Search results for 'Dissociation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Chiara Degano (2007). Dissociation and Presupposition in Discourse: A Corpus Study. [REVIEW] Argumentation 21 (4):361-378.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at combining different theoretical and methodological approaches for the analysis of discourse, focusing in particular on argumentative structures. At a first level an attempt is made to include argumentation in critical discourse analysis in order to extend the analysis of interaction between “structures of discourse” and “structures of ideologies” (T. A. van Dijk, R. Wodak and M. Meyer (eds.), Methods of Critical Discourse Analysis. Sage, London, 1995) to higher levels of language description. At a second level the (...)
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  2. M. A. Van Rees (2006). Strategic Maneuvering with Dissociation. Argumentation 20 (4):473-487.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the possibilities for strategic maneuvering of the argumentative technique that Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca (The New Rhetoric. A Treatise on Argumentation, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame/London, 1969) called dissociation. After an exploration of the general possibilities that dissociation may have for enhancing critical reasonableness and rhetorical effectiveness, the use of dissociation in the successive stages of a critical discussion is examined. For each stage, first, the dialectical moves that dissociation can be employed (...)
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  3. Madan M. Bhalla & D. Proffitt (2000). Geographical Slant Perception: Dissociation and Coordination Between Explicit Awareness and Visually Guided Actions. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 24.0
  4. Shinya Fujii & Gottfried Schlaug (2013). The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): A Battery for Assessing Beat Perception and Production and Their Dissociation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:771.score: 24.0
    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: 1) music tapping test (MTT), 2) beat saliency test (BST), 3) beat interval test (BIT), and 4) beat finding and interval test (...)
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  5. Klaus Kessler Jason J. Braithwaite, Kelly James, Hayley Dewe, Nick Medford, Chie Takahashi (2013). Fractionating the Unitary Notion of Dissociation: Disembodied but Not Embodied Dissociative Experiences Are Associated with Exocentric Perspective-Taking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    It has been argued that hallucinations which appear to involve shifts in egocentric perspective (i.e., the out-of-body experience: OBE) reflect specific biases in exocentric perspective-taking processes. Via a newly devised perspective-taking task, we examined whether such biases in perspective-taking were present in relation to specific dissociative anomalous body experiences – namely the OBE. Participants also completed the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS, Sierra & Berrios, 2000) which provided measures of additional embodied anomalous-bodily experiences (unreality of self) and measures of derealization (unreality (...)
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  6. E. Ladavas, Anna Berti & A. Farne (2000). Dissociation Between Conscious and Non-Conscious Processing in Neglect. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins. 175-193.score: 24.0
  7. Axel Cleeremans (ed.) (2003). The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
  8. Thomas Schmidt & Dirk Vorberg (2006). Criteria for Unconscious Cognition: Three Types of Dissociation. Perception and Psychophysics 68 (3):489-504.score: 21.0
  9. Michael Snodgrass (2004). The Dissociation Paradigm and its Discontents: How Can Unconscious Perception or Memory Be Inferred? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):107-116.score: 21.0
  10. Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception and the Classic Dissociation Paradigm: A New Angle? Perception and Psychophysics 66 (5):882-887.score: 21.0
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  11. Joan Lesley (2006). Awareness is Relative: Dissociation as the Organisation of Meaning. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):593-604.score: 21.0
  12. Juha Silvanto, Nilli Lavie & Vincent Walsh (2005). Double Dissociation of V1 and V5/MT Activity in Visual Awareness. Cerebral Cortex 15 (11):1736-1741.score: 21.0
  13. Claire M. Karam (2003). Rethinking Dissociation As an Altered State of Consciousness: An Exploration of Altered State Encounters in Imaginal Space and Beyond. Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institutescore: 21.0
  14. Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken (2004). Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.score: 21.0
  15. Christopher Dana Lynn (2005). Adaptive and Maladaptive Dissociation: An Epidemiological and Anthropological Comparison and Proposition for an Expanded Dissociation Model. Anthropology of Consciousness 16 (2):16-49.score: 21.0
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  16. Rebecca Seligman (2005). Distress, Dissociation, and Embodied Experience: Reconsidering the Pathways to Mediumship and Mental Health. Ethos 33 (1):71-99.score: 21.0
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  17. Jody M. Davies (2001). Back to the Future in Psychoanalysis: Trauma, Dissociation, and the Nature of Unconscious Processes. In Muriel Dimen & Adrienne Harris (eds.), Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria. Other Press. 245-264.score: 21.0
     
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  18. L. E. Travis (1922). Studies in Dissociation. 1. Changes in the Auditory Threshold Induced by "Crystal Gazing.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (5):338.score: 21.0
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  19. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2003). Delusion, Dissociation and Identity. Philosophical Explorations 6 (1):31-49.score: 18.0
    The condition known as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is metaphysically strange. Can there really be several distinct persons operating in a single body? Our view is that DID sufferers are single persons with a severe mental disorder. In this paper we compare the phenomenology of dissociation between personality states in DID with certain delusional disorders. We argue both that the burden of proof must lie with those who defend the metaphysically extravagant Multiple Persons view (...)
