Search results for 'Disinterested love' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Kurt Love (2012). Love and Rage” in the Classroom: Planting the Seeds of Community Empowerment. Educational Studies 48 (1):52-75.score: 210.0
    Although no one unified anarchist theory exists, educational approaches can be taken to support the full liberation of the self and the construction of an interconnected community that strives to rid itself of eco-sociocultural oppressions. An anarchist pedagogical approach could be one that is rooted in a love/rage unit of analysis occurring along a spectrum of various types of actions and contributions within a community. Anarchism as a violent destruction of the state is a stereotypical view that has perhaps (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Perfect Love (2007). Chapter Five Process, Parturition, and Perfect Love: Diotima's Rather Non-Platonic Metaphysic of Eros Donald Wayne Viney. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 41.score: 210.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Championing Divine Love (2007). Chapter Seven Championing Divine Love and Solving the Problem of Evil200 Thomas Jay Oord. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.score: 210.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gregory Brown (2011). Disinterested Love: Understanding Leibniz's Reconciliation of Self- and Other-Regarding Motives. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):265-303.score: 180.0
    While he was in the employ of the Elector of Mainz, between 1668 and 1671, Leibniz produced a series of important studies in natural law. One of these, dated between 1670 and 1671, is especially noteworthy since it contains Leibniz's earliest sustained attempt to develop an account of justice. Central to this account is the notion of what Leibniz would later come to call `disinterested love', a notion that remained essentially unchanged in Leibniz's work from this period to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alan C. Love, Ingo Brigandt, Karola Stotz, Daniel Schweitzer & Alexander Rosenber (2008). More Worry and Less Love? Metascience 17 (2):327-327.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. G. Stevens (1953). The Disinterested Love of God According to St. Thomas and Some of His Modern Interpreters. The Thomist 16:307-333.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gary Foster (2009). Bestowal Without Appraisal: Problems in Frankfurt's Characterization of Love and Personal Identity. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):153 - 168.score: 66.0
    Harry Frankfurt characterizes love as “a disinterested concern for the existence of what is loved, and for what is good for it.” As such, he views romantic love as an inauthentic paradigm for love since such love desires reciprocation, sexual gratification and so on. I argue that Frankfurt’s conception of love is (a) too general—he does not distinguish between the type of love one has for one’s partner, one’s country, a moral ideal, etc., (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ian Rottenberg (2014). Fine Art as Preparation for Christian Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):243-262.score: 66.0
    This essay links Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of fine art to his description of Christian love. It does so by carefully showing how Marion's overall project is closely related to Kant's well-known account of the relationship between aesthetics and morality. While Kant and Marion both believe that aesthetic experience can lay the groundwork for moral action, their contrasting views of morality lead them to very different articulations of such a relationship. While Kant sees encounters with fine art as preparing individuals (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Y. Sandy Berkovski (2014). Gratitude, Self-Interest, and Love. Philosophia 42 (3):645-664.score: 66.0
    Gratitude is usually conceived as a uniquely appropriate response to goodwill. A grateful person is bound to reward an act of goodwill in some appropriately proportionate way. I argue that goodwill, when interpreted as love, should require no reward. Consequently, the idea of gratitude as a proportionate response to love is not intelligible. However, goodwill can also be understood merely as a disinterested concern. Such forms of goodwill are involved in reciprocal relationships. But gratitude has no place (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Benjamin Thompson & R. Lamb (2011). Disinterestedness and Virtue: 'Pure Love' in Feneloni, Rousseau and Godwin. History of Political Thought 32 (5):799-819.score: 60.0
    This paper examines the conception of disinterested love, pur amour, advocated by the Archbishop of Cambrai, Francois Fenelon, and its role in the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau andWilliam Godwin.We argue that for Fenelon, Rousseau, and Godwin, virtue is, or follows directly from, a form of love stripped of self-interest. Hence, virtuous activity is performed without either hope of reward or fear of punishment and sometimes with no reference to the self at all. At the same time, this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Disinterest Egoism (2007). Chapter One ThPxEE Views of Love: Egoism, Disinterest, and Harmonism Alan Vincelette. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 1.score: 56.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Markku Roinila (2013). Leibniz and the Amour Pur Controversy. Journal of Early Modern Studies 2 (2):35-55.score: 42.0
