Search results for 'Didactic poetry, Latin History and criticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  20
    Monica Gale (1994). Myth and Poetry in Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    The employment of mythological language and imagery by an Epicurean poet - an adherent of a system not only materialist, but overtly hostile to myth and poetry - is highly paradoxical. This apparent contradiction has often been ascribed to a conflict in the poet between reason and intellect, or to a desire to enliven his philosophical material with mythological digressions. This book attempts to provide a more positive assessment of Lucretius' aims and methodology by considering the poet's attitude to myth, (...)
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  2.  42
    John Douglas Minyard (1985). Lucretius and the Late Republic: An Essay in Roman Intellectual History. E.J. Brill.
    LUCRETIUS AND THE LATE REPUBLIC . Roman Intellectual History The history of human values is the history of changing notions about truth and reality, ...
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  3. David Alexander West (1969). The Imagery and Poetry of Lucretius. Edinburgh, Edinburgh U.P..
     
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  4.  18
    Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura ('On the Nature of Things') is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in 1417 it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. In this Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient (...)
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  5. D. N. Sedley (1998). Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is designed to appeal both to those interested in Roman poetry and to specialists in ancient philosophy. In it David Sedley explores Lucretius ' complex relationship with Greek culture, in particular with Empedocles, whose poetry was the model for his own, with Epicurus, the source of his philosophical inspiration, and with the Greek language itself. He includes a detailed reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature, and seeks to show how Lucretius worked with this as his sole philosophical (...)
     
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  6. Diskin Clay (1983). Lucretius and Epicurus. Cornell University Press.
  7. Keimpe Algra, M. H. Koenen & P. H. Schrijvers (eds.) (1997). Lucretius and His Intellectual Background: [Proceedings of the Colloquium, Amsterdam, 26-28 June 1996]. Koninklijke Nederlandse Adademie Van Wetenschappen.
     
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  8.  31
    Gordon Lindsay Campbell (2003). Lucretius on Creation and Evolution: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura, Book Five, Lines 772-1104. Oxford University Press.
    Lucretius' account of the origin of life, the origin of species, and human prehistory (first century BC) is the longest and most detailed account extant from the ancient world. It is a mechanistic theory that does away with the need for any divine design, and has been seen as a forerunner of Darwin's theory of evolution. This commentary seeks to locate Lucretius in both the ancient and modern contexts. The recent revival of creationism makes this study particularly relevant to contemporary (...)
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  9. Ledger William Allan Crawley (1963). The Failure of Lucretius. [Auckland, N.Z.]University of Auckland.
     
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  10. Donald Reynolds Dudley (1965). Lucretius. New York, Basic Books.
  11. David J. Furley & Olof Gigon (eds.) (1978). Lucrèce: Huit Exposés Suivis De Discussions. Dépositaire Pour La Suisse, Droz.
     
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  12. Schuyler Dean Hoslett (1939). Lucretius: His Genius and His Moral Philosophy. Kansas City, the Midland Publishers.
     
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  13. Karl Lachmann (1855). Caroli Lachmanni in T. Lucretii Cari De Rerum Natura Libros Commentarius Iterum Editus. Garland Pub..
     
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  14. Daniel Marković (2008). The Rhetoric of Explanation in Lucretius' de Rerum Natura. Brill.
     
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  15. Richard Minadeo (1969). The Lyre of Science. Detroit, Wayne State University Press.
     
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  16. James H. Nichols (1976). Epicurean Political Philosophy: The De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. Cornell University Press.
  17.  3
    Edward Ernest Sikes (1936). Lucretius, Poet & Philosopher. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.
    The Greek priests were concerned with ritual alone, and rarely, if ever, assumed the office of moralist; the philosophers, such as Parmenides and Empedocles ...
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  18. Giovanni Gullace (ed.) (1981). Benedetto Croce, Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to its Criticism and History. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Benedetto Croce’s influence pervades Anglo-Saxon culture, but, ironically, before Giovanni Gullace heeded the call of his colleagues and provided this urgently needed translation of _La Poesia, _speakers of English had no access to Croce’s major work and final rendering of his esthetic theory.__ __ _Aesthetic, _published in 1902 and translated in 1909, represents most of what the English-speaking world knows about Croce’s theory. It is, asserts Gullace, “no more than a first sketch of a thought that developed, clarified, and corrected (...)
     