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  20. Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.score: 18.0
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories against the criteria (...)
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  21. Louis Tinnin (1990). Mental Unity, Altered States of Consciousness, and Dissociation. Dissociation 3:154-59.score: 18.0
  22. John Morton (2004). Differentiating Dissociation and Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):670-671.score: 18.0
    Now that consciousness is thoroughly out of the way, we can focus more precisely on the kinds of things that can happen underneath. A contrast can be made between dissociation and repression. Dissociation is where a memory record or set of autobiographical memory records cannot be retrieved; repression is where there is retrieval of a record but, because of the current task specification, the contents of the record, though entering into current processing, are not allowed into consciousness. I (...)
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  23. Judy S. DeLoache (2004). Scale Errors by Very Young Children: A Dissociation Between Action Planning and Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):32-33.score: 18.0
    Very young children occasionally commit scale errors, which involve a dramatic dissociation between planning and control: A child's visual representation of the size of a miniature object is not used in planning an action on it, but is used in the control of the action. Glover's planning–control model offers a very useful framework for analyzing this newly documented phenomenon.
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  24. Ruth Herbert (2011). Everyday Music Listening: Absorption, Dissociation and Trancing. Ashgate Pub. Co..score: 18.0
    Music and listening, music and consciousness -- Conceptualizing consciousness -- The phenomenology of everyday music listening experiences -- Absorption, dissociation and trancing -- Musical and non-musical trancing in daily life -- Imaginative involvement -- Musical and non-musical trancing : similarities and differences -- Experiencing life and art : ethological and evolutionary perspectives on -- Transformations of consciousness -- Everyday music listening experiences reframed.
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  25. Robert G. Kunzendorf (2006). Universal Repression From Consciousness Versus Abnormal Dissociation From Self-Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):523-524.score: 18.0
    Freud attributed uncovered incest, initially, to real abuse dissociated from self-consciousness, and later, to wishes repressed from consciousness. Dissociation is preferred on theoretical and empirical grounds. Whereas dissociation emerges from double-aspect materialism, repression implicates Cartesian dualism. Several studies suggest that abnormal individuals dissociate trauma from self-conscious source-monitoring, thereby convincing themselves that the trauma is imaginary rather than real, and re-experience the trauma as an unbidden image.
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  26. Madeline J. Eacott & Alexander Easton (2007). Mental Time Travel in the Rat: Dissociation of Recall and Familiarity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):322-323.score: 18.0
    We examine and reject the claim that the past-directed aspect of mental time travel (episodic memory) is unique to humans. Recent work in our laboratory with rats has demonstrated behaviours that resemble judgements about past occasions. Similar to human episodic memory, we can also demonstrate a dissociation in the neural basis of recollection and familiarity in nonhumans.
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  27. Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.score: 18.0
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
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  28. Ronald C. Naso (2010). Hypocrisy Unmasked: Dissociation, Shame, and the Ethics of Inauthenticity. Jason Aronson.score: 18.0
    The paradox of hypocrisy -- The call of conscience -- Perversion and moral reckoning -- Compromises of integrity -- Beneath the mask -- Youthful indiscretions -- Dissociation as self-deception -- Multiplicity and moral ambiguity.
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  29. Rosemary Varley (2007). Plasticity in High-Order Cognition: Evidence of Dissociation in Aphasia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):171-172.score: 18.0
    High-order constructs such as intelligence result from the interaction of numerous processing systems, one of which is language. However, in determining the role of language in intelligence, attention must be paid to evidence from lesion studies and, in particular, evidence of dissociation of functions where high-order cognition can be demonstrated in face of profound aphasia.