    The topic of disinterested love became fashionable in 1697 due to the famous amour pur dispute between Fénelon (1651-1715) and Bossuet (1627-1704). It soon attracted the attention of Electress Sophie of Hanover (1630-1714) and she asked for an opinion about the dispute from her trusted friend and correspondent, the Hanoverian councilor Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). This gave Leibniz an opportunity to present his views on the matter, which he had developed earlier in his career (for example, in Elementa (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Noriaki Iwasa (2011). Hume's Alleged Success Over Hutcheson. Synthesis Philosophica 26 (2):323-336.score: 36.0
    David Hume thinks that human affections are naturally partial, while Francis Hutcheson holds that humans originally have disinterested benevolence. Michael Gill argues that Hume's moral theory succeeds over Hutcheson's because the former severs the link between explaining and justifying morality. According to Gill, Hutcheson is wrong to assume that our original nature should be the basis of morality. Gill's understanding of Hutcheson's theory does not fully represent it, since for Hutcheson self-love and self-interest under certain conditions are permissible, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Richard Glauser (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Richard Glauser. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):25–54.score: 30.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be exercised in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anthony Savile (2002). Aesthetic Experience in Shaftesbury: Anthony Savile. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):55–74.score: 30.0
    [Richard Glauser] Shaftesbury's theory of aesthetic experience is based on his conception of a natural disposition to apprehend beauty, a real 'form' of things. I examine the implications of the disposition's naturalness. I argue that the disposition is not an extra faculty or a sixth sense, and attempt to situate Shaftesbury's position on this issue between those of Locke and Hutcheson. I argue that the natural disposition is to be perfected in many different ways in order to be exercised in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Christopher Grau (2013). Love, Loss, and Identity in Solaris. In Susan Wolf & Christopher Grau (eds.), Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    The sci-fi premise of the 2002 film Solaris allows director Steven Soderbergh to tell a compelling and distinctly philosophical love story. The “visitors” that appear to the characters in the film present us with a vivid thought experiment, and the film naturally prods us to dwell on the following possibility: If confronted with a duplicate (or near duplicate) of someone you love, what would your response be? What should your response be? The tension raised by such a far-fetched (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Aaron Smuts (forthcoming). Is It Better to Love Better Things? In Tony Milligan, Christian Maurer & Kamila Pacovská (eds.), Love and Its Objects.score: 27.0
    It seems better to love virtue than vice, pleasure than pain, good than evil. Perhaps it's also better to love virtuous people than vicious people. But at the same time, it's repugnant to suggest that a mother should love her smarter, more athletic, better looking son than his dim, clumsy, ordinary brother. My task is to help sort out the conflicting intuitions about what we should love. In particular, I want to address a problem for the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Christian Maurer (2014). On 'Love at First Sight'. In Christian Maurer, Tony Milligan & Kamila Pacovská (eds.), Love and Its Objects: What Can We Care For? Palgrave Macmillan. 160-174.score: 27.0
    This essay focuses on the early phases of romantic love and investigates the phenomenon that is often referred to as ‘Love at First Sight’, where typically very little information about the other is available, yet intensely felt causal processes are at work. It argues that the phenomenon called ‘Love at First Sight’ is not love in a proper sense, even if it may resemble love in certain aspects, and even if, under certain conditions, it may (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.score: 27.0
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Aaron Smuts, In Defense of the No-Reasons View of Love.score: 24.0
    Although we can try to explain why we love, we can never justify our love. Love is neither based on reasons, nor responsive to reasons, nor can it be assessed for normative reasons. Love can be odd, unfortunate, fortuitous, or even sadly lacking, but it can never be appropriate or inappropriate. We may have reasons to act on our love, but we cannot justify our loving feelings. Shakespeare's Bottom is right: "Reason and love keep (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Sara Protasi (2014). Loving People for Who They Are (Even When They Don't Love You Back). European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4).score: 24.0
    The debate on love's reasons ignores unrequited love, which—I argue—can be as genuine and as valuable as reciprocated love. I start by showing that the relationship view of love cannot account for either the reasons or the value of unrequited love. I then present the simple property view, an alternative to the relationship view that is beset with its own problems. In order to solve these problems, I present a more sophisticated version of the property (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Harry Frankfurt (2001). The Dear Self. Philosophers' Imprint 1 (1):1-14.score: 24.0
