Search results for 'Divided Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard (2003). Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting. Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.score: 75.0
  2. Anat Ninio & Daniel Kahneman (1974). Reaction Time in Focused and in Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):394.score: 75.0
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  3. William A. Johnston, Seth N. Greenberg, Ronald P. Fisher & David W. Martin (1970). Divided Attention: A Vehicle for Monitoring Memory Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):164.score: 75.0
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  4. Harvey G. Shulman, Seth N. Greenberg & JonPaul Martin (1971). Intertask Delay as a Parameter of Perceptual Deficit in Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (3):439-440.score: 51.0
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  5. Elizabeth Spelke (1976). Skills of Divided Attention. Cognition 4 (3):215-230.score: 45.0
  6. Robert Dunn (1995). Motivated Irrationality and Divided Attention. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):325 – 336.score: 45.0
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  7. Yuh-Shiow Lee & Huang-Mou Lee (2011). Divided Attention Facilitates Intentional Forgetting: Evidence From Item-Method Directed Forgetting. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):618-626.score: 45.0
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  8. Mathilde Sacher, Laurence Taconnat, Céline Souchay & Michel Isingrini (2009). Divided Attention at Encoding: Effect on Feeling-of-Knowing. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):754-761.score: 45.0
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  9. Eyal M. Reingold & Jiye Shen (2001). Investigating the Visual Span in Comparative Search: The Effects of Task Difficulty and Divided Attention. Cognition 81 (2):57-67.score: 45.0
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  10. Nelson Cowan (2012). Focused and Divided Attention to the Eyes and Ears : A Research Journey. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 32.score: 45.0
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  11. Johnson A. (2008). Using Frequency Tagging to Investigate the Neurocorrelates of Divided Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 45.0
  12. Jerwen Jou & Richard Jackson Harris (1992). The Effect of Divided Attention on Speech Production. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (4):301-304.score: 45.0
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  13. Tamaryan Knarik & Rajan Ramesh (2013). Divided Attention Across Complex Audio-Visual Tasks Under Conditions of Signal Interference. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 45.0
  14. Bherer L. (2010). A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study (fNIRS) of the Relationship Between Glucose Regulation and Divided Attention in Older Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
  15. Ronald Okada & David Burrows (1974). Divided Attention and High-Speed Memory Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):191.score: 45.0
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  16. Matthew A. Palmer, Neil Brewer, Nathan Weber & Ambika Nagesh (2013). The Confidence-Accuracy Relationship for Eyewitness Identification Decisions: Effects of Exposure Duration, Retention Interval, and Divided Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (1):55.score: 45.0
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  17. Maha Adamo, Carson Pun, Jay Pratt & Susanne Ferber (2008). Your Divided Attention, Please! The Maintenance of Multiple Attentional Control Sets Over Distinct Regions in Space. Cognition 107 (1):295-303.score: 45.0
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  18. Lars BÄckman & Lars-GÖran Nilsson (1991). Effects of Divided Attention on Free and Cued Recall of Verbal Events and Action Events. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):51-54.score: 45.0
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  19. Laurence Casini, Boris Burle & Noël Nguyen (2009). Speech Perception Engages a General Timer: Evidence From a Divided Attention Word Identification Task. Cognition 112 (2):318-322.score: 45.0
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  20. Fergus I. M. Craik (2006). Remembering Items and Their Contexts: Effects of Aging and Divided Attention. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.score: 45.0
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  21. Fergus I. M. Craik, Richard Govoni, Moshe Naveh-Benjamin & Nicole D. Anderson (1996). The Effects of Divided Attention on Encoding and Retrieval Processes in Human Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (2):159.score: 45.0
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  22. Ami Eidels, James T. Townsend & Daniel Algom (2010). Comparing Perception of Stroop Stimuli in Focused Versus Divided Attention Paradigms: Evidence for Dramatic Processing Differences. Cognition 114 (2):129-150.score: 45.0
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  23. Er Hafter & Am Bonnel (1992). Divided Attention to Visual and Auditory-Stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):485-485.score: 45.0
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  24. William Hirst (1984). Practice and Divided Attention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):72.score: 45.0
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  25. Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Jill D. Waring & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2014). The Effect of Divided Attention on Emotion-Induced Memory Narrowing. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):881-892.score: 45.0
  26. M. Naveh-Benjamin (2006). Binding of Memories: Adult-Age Differences and the Effects of Divided Attention in Young Adults on Episodic Memory. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oup Oxford. 627--656.score: 45.0
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  27. Romina Palermo & Gillian Rhodes (2002). The Influence of Divided Attention on Holistic Face Perception. Cognition 82 (3):225-257.score: 45.0
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  28. Sturm W. (2008). Age-Related Differences in Neural Activity Resulting From Divided Attention Tasks: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 45.0
  29. Vasudevi Reddy (2003). On Being the Object of Attention: Implications for Self-Other Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):397-402.score: 39.0
  30. Geoffrey F. Woodman & Steven J. Luck (2003). Dissociations Among Attention, Perception, and Awareness During Object-Substitution Masking. Psychological Science 14 (6):605-611.score: 39.0
  31. W. Hirst (1986). Aspects of Divided and Selective Attention. In David A. Oakley (ed.), Mind and Brain. Methuen. 105--141.score: 36.0
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  32. L. Fasotti M. E. Van Kessel, A. C. H. Geurts, W. H. Brouwer (2013). Visual Scanning Training for Neglect After Stroke with and Without a Computerized Lane Tracking Dual Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 33.0
    Neglect patients typically fail to explore the contralesional half-space. During visual scanning training, these patients learn to consciously pay attention to contralesional target stimuli. It has been suggested that combining scanning training with methods addressing non-spatial attention might enhance training results. In the present study, a dual task training component was added to a visual scanning training (i.e. Training di Scanning Visuospaziale – TSVS; Pizzamiglio et al., 1990). Twenty-nine subacute right hemisphere stroke patients were semi-randomly assigned to an (...)