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  30. Eyal Reingold (1996). Response Bias Correction in the Process Dissociation Procedure: Approaches, Assumptions, and Evaluation. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):232-254.score: 18.0
    Buchner, Erdfelder, and Vaterrodt-Plunnecke (1995) advocated an exposition of the process dissociation procedure within the framework of multinomial modeling. Among the misleading aspects of this exposition is its tendency to obscure the overlap between processes. In contrast, clarifying these crucial interactions leads to a general classification of response bias corrections to the process dissociation procedure. This scheme, in which corrective models are classified on the basis of process interactions, clarifies the assumptions underlying previously proposed corrections. As an illustration (...)
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  31. Andreas Kalckert & H. Henrik Ehrsson (2012). Moving a Rubber Hand That Feels Like Your Own: A Dissociation of Ownership and Agency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:40-40.score: 18.0
    During voluntary hand movement, we sense that we generate the movement and that the hand is a part of our body. These feelings of control over bodily actions, or the sense of agency, and the ownership of body parts are two fundamental aspects of the way we consciously experience our bodies. However, little is known about how these processes are functionally linked. Here, we introduce a version of the rubber hand illusion in which participants control the movements of the index (...)
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  32. Ayeesha K. Kamal & Nicholas D. Schiff (2002). Does the Form of Akinetic Mutism Linked to Mesodiencephalic Injuries Bridge the Double Dissociation of Parkinson's Disease and Catatonia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-587.score: 18.0
    Northoff provides a compelling argument supporting a kind of “double dissociation” of Parkinson's disease and catatonia. We discuss a related form of akinetic mutism linked to mesodiencephalic injuries and suggest an alternative to the proposed “horizontal” versus “vertical” modulation distinction. Rather than a “directional” difference in patterned neuronal activity, we propose that both disorders reflect hypersynchrony within typically interdependent but segregated networks facilitated by a common thalamic gating mechanism.
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  33. P. Jaskowski & R. Verleger (2000). Attentional Bias Toward Low-Intensity Stimuli: An Explanation for the Intensity Dissociation Between Reaction Time and Temporal Order Judgment? Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):435-456.score: 18.0
    If two stimuli need different times to be processed, this difference should in principle be reflected both by response times (RT) and by judgments of their temporal order (TOJ). However, several dissociations have been reported between RT and TOJ, e.g., RT is more affected than TOJ when stimulus intensity decreases. One account for these dissociations is to assume differences in the allocation of attention induced by the two tasks. To test this hypothesis, different distributions of attention were induced in the (...)
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  34. Eyal Reingold (1996). Response Bias Correction in the Process Dissociation Procedure: A Reevaluation? Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):595-603.score: 18.0
    A Buchner and E. Erdfelder (this volume) provide a commentary on our analysis of response bias correction in the process dissociation procedure. Unfortunately, this commentary fails to address the substantive issues that were raised in M. J. Wainwright and E. M. Reingold (1996). In the present article, we attempt to clarify some of their misrepresentations and the inconsistency inherent in their position. ©1996 Academic Press..
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  35. Jerome L. Singer (1990). Preface: A Fresh Look at Repression, Dissociation, and the Defenses as Mechanisms and as Personality Styles. In , Repression and Dissociation. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
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  36. Catherine Tallon-Baudry Valentin Wyart, Stanislas Dehaene (2012). Early Dissociation Between Neural Signatures of Endogenous Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness During Visual Masking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    The relationship between spatial attention and conscious access has often been pictured as a single causal link: spatial attention would provide conscious access to weak stimuli by increasing their effective contrast during early visual processing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed whether the early attentional amplification of visual responses, around 100 ms following stimulus onset, had a decisive impact on conscious detection. We recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals while participants focused their attention toward or away from masked stimuli which were physically (...)
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  37. Paul van Donkelaar & Paul R. Dassonville (2004). Further Evidence for, and Some Against, a Planning–Control Dissociation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):52-53.score: 18.0
    We summarize a number of recent results from our own experiments as well as those from other laboratories. Some of these results support Glover's planning/control dissociation and some are at odds with it. We suggest that the model needs to be further refined and expanded.
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  38. Moritz Daum, Manja Attig, Ronald Gunawan, Wolfgang Prinz & Gustaf Gredebäck (2012). Actions Seen Through Babies' Eyes: A Dissociation Between Looking Time and Predictive Gaze. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    In this study, we explored the relation of two different measures used to investigate infants’ expectations about goal-directed actions. In previous studies, expectations about action outcomes have been either measured after the action has been terminated, that is post-hoc (e.g. via looking time) or during the action is being performed, that is online (e.g. via predictive gaze). Here, we directly compared both types of measures. Experiment 1 demonstrated a dissociation between looking time and predictive gaze for 9-month-olds. Looking time (...)