    Frankfurt argues that self-love is the purest and -- paradoxically, perhaps -- most disinterested form of love.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Irving Singer (2009). Philosophy of Love: A Partial Summing-Up. Mit Press.score: 24.0
    Is romantic love a recent idea? -- Plato -- Beyond idealism -- Concepts of transcendence and merging -- Courtly love and its successors -- Varieties of romantic love -- Identification of love and passion -- Bestowal and appraisal in relation to Freud -- Schopenhauer and Nietzsche -- Dualism and Freud on erotic degradation -- Democracy as related to romanticism -- Existentialism -- The love of life : a pluralist perspective -- Harmonization of Dewey and Santayana (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Robert Brown (1987). Analyzing Love. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Analyzing Love is concerned with four basic and neglected problems concerning love. The first is identifying its relevant features: distinguishing it from liking and benevolence and from sexual desire; describing the objects that can be loved and the judgments and aims required by love. The second question is how we recognize the presence of love and what grounds we may have for thinking it present in any particular case. The third is that of relating it to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Haridas Chaudhuri (1987). The Philosophy of Love. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 24.0
    The Problem of Love I would like to say a word about the psychological approach to love and to Erich Fromm's little classic, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Neil Delaney (1996). Romantic Love and Loving Commitment: Articulating a Modern Ideal. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (4):339 - 356.score: 24.0
    This essay presents an ideal for modern Western romantic love.The basic ideas are the following: people want to form a distinctive sort of plural subject with another, what Nozick has called a "We", they want to be loved for properties of certain kinds, and they want this love to establish and sustain a special sort of commitment to them over time.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Bennett W. Helm (2010). Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Bennett Helm re-examines our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Alan Soble (2000). The Coherence of Love. Philosophy and Theology 12 (2):293-315.score: 24.0
    I examine three common beliefs about love: constancy, exclusivity, and the claim that love is a response to the properties of the beloved. Following a discussion of their relative consistency, I argue that neither the constancy nor the exclusivity of love are saved by the contrary belief, that love is not (entirely) a response to the properties of the beloved.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John Wilson (1995). Love Between Equals: A Philosophical Study of Love and Sexual Relationships. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    Everyone loves something or somebody, and most people are concerned with loving another person like themselves, all equal. This book is based on the belief that getting clear about the concept and meaning of love between equals is essential for success in our practical lives. For how can we love properly unless we have a fairly clear idea of what love is? The book is written in ordinary language and for the ordinary person, without jargon or philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Christopher Grau (2010). Love and History. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):246-271.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I argue that a proper understanding of the historicity of love requires an appreciation of the irreplaceability of the beloved. I do this through a consideration of ideas that were first put forward by Robert Kraut in “Love De Re” (1986). I also evaluate Amelie Rorty's criticisms of Kraut's thesis in “The Historicity of Psychological Attitudes: Love is Not Love Which Alters Not When It Alteration Finds” (1986). I argue that Rorty fundamentally misunderstands (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Aaron Smuts, Love and Free Will.score: 24.0
    Many think that love would be a casualty of free will skepticism. I disagree. I argue that love would be largely unaffected if we came to deny free will, not simply because we cannot shake the attitude, but because love is not chosen, nor do we want it to be. Here, I am not alone; others have reached similar conclusions. But a few important distinctions have been overlooked. Even if hard incompatibilism is true, not all love (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Roman Briggs (2009). The Greening of Heart and Mind: A Love Story. Environmental Ethics 31 (2):155-168.score: 24.0
    Some environmentalists have argued that an effective ecological conscience may be rooted in a perspective that is either anthropocentric or sentiocentric. But, neither seems to have had any substantial effect on the ways in which our species treats nature. In looking to successfully awaken the ecological conscience, the focus should be on extending moral consideration to the land (wherein doing so includes all of the soils, waters, plants, animals, and the collectivity of which these things comprise) by means of coming (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Dominic Griffiths (2009). Daring to Disturb the Universe: Heidegger’s Authenticity and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Literator 30 (2):107-126.score: 24.0