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  19.  21
    David Armstrong (ed.) (2004). Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press.
    The Epicurean teacher and poet Philodemus of Gadara (c. 110-c. 40/35 BC) exercised significant literary and philosophical influence on Roman writers of the Augustan Age, most notably the poets Vergil and Horace. Yet a modern appreciation for Philodemus' place in Roman intellectual history has had to wait on the decipherment of the charred remains of Philodemus' library, which was buried in Herculaneum by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. As improved texts and translations of Philodemus' writings have become (...)
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  20.  11
    P. Hardie (1998). The Criticism of Didactic Poetry: Essays on Lucretius, Virgil, and Ovid. A Dalzell. The Classical Review 48 (2):297-298.
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  21.  3
    Elaine Fantham (2006). Gale (M.) (Ed.) Latin Epic and Didactic Poetry. Genre, Tradition and Individuality . Pp. Xxiv + 264. Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2004. Cased. ISBN 0-9543845-6-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):104-.
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  22. S. Harris (2005). Yasmin Annabel Haskell. Loyola's Bees. Ideology and Industry in Jesuit Latin Didactic Poetry. Early Science and Medicine 10 (3):442.
     
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  23.  17
    Clifford Andenberg (1983). Benedetto Croce: Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to Its Criticism and History. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Giovanni Gullace. Modern Schoolman 61 (1):56-57.
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  24.  8
    J. Wight Duff (1934). Secular Latin Poetry in the Middle Ages F. J. E. Raby: A History of Secular Latin Poetry in the Middle Ages. Vol. I, Pp. Xii + 408; Vol. II, Pp. Viii + 388. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1934. Cloth, 35s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (06):236-237.
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  25.  7
    Donald H. Smith (1991). Paul Whalen: Multas Per Gentes: A Collection of Latin Passages Selected From History, Prose and Poetry. (Themes in Latin Literature.) Pp. Xvi + 64; Several Illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1989. Paper, £3.50.Paul Whalen: Urbs Antiqua: A Collection of Latin Passages Selected From History, Poetry, Speeches, Inscriptions and Letters, with Vocabulary, Notes and Questions. (Themes in Latin Literature.) Pp. Xvi + 80; Several Illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1989. Pp. £3.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (02):524-.
  26.  5
    Stephen Gaselee (1941). Musae Anglicanae Leicester Bradner: Musae Anglicanae. A History of Anglo-Latin Poetry, 1500–1925. Pp. Xii+384. New York: Modern Language Association (London: Oxford University Press), 1940. Cloth, 21s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):98-100.
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  27.  4
    W. B. Anderson (1928). A History of Christian-Latin Poetry From the Beginnings to the Close of the Middle Ages. By F. J. E. Raby. Pp. Xii + 491. Oxford : At the Clarendon Press, 1927. 21s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (02):88-89.
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  28. Pieranna Garavaso, W. G. Regier, Benedetto Croce & Giovanni Gullace (1983). Poetry and Literature: An Introduction to Its Criticism and History. Substance 12 (4):95.
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  29. E. K. Rand (1935). A History of Secular Latin Poetry in the Middle AgesF. J. E. Raby. Speculum 10 (2):222-223.
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  30. Henry Jones (1896). Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher. [New York,Ams Press.
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  31. William Fenn DeMoss (1920). The Influence of Aristotle's Politics and Ethics on Spenser. New York,Ams Press.
     
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  32. George Santayana (1910). Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. New York,Cooper Square Publishers.
  33. F. Anne Payne (1968). King Alfred & Boethius: An Analysis of the Old English Version of the Consolation of Philosophy. University of Wisconsin Press.
     
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  34. Hermann Ferdinand Fränkel (1975). Early Greek Poetry and Philosophy: A History of Greek Epic, Lyric, and Prose to the Middle of the Fifth Century. B. Blackwell.
     