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  33. Maxime Lussier, Christine Gagnon & Louis Bherer (2012). An Investigation of Response and Stimulus Modality Transfer Effects After Dual-Task Training in Younger and Older. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 31.0
    It has been shown that dual-task training leads to significant improvement in dual-task performances in younger and older adults. However, the extent to which training benefits to untrained tasks requires further investigation. The present study assessed (a) whether dual-task training leads to cross-modality transfer in untrained tasks using new stimuli and/or motor responses modalities, (b) whether transfer effects are related to improvement in working memory and/or enhanced response coordination, (c) whether there are age-related differences in transfer effects. Twenty-three younger and (...)
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  34. Louis Bherer Maxime Lussier, Christine Gagnon (2012). An Investigation of Response and Stimulus Modality Transfer Effects After Dual-Task Training in Younger and Older. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 31.0
    It has been shown that dual-task training leads to significant improvement in dual-task performances in younger and older adults. However, the extent to which training benefits to untrained tasks requires further investigation. The present study assessed (a) whether dual-task training leads to cross-modality transfer in untrained tasks using new stimuli and/or motor responses modalities, (b) whether transfer effects are related to improvement in working memory and/or enhanced response coordination, (c) whether there are age-related differences in transfer effects. Twenty-three younger and (...)
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  35. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 30.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to both questions, and (...)
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  36. Christopher Mole (2010). Attention is Cognitive Unison: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Highlights of a difficult history -- The preliminary identification of our topic -- Approaches -- Bradley's protest -- James's disjunctive theory -- The source of Bradley's dissatisfaction -- Behaviourism and after -- Heirs of Bradley in the twentieth century -- The underlying metaphysical issue -- Explanatory tactics -- The basic distinction -- Metaphysical categories and taxonomies -- Adverbialism, multiple realizability, and natural kinds -- Adverbialism and levels of explanation -- Taxonomies and supervenience relations -- Rejecting the process : first view (...)
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  37. Vitória Piai Ardi Roelofs (2011). Attention Demands of Spoken Word Planning: A Review. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 30.0
    Attention and language are among the most intensively researched abilities in the cognitive neurosciences, but the relation between these abilities has largely been neglected. There is increasing evidence, however, that linguistic processes, such as those underlying the planning of words, cannot proceed without paying some form of attention. Here, we review evidence that word planning requires some but not full attention. The evidence comes from chronometric studies of word planning in picture naming and word reading under (...) attention conditions. It is generally assumed that the central attention demands of a process are indexed by the extent that the process delays the performance of a concurrent unrelated task. The studies measured the speed and accuracy of linguistic and nonlinguistic responding as well as eye gaze durations reflecting the allocation of attention. First, empirical evidence indicates that in several task situations, processes up to and including phonological encoding in word planning delay, or are delayed by, the performance of concurrent unrelated nonlinguistic tasks. These findings suggest that word planning requires central attention. Second, empirical evidence indicates that conflicts in word planning may be resolved while concurrently performing an unrelated nonlinguistic task, making a task decision, or making a go/no-go decision. These findings suggest that word planning does not require full central attention. We outline a computationally implemented theory of attention and word planning, and describe at various points the outcomes of computer simulations that demonstrate the utility of the theory in accounting for the key findings. Finally, we indicate how attention deficits may contribute to impaired language performance, such as in individuals with specific language impairment. (shrink)
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  38. David Shinar & Mari R. Jones (1973). Effects of Set-Inducing Instructions on Recall From Dichotic Inputs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (2):239.score: 30.0
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  39. E. A. Franz (2012). The Allocation of Attention to Learning of Goal-Directed Actions: A Cognitive Neuroscience Framework Focusing on the Basal Ganglia. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    The present paper builds on the idea that attention is largely in service of our actions. A framework and model which captures the allocation of attention for learning of goal-directed actions is proposed and developed. This framework highlights an evolutionary model based on the notion that rudimentary brain functions have become embedded into increasingly higher levels of networks which all contribute to adaptive learning. Background literature is presented alongside key evidence based on experimental studies in the so-called ‘split-brain’ (...)