    In Heidegger’s Being and Time certain concepts are discussed which are central to the ontological constitution of Dasein. This paper demonstrates the interesting manner in which some of these concepts can be used in a reading of T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. A comparative analysis is performed, explicating the relevant Heideggerian terms and then relating them to Eliot’s poem. In this way strong parallels are revealed between the two men’s respective thoughts and distinct modernist sensibilities. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. A. W. Price (1989). Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book explores for the first time an idea common to both Plato and Aristotle: although people are separate, their lives need not be; one person's life may overflow into another's, so that helping someone else is a way of serving oneself. Price considers how this idea unites the philosophers' treatments of love and friendship (which are otherwise very different), and demonstrates that this view of love and friendship, applied not only to personal relationships, but also to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Antony Aumann (2013). Self-Love and Neighbor-Love in Kierkegaard's Ethics. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2013 (1):197–216.score: 24.0
    Kierkegaard faces an apparent dilemma. On the one hand, he concurs with the biblical injunction: we are to love our neighbors as ourselves. He takes this to imply that self-love and neighbor-love should be roughly symmetrical, similar in kind as well as degree. On the other hand, he recommends relating to others and to ourselves in disparate ways. We should be lenient, charitable, and forgiving when interacting with neighbors; the opposite when dealing with ourselves. The goal of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michael Lacewing (2005). Real Love. The Philosophers' Magazine 29 (29):63-66.score: 24.0
    The idea that love is one of the most fundamental forces in the world, if not the most fundamental force, has a long and influential history. But does the idea of a fundamental connection between love and reality have a future? Can it hold any meaning for us if, for example, we do not believe in God? I want to offer some speculative thoughts that it can, thoughts that derive from a philosophical reflection on psychoanalysis. My central claim (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. C. Stephen Evans (2004). Kierkegaard's Ethic of Love: Divine Commands and Moral Obligations. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    C. Stephen Evans explains and defends Kierkegaard's account of moral obligations as rooted in God's commands, the fundamental command being `You shall love your neighbour as yourself'. The work will be of interest not only to those interested in Kierkegaard, but also to those interested in the relation between ethics and religion, especially questions about whether morality can or must have a religious foundation. As well as providing a comprehensive reading of Kierkegaard as an ethical thinker, Evans puts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sharon Krishek (2008). Two Forms of Love: The Problem of Preferential Love in Kierkegaard's Works of Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):595-617.score: 24.0
    The duty to love one's neighbor as oneself is at the core of Kierkegaard's Works of Love . In this book, Kierkegaard unfolds the meaning of neighborly love and claims that it is the only valid form of true love. He contrasts between neighborly love and preferential love (which includes romantic love and friendship) and criticizes the latter for being nothing but a form of selfishness. However, in some contexts, Kierkegaard seems to acknowledge (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1993). The Christian Theodicist's Appeal to Love. Religious Studies 29 (2):185 - 192.score: 24.0
    Many Christian theodicists believe that God's creating us with the capacity to love Him and each other justifies, in large part, God's permitting evil. For example, after reminding us that, according to Christian doctrine, the supreme good for human beings is to enter into a reciprocal love relationship with God, Vincent Brummer recently wrote: In creating human persons in order to love them, God necessarily assumes vulnerability in relation to them. In fact, in this relation, he becomes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Tullia D' Aragona (1997). Dialogue on the Infinity of Love. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Celebrated as a courtesan and poet, and as a woman of great intelligence and wit, Tullia d'Aragona (1510–56) entered the debate about the morality of love that engaged the best and most famous male intellects of sixteenth-century Italy. First published in Venice in 1547, but never before published in English, Dialogue on the Infinity of Love casts a woman rather than a man as the main disputant on the ethics of love. Sexually liberated and financially independent, Tullia (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Ulrika Carlsson (2010). Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium. Inquiry 53 (1):41-67.score: 24.0