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  35. Dorota Heck (2010). Four Dilemmas: Theory, Criticism, History, Faith: Sketches on the Threshold of Literary Anthropology. Księgarnia Akademicka.
    Dilemma one, Between the theoretical concepts and authorial intention -- Dilemma two, Good manners and eristic -- Dilemma three, Between strangeness and familiarity -- Dilemma four, Between scholarly research and faith.
     
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  36.  1
    Amiel D. Vardi (1996). Diiudicatio Locorum: Gellius and the History of a Mode in Ancient Comparative Criticism. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):492-.
    Comparison of literary passages is a critical procedure much favoured by Gellius, and is the main theme in several chapters of his Noctes Atticae: ch. 2.23 is dedicated to a comparison of Menander's and Caecilius′ versions of the Plocium; 2.27 to a confrontation of passages from Demosthenes and Sallust; in 9.9 Vergilian verses are compared with their originals in Theocritus and Homer; parts of speeches by the elder Cato, C. Gracchus and Cicero are contrasted in 10.3; two of Vergil's verses (...)
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  37.  7
    Sharon L. James (2011). Freud's Rome: Psychoanalysis and Latin Poetry (Review). American Journal of Philology 132 (2):327-330.
    This Cambridge "little book" takes up residence in the influential aerie of psychoanalytic studies in Latin poetry, whose best-known members are the Lacanianists Paul Allen Miller and Micaela Janan. Oliensis' contribution is to introduce the father of psychoanalysis to the club. She rightly insists that "the 'Freud' of Freud's Rome is not just a synecdoche for psychoanalysis" , and she carefully distinguishes Freud from Lacan. She focuses on mourning, motherhood, and sexual difference, and she studies what she calls the (...)
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  38.  4
    Patricia Watson (1985). Axelson Revisited: The Selection of Vocabulary in Latin Poetry. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):430-.
    Although it is now fifteen years since G. Williams' thorough-going criticism of B. Axelson's Unpoetische Wörter, his discussion has failed to elicit the adverse response which might have been expected in view of the widespread influence exerted by the earlier work. The reason for this may be that Axelson's theory is so widely accepted that any refutation thereof may be disregarded. Yet surely Williams was right to point to the dangers of total reliance on statistics and to the necessity (...)
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  39. David Simpson (1988). Literary Criticism and the Return to "History". Critical Inquiry 14 (4):721-747.
    If any emergent historical criticism will tend by its own choice toward inclusiveness and eclecticism, it is also likely to be constrained by more subtle forms of complicity with the theoretical subculture within which it seeks its audience. It is not in principle impossible that we might choose to set going an initiative that is very different indeed from the methods and approaches already in place. But is nonetheless clear that we must be aware, in some propaedeutic way, of (...)
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  40. Simon Haines (2005). Poetry and Philosophy From Homer to Rousseau: Romantic Souls, Realist Lives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book features readings of over twenty key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines argues that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the "romantic" vs. the "realist".
     