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  40. Phillip J. Holcomb Kirk R. Daffner, Elise C. Tarbi, Anna E. Haring, Tatyana Y. Zhuravleva, Xue Sun, Dorene M. Rentz (2012). The Influence of Executive Capacity on Selective Attention and Subsequent Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    Recent investigations that suggest selective attention is dependent on top-down control mechanisms lead to the expectation that individuals with high executive capacity would exhibit more robust neural indices of selective attention. This prediction was tested by using event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine differences in markers of information processing across 25 subjects divided into 2 groups based on high vs. average executive capacity, as defined by neuropsychological test scores. Subjects performed an experimental task requiring selective attention to (...)
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  41. Declan Smithies (2011). Attention is Rational-Access Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 247--273.score: 21.0
    This chapter argues that attention is a distinctive mode of consciousness, which plays an essential functional role in making information accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. The main line of argument can be stated quite simply. Attention is what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. But what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action is a distinctive mode of (...)
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  42. Sebastian Watzl (2011). Attention as Structuring of the Stream of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 145.score: 21.0
    This paper defends and develops the structuring account of conscious attention: attention is the conscious mental process of structuring one’s stream of consciousness so that some parts of it are more central than others. In the first part of the paper, I motivate the structuring account. Drawing on a variety of resources I argue that the phenomenology of attention cannot be fully captured in terms of how the world appears to the subject, as well as against an (...)
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  43. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 21.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the (...)
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  44. Brian Bruya (2010). Introduction: Toward a Theory of Attention That Includes Effortless Attention. In , Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.score: 21.0
    In this Introduction, I identify seven discrete aspects of attention brought to the fore by by considering the phenomenon of effortless attention: effort, decision-making, action syntax, agency, automaticity, expertise, and mental training. For each, I provide an overview of recent research, identify challenges to or gaps in current attention theory with respect to it, consider how attention theory can be advanced by including current research, and explain how relevant chapters of this volume offer such advances.
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  45. Christopher Peacocke (2005). Joint Attention: Its Nature, Reflexivity, and Relation to Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 298.score: 21.0
    The openness of joint awareness between two or more subjects is a perceptual phenomenon. It involves a certain mutual awareness between the subjects, an awareness that makes reference to that very awareness itself. Properly characterized, such awareness can generate iterated awareness ‘x is aware that y is aware that x is aware...’ to whatever level the subjects can sustain. The openness should not be characterized in terms of Lewis–Schiffer common knowledge, the conditions for which are not met in many basic (...)
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  46. Johannes Roessler (2005). Joint Attention and the Problem of Other Minds. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 21.0
    The question of what it means to be aware of others as subjects of mental states is often construed as the question of how we are epistemically justified in attributing mental states to others. The dominant answer to this latter question is that we are so justified in virtue of grasping the role of mental states in explaining observed behaviour. This chapter challenges this picture and formulates an alternative by reflecting on the interpretation of early joint attention interactions. It (...)
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  47. John Campbell (2005). Joint Attention and Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 287--297.score: 21.0
    This chapter makes the case for a relational version of an experientialist view of joint attention. On an experientialist view of joint attention, shifting from solitary attention to joint attention involves a shift in the nature of your perceptual experience of the object attended to. A relational analysis of such a view explains the latter shift in terms of the idea that, in joint attention, it is a constituent of your experience that the other person (...)
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  48. Jane Heal (2005). Joint Attention and Understanding the Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Oxford University PressJoint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 34--44.score: 21.0
    It is plausible to think, as many developmental psychologists do, that joint attention is important in the development of getting a full grasp on psychological notions. This chapter argues that this role of joint attention is best understood in the context of the simulation theory about the nature of psychological understanding rather than in the context of the theory. Episodes of joint attention can then be seen not as good occasions for learning a theory of mind but (...)
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  49. Brian Bruya (2010). Apertures, Draw, and Syntax: Remodeling Attention. In , Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press. 219.score: 21.0
    Because psychological studies of attention and cognition are most commonly performed within the strict confines of the laboratory or take cognitively impaired patients as subjects, it is difficult to be sure that resultant models of attention adequately account for the phenomenon of effortless attention. The problem is not only that effortless attention is resistant to laboratory study. A further issue is that because the laboratory is the most common way to approach attention, models resulting from (...)
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  50. Christopher Mole (2011). The Metaphysics of Attention. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 60.score: 21.0
    This paper gives a brief presentation of adverbialism about attention, and explains some of the reasons why it gives an appealing account of attention's metaphysics.
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