16 found
Sort by:
  1. Shakir Ullah, Dima Jamali & Ian A. Harwood (2014). Socially Responsible Investment: Insights From Shari'a Departments in Islamic Financial Institutions. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):218-233.
    Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) are emerging as prominent players in the financial world and are increasingly known for their conservative socially responsible investment (SRI). Being the Shari'a regulators and monitors of IFIs, the Shari'a departments are expected to implement the Islamic perspective of SRI – drawn from Shari'a principles – in their respective institutions. The purpose of this paper is to develop an SRI framework applicable to IFIs and other Shari'a compliant entities and assess its applicability within Shari'a departments of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Charlotte M. Karam & Dima Jamali (2013). Gendering CSR in the Arab Middle East. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):31-68.
    This paper explores how corporations, through their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities, can help to effect positive developmental change. We use research on institutional change, deinstitutionalization, and institutional work to develop our central theoretical framework. This framework allows us to suggest more explicitly how CSR can potentially be mobilized as a purposive form of institutional work aimed at disrupting existing institutions in favor of positive change. We take the gender institution in the Arab Middle East as a case in point. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dima Jamali & Ben Neville (2011). Convergence Versus Divergence of CSR in Developing Countries: An Embedded Multi-Layered Institutional Lens. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):599-621.
    This paper capitalizes on an institutional perspective to analyze corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations in the Lebanese context. Specifically, the paper compiles a new theoretical framework drawing on a multi-level model of institutional flows by Scott (Institutions and organizations: ideas and interests, 2008 ) and the explicit/implicit CSR model by Matten and Moon (Acad Manag Rev 33(2):404–424, 2008 ). This new theoretical framework is then used to explore the CSR convergence versus divergence question in a developing country context. The findings (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Dima Jamali, Mary Yianni & Hanin Abdallah (2011). Strategic Partnerships, Social Capital and Innovation: Accounting for Social Alliance Innovation. Business Ethics 20 (4):375-391.
    This paper focuses on innovation in the context of business–non-governmental organization (NGO) partnerships for corporate social responsibility (CSR). While different aspects of business–NGO partnerships have been studied, the role of innovation and its potential implications for partnership outcomes have so far not been systematically explored. The paper defines innovation in simple and concrete terms and synthesizes from the literature what can be considered as critical ingredients to foster social alliance innovation. The paper posits in turn that these ingredients correspond closely (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Dima Jamali (2010). MNCs and International Accountability Standards Through an Institutional Lens: Evidence of Symbolic Conformity or Decoupling. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):617 - 640.
    The recent proliferation of International Accountability Standards (IAS) has attracted significant academic interest, but the extent of their adoption and integration by global firms remains underinvestigated.Capitalizing on institutional theory and the typology of strategic responses to institutional pressures proposed by Oliver (Acad Manage Rev 16(1): 145-179, 1991), this article uses an interpretive research methodology to analyze a sample of MNC practitioners' views regarding IAS, and derive some insights in relation to expected patterns of strategic responses to these new institutional pressures. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dima Jamali & Ramez Mirshak (2010). Business-Conflict Linkages: Revisiting Mncs, Csr, and Conflict. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):443 - 464.
    Heightened interest in business-conflict linkages has materialized with the advent of globalization and the rise of multinational corporations (MNCs). We examine business-conflict linkages in this article both theoretically and empirically. Theoretically, we examine three streams of the relevant academic literature: the academic business and society literature, the practitioner business and society literature, and the international business political behavior literature and argue that there is room and indeed need for their cross fertilization and integration in research on business-conflict linkages. We then (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Yusuf Munir Sidani & Dima Jamali (2010). The Egyptian Worker: Work Beliefs and Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):433 - 450.
    Earlier investigations have indicated that work beliefs in organization are impacted by different national cultures. In addition, those investigations have sought to understand the meaning of work in such different cultures. This study explores the meaning of work in the Egyptian context through an assessment of work beliefs and work attitudes. The article starts with a presentation of what is meant by the meaning of work and why research into work beliefs is both needed and worthwhile. The article then presents (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Dima Jamali & Tamar Keshishian (2009). Uneasy Alliances: Lessons Learned From Partnerships Between Businesses and Ngos in the Context of Csr. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):277 - 295.
    Interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has proliferated in academic and business circles alike. In the context of CSR, the spotlight has traditionally focused on the role of the private sector particularly in view of its wealth and global reach. Other actors have recently begun to assume more visible roles in the context of CSR, including Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) which have acquired increasing prominence on the socio-economic landscape. This article examines five partnerships between businesses and NGOs in a developing country (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Dima Jamali, Yusuf Sidani & Khalil El-Asmar (2009). A Three Country Comparative Analysis of Managerial Csr Perspectives: Insights From Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):173 - 192.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a concept that has acquired a new resonance in the global economy. With the advent of globalization, managers in different contexts have been exposed to the notion of CSR and are being pressured to adopt CSR initiatives. Yet, in view of vastly differing national cultures and institutional realities, mixed orientations to CSR continue to be salient in different contexts, oscillating between the classical perspective which considers CSR as a burden on competitiveness and the modern perspective (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dima Jamali, Mona Zanhour & Tamar Keshishian (2009). Peculiar Strengths and Relational Attributes of Smes in the Context of Csr. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):355 - 377.
    The spotlight in the CSR discourse has traditionally been focused on multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper builds on a burgeoning stream of literature that has accorded recent attention to the relevance and importance of integrating small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the CSR debate. The paper begins by an overview of the CSR literature and a synthesis of relevant evidence pertaining to the peculiarities and special relational attributes of SMEs in the context of CSR. Noting the thin theoretical grounding in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Dima Jamali (2008). A Stakeholder Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility: A Fresh Perspective Into Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):213 - 231.
    Stakeholder theory has gained currency in the business and society literature in recent years in light␣of its practicality from the perspective of managers and scholars. In accounting for the recent ascendancy of␣stakeholder theory, this article presents an overview of␣two traditional conceptualizations of corporate social␣responsibility (CSR) (Carroll: 1979, ‹A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance', The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505 and Wood: 1991, ‹Corporate Social Performance Revisited', The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717), highlighting their predominant inclination toward providing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Dima Jamali (2008). MNCs, CSR and Developing Countries. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:172-183.
    The accelerated growth in the number of multinational corporations (MNCs) and the global scope of their operations have drawn increasing attention to corporate social responsibility (CSR) considerations. MNCs are under increasing pressure and public scrutiny for socially responsible behavior across the spectrum of their operations. However, global patterns of CSR remain less understood, particularly in developing countries, as evidenced by the scant literature available on the topic. This exploratory study seeks to examine the CSR initiatives of a sample of MNCs (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Dima Jamali & Yusuf Sidani (2008). Classical Vs. Modern Managerial CSR Perspectives: Insights From Lebanese Context and Cross‐Cultural Implications. Business and Society Review 113 (3):329-346.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Dima Jamali (2007). The Case for Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility in Developing Countries. Business and Society Review 112 (1):1-27.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Dima Jamali & Ramez Mirshak (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Theory and Practice in a Developing Country Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):243 - 262.
    After providing an overview of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) research in different contexts, and noting the varied methodologies adopted, two robust CSR conceptualizations – one by Carroll (1979, ‘A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance’, The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505) and the other by Wood (1991, ‘Corporate Social Performance Revisited’, The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717) – have been adopted for this research and their integration explored. Using this newly synthesized framework, the research critically examines the CSR (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dima Jamali, Sarah Wazzi & Chirine Chehab (2007). The Need for a Systematic Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:168-173.
    In the context of the recent ascendancy of CSR, the spotlight has been primarily focused on the business sector, with sharp escalations in expectations of socialinvolvement and contributions throughout both the industrialized and developing world. These rising expectations can be reasonably understood and framed in the context of the expanded global reach and influence of the private sector, and acute market failures and governance gaps in developing countries for which the corporate sector is able to compensate. This paper argues however (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation