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  1. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2014). Whatever Works: Proportionality as a Constitutional Doctrine. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 34 (2):395-415.
    In The Global Model of Constitutional Rights Kai Möller claims that the proportionality test is underlain by an expansive moral right to autonomy. This putative right protects everything that advances one’s self-conception. It may of course be limited when balanced against other considerations such as the rights of others. But it always creates a duty on the state to justify the limitation. Möller further contends that the practice of proportionality can best be understood as protecting the right to autonomy. This (...)
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  2. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2012). Constitutional Review in Representative Democracy. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (2):297-324.
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  3. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2012). The Persistent Significance of Jurisdiction. Ratio Juris 25 (3):343-367.
    According to Joseph Raz's sources thesis, the existence and content of authoritative directives must be identifiable by resort to the social fact of their provenance from a de facto authority, without regard to any of the normative considerations that the authority in question is supposed to rely on in its judgment. This article argues that the sources thesis fails to account for the role of jurisdictional considerations (namely, considerations about the scope of a de facto authority's power) in the identification (...)
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  4. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2008). David Dyzenhaus, The Constitution of Law: Legality in a Time of Emergency. Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):95-98.
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  5. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2008). What is Good About Legal Conventionalism? Legal Theory 14 (2).
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  6. Dimitrios Kyritsis (2006). Representation and Waldron's Objection to Judicial Review. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (4):733-751.
    Jeremy Waldron objects to judicial review of legislation on the ground that it effectively accords the views of a few judges ‘superior voting weight’ to those of ordinary citizens. This objection overlooks that representative government does the same. This article explores the concept of political representation and argues that delegates may be institutionally bound to heed the convictions of their constituents, but they are not their proxies. Rather, they are best viewed as their trustees. They ought to decide according to (...)
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