Search results for 'Divided Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Anat Ninio & Daniel Kahneman (1974). Reaction Time in Focused and in Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):394.
  2.  19
    Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard (2003). Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting. Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.
  3. William A. Johnston, Seth N. Greenberg, Ronald P. Fisher & David W. Martin (1970). Divided Attention: A Vehicle for Monitoring Memory Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):164.
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  4.  10
    Mathilde Sacher, Laurence Taconnat, Céline Souchay & Michel Isingrini (2009). Divided Attention at Encoding: Effect on Feeling-of-Knowing. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):754-761.
    This research investigated the effect of divided attention at encoding on feeling-of-knowing . Participants had to learn a 60 word-pair list under two experimental conditions, one with full attention and one with divided attention . After that, they were administered episodic FOK tasks with a cued-recall phase, a FOK phase and a recognition phase. Our results showed that DA at encoding altered not only memory performance, but also FOK judgments and FOK accuracy. These findings throw (...)
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  5.  2
    Harvey G. Shulman, Seth N. Greenberg & JonPaul Martin (1971). Intertask Delay as a Parameter of Perceptual Deficit in Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (3):439-440.
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  6. Nelson Cowan (2012). Focused and Divided Attention to the Eyes and Ears : A Research Journey. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press 32.
  7.  1
    Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Jill D. Waring & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2014). The Effect of Divided Attention on Emotion-Induced Memory Narrowing. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):881-892.
  8.  43
    Elizabeth Spelke (1976). Skills of Divided Attention. Cognition 4 (3):215-230.
  9.  8
    Fergus I. M. Craik, Richard Govoni, Moshe Naveh-Benjamin & Nicole D. Anderson (1996). The Effects of Divided Attention on Encoding and Retrieval Processes in Human Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (2):159.
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  10.  2
    Maha Adamo, Carson Pun, Jay Pratt & Susanne Ferber (2008). Your Divided Attention, Please! The Maintenance of Multiple Attentional Control Sets Over Distinct Regions in Space. Cognition 107 (1):295-303.
  11. Romina Palermo & Gillian Rhodes (2002). The Influence of Divided Attention on Holistic Face Perception. Cognition 82 (3):225-257.
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  12.  7
    Yuh-Shiow Lee & Huang-Mou Lee (2011). Divided Attention Facilitates Intentional Forgetting: Evidence From Item-Method Directed Forgetting. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):618-626.
    This study examined the effects of post-cue interval and cognitive load on item-method directed forgetting. The results of Experiment 1 and Experiment 2 showed that forget item retention increased as the post-cue interval increased. Moreover, increasing the cognitive load of participants by asking them to perform a secondary counting task did not impair, but rather facilitated, the intentional forgetting of the studied item under long post-cue interval conditions. These results and analyses of recall gains from the additional use of the (...)
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  13.  3
    Ami Eidels, James T. Townsend & Daniel Algom (2010). Comparing Perception of Stroop Stimuli in Focused Versus Divided Attention Paradigms: Evidence for Dramatic Processing Differences. Cognition 114 (2):129-150.
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  14.  10
    Laurence Casini, Boris Burle & Noël Nguyen (2009). Speech Perception Engages a General Timer: Evidence From a Divided Attention Word Identification Task. Cognition 112 (2):318-322.
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  15.  6
    Lars BÄckman & Lars-GÖran Nilsson (1991). Effects of Divided Attention on Free and Cued Recall of Verbal Events and Action Events. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):51-54.
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  16.  2
    Jerwen Jou & Richard Jackson Harris (1992). The Effect of Divided Attention on Speech Production. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (4):301-304.
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  17.  25
    Robert Dunn (1995). Motivated Irrationality and Divided Attention. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):325 – 336.
  18.  1
    Daniel Fitousi (2016). Comparing the Role of Selective and Divided Attention in the Composite Face Effect: Insights From Attention Operating Characteristic Plots and Cross-Contingency Correlations. Cognition 148:34-46.
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  19.  9
    Matthew A. Palmer, Neil Brewer, Nathan Weber & Ambika Nagesh (2013). The Confidence-Accuracy Relationship for Eyewitness Identification Decisions: Effects of Exposure Duration, Retention Interval, and Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (1):55.
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  20.  17
    Eyal M. Reingold & Jiye Shen (2001). Investigating the Visual Span in Comparative Search: The Effects of Task Difficulty and Divided Attention. Cognition 81 (2):57-67.
  21.  1
    Ronald Okada & David Burrows (1974). Divided Attention and High-Speed Memory Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):191.
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  22. Fergus I. M. Craik (2006). Remembering Items and Their Contexts: Effects of Aging and Divided Attention. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. OUP Oxford
     
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  23. Er Hafter & Am Bonnel (1992). Divided Attention to Visual and Auditory-Stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):485-485.
     
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  24. William Hirst (1984). Practice and Divided Attention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):72.
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  25. M. Naveh-Benjamin (2006). Binding of Memories: Adult-Age Differences and the Effects of Divided Attention in Young Adults on Episodic Memory. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. OUP Oxford 627--656.
     
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  26. W. Hirst (1986). Aspects of Divided and Selective Attention. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen 105--141.
  27.  66
    Vasudevi Reddy (2003). On Being the Object of Attention: Implications for Self-Other Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):397-402.
  28.  54
    Geoffrey F. Woodman & Steven J. Luck (2003). Dissociations Among Attention, Perception, and Awareness During Object-Substitution Masking. Psychological Science 14 (6):605-611.
  29.  51
    Christopher Mole (2010). Attention is Cognitive Unison: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Highlights of a difficult history -- The preliminary identification of our topic -- Approaches -- Bradley's protest -- James's disjunctive theory -- The source of Bradley's dissatisfaction -- Behaviourism and after -- Heirs of Bradley in the twentieth century -- The underlying metaphysical issue -- Explanatory tactics -- The basic distinction -- Metaphysical categories and taxonomies -- Adverbialism, multiple realizability, and natural kinds -- Adverbialism and levels of explanation -- Taxonomies and supervenience relations -- Rejecting the process : first view (...)
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  30.  74
    Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press 1.
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to (...)
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  31.  17
    Anne Giersch & Serge Caparos (2005). Focused Attention is Not Enough to Activate Discontinuities in Lines, but Scrutiny Is. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):613-632.
    We distinguish between the roles played by spatial attention and conscious intention in terms of their impact on the processing of segmentation signals, like discontinuities in lines, associated with the act of scrutinizing. We showed previously that the processing of discontinuities in lines can be activated. This is evidenced by an impairment in the detection of a gap between parallel elements when it follows a gap between collinear elements in the same location and orientation. This effect is no longer (...)
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  32. Bernard J. Baars (1997). Some Essential Differences Between Consciousness and Attention, Perception, and Working Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):363-371.
    When “divided attention” methods were discovered in the 1950s their implications for conscious experience were not widely appreciated. Yet when people process competing streams of sensory input they show both selective processesandclear contrasts between conscious and unconscious events. This paper suggests that the term “attention” may be best applied to theselection and maintenanceof conscious contents and distinguished from consciousness itself. This is consistent with common usage. The operational criteria for selective attention, defined in this way, are (...)
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  33. Katalin Varga, Zoltán Németh & Anna Szekely (2011). Lack of Correlation Between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Various Components of Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1872-1881.
    The purpose of our study was to measure the relationship between performance on various attentional tasks and hypnotic susceptibility. Healthy volunteers participated in a study, where they had to perform several tasks measuring various attention components in a waking state: sustained attention, selective or focused attention, divided attention and executive attention in task switching. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured in a separate setting by the Waterloo-Stanford Groups Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C .We found no (...)
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  34. David Shinar & Mari R. Jones (1973). Effects of Set-Inducing Instructions on Recall From Dichotic Inputs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (2):239.
  35. Flavia Padovani (2011). Relativizing the Relativized a Priori: Reichenbach's Axioms of Coordination Divided. Synthese 181 (1):41 - 62.
    In recent years, Reichenbach's 1920 conception of the principles of coordination has attracted increased attention after Michael Friedman's attempt to revive Reichenbach's idea of a "relativized a priori". This paper follows the origin and development of this idea in the framework of Reichenbach's distinction between the axioms of coordination and the axioms of connection. It suggests a further differentiation among the coordinating axioms and accordingly proposes a different account of Reichenbach's "relativized a priori".
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  36. Julie Walsh (2015). Malebranche, Freedom, and the Divided Mind. In P. Easton & K. Smith (eds.), Gods and Giants in Early Modern Philosophy. Brill 194-216.
    In this paper I argue that according to Malebranche mental attention is the corrective to epistemic error and moral lapse and constitutes the essence of human freedom. Moreover, I show how this conception of human freedom is both morally significant and compatible with occasionalism. By attending to four distinctions made by Malebranche throughout his writings we can begin to understand first, what it means for human beings to exercise their freedom in a way that has some meaningful consequence, and (...)
     
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  37.  4
    Alan J. Parkin, John M. Gardiner & Rebecca Rosser (1995). Functional Aspects of Recollective Experience in Face Recognition. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):387-398.
    This article describes two experiments on awareness in recognition memory for novel faces. Two kinds of awareness, recollective experience and feelings of familiarity in the absence of recollective experience, were measured by "remember" and "know" responses. Experiment 1 showed that "remember" but not "know" responses were reduced by divided attention at study. Experiment 2 showed that massed versus spaced repetition of faces in the study list had the opposite effects on "remember" and "know" responses. Massed repetition increased "know" (...)
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  38.  9
    David Caplan & Gloria Waters (1999). Issues Regarding General and Domain-Specific Resources. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):114-122.
    Commentaries on our target article raise further questions about the validity of an undifferentiated central executive that supplies resources to all verbal tasks. Working memory tasks are more likely to measure divided attention capacities and the efficiency of performing tasks within specific domains than a shared resource pool. In our response to the commentaries, we review and further expand upon empirical findings that relate performance on working memory tasks to sentence processing, concluding that our view that the two (...)
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  39. Michael Barnwell (2010). The Problem of Negligent Omissions: Medieval Action Theories to the Rescue. Brill.
    Introduction : what's the problem? -- The problem may lurk in Aristotle's ethics -- Aristotle's akratic : foreshadowing a solution -- A negligent omission at the root of all sinfulness : Anselm and the Devil -- Negligent vs. non-negligent : a Thomistic distinction directing us toward a solution -- Can I have your divided attention? : Scotus, indistinct intellections, and type-1 negligent omissions almost solved -- I can't get you out of my mind : Scotus, lingering indistinct intellections, (...)
     