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  41.  18
    Dee Reynolds (1995). Symbolist Aesthetics and Early Abstract Art: Sites of Imaginary Space. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents an innovative analysis of the role of imagination as a central concept in both literary and art criticism. Dee Reynolds brings this approach to bear on works by Rimbaud, Mallarme;, Kandinsky, and Mondrian. It allows her to redefine the relationship between Symbolism and abstract art, and to contribute new methodological perspectives to comparative studies of poetry and painting. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century was a crucial period in the emergence of new modes of representation, (...)
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  42.  5
    Patricia Fara & David Money (2004). Isaac Newton and Augustan Anglo-Latin Poetry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):549-571.
    Although many historians of science acknowledge the extent to which Greek and Roman ideals framed eighteenth-century thought, many classical references in the texts they study remain obscure. Poems played an important role not only in spreading ideas about natural philosophy, but also in changing people’s perceptions of its value; they contributed to Newton’s swelling reputation as an English hero. By writing about Latin poetry, we focus on the intersection of two literary genres that were significant for eighteenth-century natural philosophy, (...)
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  43.  10
    Jessica Rosenfeld (2010). Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love After Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: love after Aristotle; 1. Enjoyment: a medieval history; 2. Narcissus after Aristotle: love and ethics in Le Roman de la Rose; 3. Metamorphoses of pleasure in the fourteenth century Dit Amoureux; 4. Love's knowledge: fabliau, allegory, and fourteenth-century anti-intellectualism; 5. On human happiness: Dante, Chaucer, and the felicity of friendship; Coda: Chaucer's philosophical women.
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  44.  20
    M. J. F. M. Hoenen & Lodi Nauta (eds.) (1997). Boethius in the Middle Ages: Latin and Vernacular Traditions of the Consolatio Philosophiae. Brill.
    This volume brings together 14 papers, which deal with Albert's influence from the points of view of mysticism, philosophy, and the history of universities.
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  45.  4
    H. D. Jocelyn (1964). Ancient Scholarship and Virgil's Use of Republican Latin Poetry. I. Classical Quarterly 14 (02):280-.
    From the scholarly activity of the fourth and fifth centuries A.D. stem several collections of scholia to the poems of Virgil, most of which make copious reference to prose and verse composed in Latin before Virgil's time. The authors of these scholia were the last of a long line of commentators whose labours began soon after Virgil's death. Just as Virgil walked in the tracks of Theocritus, Hesiod, Aratus, Nicander, Homer, and Apollonius, so did his students in the tracks (...)
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  46. Gerald L. Bruns (2006). On the Anarchy of Poetry and Philosophy: A Guide for the Unruly. Fordham University Press.
    Marcel Duchamp once asked whether it is possible to make something that is not a work of art. This question returns over and over in modernist culture, where there are no longer any authoritative criteria for what can be identified (or excluded) as a work of art. As William Carlos Williams says, “A poem can be made of anything,” even newspaper clippings.At this point, art turns into philosophy, all art is now conceptual art, and the manifesto becomes the distinctive genre (...)
     
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  47. Phillip Harth (1981). The New Criticism and Eighteenth-Century Poetry. Critical Inquiry 7 (3):521-537.
    It is easy to overlook the fact that the kind of personalist criticism Brower, Wimsatt, and other New Critics were reacting against was a method of interpretation bequeathed by the nineteenth century which most of us would now regard as naïve, simplistic, and sometimes absurd. With the exception of a few poems such as Browning's dramatic monologues, which provided the speaker with an explicit identity as unmistakable as that of a character in a play—"I am poor brother Lippo, by (...)
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  48. Alice C. Hunsberger (ed.) (2012). Pearls of Persia: The Philosophical Poetry of Nāṣir-I Khusraw. In Association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies.
    Nasir-i Khusraw is a major literary figure in medieval Persian culture. He was a Muslim philosopher, poet, travel writer, and Ismaili da'i who lived a thousand years ago in the lands known today as Afghanistan, Iran, and Tajikistan. Although known in the West mainly for his Safarnama, or travelogue, which describes his seven-year journey from Khurasan, in the eastern Islamic lands, to Cairo, the city of the Fatimid imam-caliphs, his poetry and ideas are less familiar. Yet, over the centuries, Persian-speaking (...)
     
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  49.  11
    Diane Kelsey McColley (1997). Poetry and Music in Seventeenth-Century England. Cambridge University Press.
    This study explores the relationship between the poetic language of Donne, Herbert, Milton, and other British poets, and the choral music and part-songs of composers including Tallis, Byrd, Gibbons, Weelkes, and Tomkins. The seventeenth century was the time in English literary history when music was most consciously linked to words, and when the mingling of Renaissance and 'new' philosophy opened new discovery routes for the interpretation of art. McColley offers close readings of poems and the musical settings of analogous (...)
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  50. Tom Toremans (2010). Didactic Destiny: Sartor Resartus at the Intersection of Literature and Cultural Criticism. In Paul E. Kerry (ed.), Thomas Carlyle Resartus: Reappraising Carlyle's Contribution to the Philosophy of History, Political Theory, and Cultural Criticism. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press
     
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