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  39. John F. Kihlstrom & Irene P. Hoyt (1990). Repression, Dissociation, and Hypnosis. In Jerome L. Singer (ed.), Repression and Dissociation. University of Chicago Press. 181--208.score: 18.0
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  40. Arnaud Destrebecqz, Philippe Peigneux, Steven Laureys, Christian Degueldre, Guy Del Fiore, Joel Aerts, Andre Luxen, Martia Van Der Linden, Axel Cleeremans & Pierre Maquet (2005). The Neural Correlates of Implicit and Explicit Sequence Learning: Interacting Networks Revealed by the Process Dissociation Procedure. Learning and Memory 12 (5):480-490.score: 16.0
    In cognitive neuroscience, dissociating the brain networks that ing—has thus become one of the best empirical situations subtend conscious and nonconscious memories constitutes a through which to study the mechanisms of implicit learning, very complex issue, both conceptually and methodologically.
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  41. Stephen Braude, The Creativity of Dissociation.score: 16.0
    This paper examines the complex and creative strategies employed in keeping beliefs, memories, and various other mental and bodily states effectively dissociated from normal waking consciousness. First, it examines cases of hypnotic anesthesia and hypnotically induced hallucination, which illustrate: (1) our capacity for generating novel mental contents, (2) our capacity for choosing a plan of action from a wider set of options, and (3) our capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental influences threatening to undermine a dissociative state. These observations (...)
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  42. Yves Rossetti (ed.) (2000). Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.score: 16.0
  43. Philip Robbins (2009). Guilt by Dissociation: Why Mindreading May Not Be Prior to Metacognition After All. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):159-160.score: 16.0
    Carruthers argues that there is no developmental or clinical evidence that metacognition is dissociable from mindreading, and hence there is no reason to think that metacognition is prior to mindreading. A closer look at the evidence, however, reveals that these conclusions are premature at best.
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  44. Juha Silvanto Silvia Bona, Zaira Cattaneo, Tomaso Vecchi, David Soto (2013). Metacognition of Visual Short-Term Memory: Dissociation Between Objective and Subjective Components of VSTM. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 16.0
    The relationship between the objective accuracy of visual-short term memory (VSTM) representations and their subjective conscious experience is unknown. We investigated this issue by assessing how the objective and subjective components of VSTM in a delayed cue-target orientation discrimination task are affected by intervening distracters. On each trial, participants were shown a memory cue (a grating), the orientation of which they were asked to hold in memory. On approximately half of the trials, a distractor grating appeared during the maintenance interval; (...)
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  45. Brian A. Nosek, Attitudinal Dissociation: What Does It Mean?score: 16.0
    Many recent experiments have used parallel Implicit Association Test (IAT) and selfreport measures of attitudes. These measures are sometimes strongly correlated. However, many of these studies find apparent dissociations in the form of (a) weak correlations between the two types of measures, (b) separation of their means on scales that should coincide if they assess the same construct, or (c) differing correlations with other variables. Interpretations of these empirical patterns are of three types: single-representation — the two types of measures (...)
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  46. Arnaud Destrebecqz & Axel Cleeremans (2001). Can Sequence Learning Be Implicit? New Evidence with the Process Dissociation Procedure. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 8 (2):343-350.score: 15.0
    Running head: Implicit sequence learning ABSTRACT Can we learn without awareness? Although this issue has been extensively explored through studies of implicit learning, there is currently no agreement about the extent to which knowledge can be acquired and projected onto performance in an unconscious way. The controversy, like that surrounding implicit memory, seems to be at least in part attributable to unquestioned acceptance of the unrealistic assumption that tasks are process-pure, that is, that a given task exclusively involves either implicit (...)
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  47. Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, J. I. N. Kang-Xing & John Mikhail (2007). A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications. Mind and Language 22 (1):1–21.score: 15.0
    To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals' responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: (1) patterns of moral (...)
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  48. David Simpson (2008). Irony, Dissociation and the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (6):119-135.score: 15.0
    Within the philosophy of language, irony is not a terribly popular topic. For the most part its status is that of a peripheral and derivative oddity, and when it has been discussed, it has tended to be as an aside to a discussion of its more popular purported cousin, metaphor. My major goal here is to help drag irony towards the centre of attention, in two ways. First, in the course of sorting through the account of verbal irony I want (...)
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  49. Petr Bob & George A. Mashour (2011). Schizophrenia, Dissociation, and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1042-1049.score: 15.0
  50. Ernest R. Hilgard (1992). Divided Consciousness and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (1):16-31.score: 15.0
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