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  40. Dustin Stokes, Attention and the Cognitive Penetrability of Perception.
    One sceptical rejoinder to those who claim that sensory perception is cognitively penetrable is to appeal to the involvement of attention. So, while a phenomenon might initially look like one where, say, a perceiver’s beliefs are influencing her visual experience, another interpretation is that because the perceiver believes and desires as she does, she consequently shifts her spatial attention so as to change what she senses visually. But, the sceptic will urge, this is an entirely familiar phenomenon, and (...)
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  41. Sebastian Watzl (2011). Attention as Structuring of the Stream of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press 145.
    This paper defends and develops the structuring account of conscious attention: attention is the conscious mental process of structuring one’s stream of consciousness so that some parts of it are more central than others. In the first part of the paper, I motivate the structuring account. Drawing on a variety of resources I argue that the phenomenology of attention cannot be fully captured in terms of how the world appears to the subject, as well (...)
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  42. Declan Smithies (2011). Attention is Rational-Access Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press 247--273.
    This chapter argues that attention is a distinctive mode of consciousness, which plays an essential functional role in making information accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. The main line of argument can be stated quite simply. Attention is what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. But what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action is a distinctive (...)
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  43. Carolyn Dicey Jennings & Bence Nanay (2016). Action Without Attention. Analysis 76 (1):29-36.
    Wayne Wu argues that attention is necessary for action: since action requires a solution to the ‘Many–Many Problem’, and since only attention can solve the Many–Many Problem, attention is necessary for action. We question the first of these two steps and argue that it is based on an oversimplified distinction between actions and reflexes. We argue for a more complex typology of behaviours where one important category is action that does not require a (...)
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  44.  96
    Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor (...)
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  45. Wayne Wu (forthcoming). Shaking Up the Mind's Ground Floor: The Cognitive Penetration of Visual Attention. Journal of Philosophy.
    In this paper, I argue that visual attention is cognitively penetrated by intention. I present a detailed account of attention and its neural basis, drawing on a recent computational model of neural modulation during attention: divisive normalization. I argue that intention shifts computations during divisive normalization. The epistemic consequences of attentional bias are discussed.
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  46.  88
    Christopher Peacocke (2005). Joint Attention: Its Nature, Reflexivity, and Relation to Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press 298.
    The openness of joint awareness between two or more subjects is a perceptual phenomenon. It involves a certain mutual awareness between the subjects, an awareness that makes reference to that very awareness itself. Properly characterized, such awareness can generate iterated awareness ‘x is aware that y is aware that x is aware...’ to whatever level the subjects can sustain. The openness should not be characterized in terms of Lewis–Schiffer common knowledge, the conditions for which are not met in many basic (...)
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  47.  11
    Gary Hatfield (1998). Attention in Early Scientific Psychology. In Richard D. Wright (ed.), Visual Attention. Oxford University Press 3-25.
    Attention only "recently"--i.e. in the eighteenth century--achieved chapter status in psychology textbooks in which psychology is conceived as a natural science. This report first sets this entrance, by sketching the historical contexts in which psychology has been considered to be a natural science. It then traces the construction of phenomenological descriptions of attention from antiquity to the seventeenth century, noting various aspects of attention that were marked for discussion by Aristotle, Lucretius, Augustine, and Descartes. (...)
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  48.  68
    John Campbell (2005). Joint Attention and Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press 287--297.
    This chapter makes the case for a relational version of an experientialist view of joint attention. On an experientialist view of joint attention, shifting from solitary attention to joint attention involves a shift in the nature of your perceptual experience of the object attended to. A relational analysis of such a view explains the latter shift in terms of the idea that, in joint attention, it is a constituent of your (...)
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  49. Brian Bruya (2010). Introduction: Toward a Theory of Attention That Includes Effortless Attention. In Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press
    In this Introduction, I identify seven discrete aspects of attention brought to the fore by by considering the phenomenon of effortless attention: effort, decision-making, action syntax, agency, automaticity, expertise, and mental training. For each, I provide an overview of recent research, identify challenges to or gaps in current attention theory with respect to it, consider how attention theory can be advanced by including current research, and explain how relevant chapters of this volume (...)
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  50.  35
    Christopher Mole (2011). The Metaphysics of Attention. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press 60-77.
    This paper gives a brief presentation of adverbialism about attention, and explains some of the reasons why it gives an appealing account of attention's metaphysics.
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