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  1. Krista Bondy, Jeremy Moon & Dirk Matten (2012). An Institution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Multi-National Corporations (MNCs): Form and Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):281-299.
    This article investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an institution within UK multi-national corporations (MNCs). In the context of the literature on the institutionalization of CSR and on critical CSR, it presents two main findings. First, it contributes to the CSR mainstream literature by confirming that CSR has not only become institutionalized in society but that a form of this institution is also present within MNCs. Secondly, it contributes to the critical CSR literature by suggesting that unlike broader notions of (...)
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  2. Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (eds.) (2012). New Directions in Business Ethics. Sage Publications.
    v. 1. International perspectives on business ethics -- v. 2. New theoretical directions -- v. 3. Behavioral business ethics -- v. 4. Managing business ethics.
     
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  3. Wesley Cragg & Dirk Matten (2011). Ethics, Corporations, and Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):1-4.
    Corporate governance has resurfaced as a topic in the ongoing financial crises. This article frames the debate on corporate governance within the ongoing concerns about the corporate role in wider societal governance. It then maps out the context of the six scholarly contributions in this special issue by highlighting how the current debate moves towards a closer integration of governance at corporate and societal level.
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  4. Jonathan Doh, Bryan W. Husted, Dirk Matten & Michael Santoro (2010). Ahoy There! Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):481-502.
    The literatures of business ethics and international business have generally had little influence on each other. Nevertheless, the decline in the power of nation states, the emergence of non-governmental organizations, the proliferation of self-regulatory bodies, and the changing responsibilities, roles, and structure of multinational corporations make constructive engagement between these two disciplines imperative. This changing institutional landscape creates many areas of common concern. In this article, we describe the changing institutional context of global business and suggest ways in which both (...)
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  5. Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten (2009). Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs From Emerging Economies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):241 - 255.
    This article proposes a novel mapping of the complex relationship between business ethics and regulation, by suggesting five distinct ways in which business ethics and regulation may intersect. The framework is applied to a comparative case study of business responses to climate change regulation in Canada and Germany, both signatories to the Kyoto Protocol. Both countries represent distinctly different approaches which yield significant lessons for emerging economies. We also analyze the specific role of large multinational corporations in this process.
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  6. Dirk Matten (2009). Introduction to the Special Issue. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political actors. (...)
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  7. Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten (2009). The Changing Role of Business in Global Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
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  8. Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2008). Incorporating the Corporation in Citizenship: A Response to Néron and Norman. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):27-33.
    This article presents a response to Néron and Norman’s contention that the language of citizenship is helpful in thinking about the political dimensions of corporate responsibilities. We argue that Néron and Norman’s main conclusions are valid but offer an extension of their analysis to incorporate extant streams of literature dealing with the political role of the corporation. We also propose that the perspective on citizenship adopted by Néron and Norman is rather narrow, andtherefore provide some alternative ways in which corporations (...)
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  9. Dirk Matten (2008). Incorporating the Corporation in Citizenship. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):27-33.
    This article presents a response to Néron and Norman’s contention that the language of citizenship is helpful in thinking about the political dimensions of corporate responsibilities. We argue that Néron and Norman’s main conclusions are valid but offer an extension of their analysis to incorporate extant streams of literature dealing with the political role of the corporation. We also propose that the perspective on citizenship adopted by Néron and Norman is rather narrow, andtherefore provide some alternative ways in which corporations (...)
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  10. Dirk Matten, Andrew Crane & Jeremy Moon (2006). Cosmopolitan Citizenship and the Corporation. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:127-132.
    This paper, based on our forthcoming book (Crane, Matten, & Moon, 2007), examines the effects of globalization on reconfiguring notions of citizenship and the role of corporations in influencing, and being influenced by, this process. Based on an analysis of the literature on global citizenship, we explore the current and potential role for corporations in contributing to global governance systems and processes, both independent of, and in conjunction with, governmental and non-governmental organizations.
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  11. Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2005). Questioning the Domain of the Business Ethics Curriculum. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):357 - 369.
    This paper reassesses the domain of the business ethics curriculum and, drawing on recent shifts in the business environment, maps out some suggestions for extending the core ground of the discipline. It starts by assessing the key elements of the dominant English- language business ethics textbooks and identifying the domain as reflected by those publications as where the law ends and beyond the legal minimum. Based on this, the paper identifies potential gaps and new areas for the discipline by drawing (...)
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  12. Dirk Matten & Andrew Crane (2005). What is Stakeholder Democracy? Perspectives and Issues. Business Ethics 14 (1):6–13.
  13. Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):323-337.
    In the context of some criticism about social responsibility education in business schools, the paper reports findings from a survey of CSR education (teaching and research) in Europe. It analyses the extent of CSR education, the different ways in which it is defined and the levels at which it is taught. The paper provides an account of the efforts that are being made to mainstream CSR teaching and of the teaching methods deployed. It considers drivers of CSR courses, particularly the (...)
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  14. Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2005). Corporate Social Responsibility Education in Europe. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):323 - 337.
    In the context of some criticism about social responsibility education in business schools, the paper reports findings from a survey of CSR education (teaching and research) in Europe. It analyses the extent of CSR education, the different ways in which it is defined and the levels at which it is taught. The paper provides an account of the efforts that are being made to mainstream CSR teaching and of the teaching methods deployed. It considers drivers of CSR courses, particularly the (...)
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  15. Jeremy Moon, Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2005). Can Corporations Be Citizens? Corporate Citizenship as a Metaphor for Business Participation in Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):429-453.
    This paper investigates whether, in theoretical terms, corporations can be citizens. The argument is based on the observation that thedebate on “corporate citizenship” (CC) has only paid limited attention to the actual notion of citizenship. Where it has been discussed, authors have either largely left the concept of CC unquestioned, or applied rather unidimensional and decontextualized notions of citizenship to the corporate sphere. The paper opens with a critical discussion of a major contribution to the CC literature, the work of (...)
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  16. Krista Bondy, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2004). The Adoption of Voluntary Codes of Conduct in MNCs: A Three‐Country Comparative Study. Business and Society Review 109 (4):449-477.
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  17. Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2004). Stakeholders as Citizens? Rethinking Rights, Participation, and Democracy. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):107-122.
    This paper reviews and analyses the implications of citizenship thinking for building ethical institutional arrangements for business. The paper looks at various stakeholder groups whose relation with the company changes quite significantly when one starts to conceptualize it in terms of citizenship. Rather than being simply stakeholders, we could see those groups either as citizens, or as other constituencies participating in the administration of citizenship for others, or in societal governance more broadly. This raises crucial questions about accountability and democracy (...)
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  18. Dirk Matten, Andrew Crane & Wendy Chapple (2003). Behind the Mask: Revealing the True Face of Corporate Citizenship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):109 - 120.
    This paper traces the development of corporate citizenship as a way of framing business and society relations, and critically examines the content of contemporary understandings of the term. These conventional views of corporate citizenship are argued to contribute little or nothing to existing notions of corporate social responsibility and corporate philanthropy. The paper then proposes a new direction, which particularly exposes the element of "citizenship". Being a political concept, citizenship can only be reasonably understood from that theoretical angle. This suggests (...)
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