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy (...)—what Kierkegaard terms “reflective sorrow”—so the elenctic method leads Socrates' interlocutors to aporia, not to knowledge. I offer a critique of Socratic irony, a stance reflected in the theory of love Socrates presents in the Symposium, and suggest that philosophy should instead be modeled on Alcibiades' and the Silhouettes' approach to love. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Julian Savulescu & Anders Sandberg (2008). Neuroenhancement of Love and Marriage: The Chemicals Between Us. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):31-44.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews the evolutionary history and biology of love and marriage. It examines the current and imminent possibilities of biological manipulation of lust, attraction and attachment, so called neuroenhancement of love. We examine the arguments for and against these biological interventions to influence love. We argue that biological interventions offer an important adjunct to psychosocial interventions, especially given the biological limitations inherent in human love.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. James Giles (1994). A Theory of Love and Sexual Desire. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (4):339–357.score: 24.0
    The experience of being in love involves a longing for union with the other, where an important part of this longing is sexual desire. But what is the relation between being in love and sexual desire? To answer this it must first be seen that the expression ‘in love’ normally refers to a personal relationship. This is because to be ‘in love’ is to want to be loved back. This much would be predicted by equity and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Petŭr Dŭnov (2004). Love is All Forgiving: Reflections on Love and Spirituality. Health Communications.score: 24.0
    A delightful book of spiritual maxims about a timeless topic-love: how to find it and how to keep it. Hegel called Peter Deunov "a world historical figure whose significance will only gradually be realized over the coming centuries.? In this beautiful gift book, Deunov shares his sacred words of wisdom on the many facets of love. Since time immemorial, human beings have experienced love as an exciting yet often elusive emotion that begs the question-How do you find (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Marguerite La Caze (2005). Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect. Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.score: 24.0
    Is love essential to ethical life, or merely a supplement? In Kant's view, respect and love, as duties, are in tension with each other because love involves drawing closer and respect involves drawing away. By contrast, Irigaray says that love and respect do not conflict because love as passion must also involve distancing and we have a responsibility to love. I argue that love, understood as passion and based on respect, is essential to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Irving Singer (1966). The Nature of Love. New York, Random House.score: 24.0
    Does anyone still believe in romantic love? The enormous number of romance novels consumed by American women would seem to indicate that the faith lives on . ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Christopher Cordner (2011). Two Conceptions of Love in Philosophical Thought. Sophia 50 (3):315-329.score: 24.0
    I distinguish, describe and explore two different conceptions of love that inform our lives. One conception found its classic philosophical articulation in Plato, the other its richest expressions in Christian thought. The latter has not had the same secure place in our philosophical traditon as the former. By trying to bring out what is distinctive in this second conception of love, centrally including its significance in revealing the fundamental value of human beings, I aim to show the importance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Troy A. Jollimore (2011). Love's Vision. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
    "Something in between : on the nature of love" -- Love's blindness (1) : love's closed heart -- Love's blindness (2) : love's friendly eye -- Beyond comparison -- Commitments, values, and frameworks -- Valuing persons -- Love and morality -- Afterword. Between the universal and the particular.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jan Bransen (2006). Selfless Self-Love. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (1):3 - 25.score: 24.0
    This paper challenges the idea that there is a natural opposition between self-interest and morality. It does by developing an account of self-love according to which we can have self-regarding reasons that (1) differ substantially from the standard conception of self-interest and that (2) share enough crucial features with moral reasons to count as morally respectable.The argument involves three steps. The first step concentrates on the idea of a moral point of view as a means to distinguish between (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Joseph Kisolo-Ssonko (2012). Love, Plural Subjects & Normative Constraint. Phenomenology and Mind (3).score: 24.0
    Andrea Westlund's account of love involves lovers becoming a Plural Subject mirroring Margaret Gilbert's Plural Subject Theory. However, while for Gilbert the creation of a plural will involves individuals jointly committing to pool their wills and the plural will directly normatively constraining those individuals, Westlund, in contrast, sees the creation of a plural will as a continual process thus rejecting the possibility of such direct normative constraint. This rejection appears to be required to explain the flexibility that allows for (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000