducted that evaluated the organizational structure, missions and functions, as well as the outcomes/products of ethics networks across the country. Eighteen established bioethics networks were (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  7
    D. Micah Hester (1999). The Human Cloning Debate. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 27 (83):66-69.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  45
    D. Micah Hester (2007). Interests and Neonates: There is More to the Story Than We Explicitly Acknowledge. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):357-372.
    Although there are many different moral arguments concerning the use of Best Interests in neonatal decision-making, there seems in practice a firm commitment to application of the concept. And yet, there is still little reflection given by practitioners about what employing a Best Interest determination means in infant care. The following lays out a comprehensive taxonomy of interest-sources in order to provide for more robust considerations of what constitutes best interests of/for neonates.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  11
    John Dillon, Lloyd P. Gerson, Franklin I. Gamwell, Sohail H. Hashmi, Steven P. Lee, Ruth Illman, Paul D. Janz, John Lachs, D. Micah Hester & Nancy K. Levene (2005). Barrett, Justin L.(2004) Why Would Anyone Believe in God? Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc. $19.95, 160 Pp. Beckwith, Francis J., William Lane Craig and JP Moreland (2004) To Everyone an Answer: A Case for the Christian Worldview. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, $29.00, 396 Pp. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 57:217-218.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  31
    D. Micah Hester (1998). Progressive Dying: Meaningful Acts of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Humanities 19 (4):279-298.
    In this paper I use William James's understanding of significance in life to show that for certain patients euthanasia and assisted suicide can be importantly meaningful acts that family, friends, and health care professionals must acknowledge and even, at times, aid in bringing to fruition. Dying with meaning is transformative. It reshapes the lives of others that are left behind, giving to their lives new groundings by engaging them in the meaning of dying for us. For the patient, dying with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  9
    Peter Eglin & Stephen Hester (1999). “You're All a Bunch of Feminists:” Categorization and the Politics of Terror in the Montreal Massacre. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):253-272.
    Following Sacks's model membership categorization analysis (MCA) of a suicidal person's conclusion 'I have no one to turn to,' the paper examines in MCA terms a political actor's twin conclusions that murder-suicide is a rational course of action. The case in question is the killer's reasoning in the Montreal Massacre as revealed in his reported announcement at the scene (notably 'You're all a bunch of feminists. I hate feminists') and recovered suicide letter (for example, 'For why persevere to exist if (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  37
    Toby L. Schonfeld, Debra J. Romberger, D. Micah Hester & Sarah Elizabeth Shannon (2007). Resuscitating a Bad Patient. Hastings Center Report 37 (1):14-16.
  44.  4
    D. Micah Hester (2001). The Anatomy of Bioethical Consultations. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):57-58.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  19
    James M. Hester (1971). Private and Public Higher Education. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):406-414.
    Far from being in disarray, American private and public colleges and universities are stronger academically than ever before but the vast majority desperately need institutional financial support.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  21
    Micah Hester (1999). An Open Letter to SAAP Members. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 27 (83):46-47.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  24
    Marcus B. Hester (1966). Metaphor and Aspect Seeing. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (2):205-212.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  9
    D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (2012). Introduction to Healthcare Ethics Committees. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press 1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  8
    D. Micah Hester (2013). Mary Mahowald: Bioethicist. The Pluralist 8 (3):122-132.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  19
    Marcus Hester (1991). Aristotle on the Function of Man in Relation to Eudaimonia. History of Philosophy Quarterly 8 (1):3 - 14.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 221