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  1. Dmitry Shlapentokh (forthcoming). Slavic, European, or Asiatic? F. H. Duchinski on the Origins of the Russian People. The European Legacy:1-12.
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  2. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2012). Love and Hate of Foreign Lands: The Nineteenth-Century Russian Intelligentsia. The European Legacy 17 (1):61 - 69.
    Love and hate follow the same patterns among émigrés as among people in general. Among the several models of the love émigrés feel for a foreign land is pragmatic love, based not so much on real attachment as on interests. For an Orwellian Big Brother this love does not necessarily imply direct material benefits but could be an attempt to justify something that has already occurred?emigration, for example. Pragmatic love for a foreign land and people and a corresponding hatred for (...)
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  3. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2012). Lev Gumilev: The Ideologist of the Soviet Empire. History of European Ideas 38 (3):483-492.
    Summary Russian intellectuals like to appeal to examples of foreign history. Lev Gumilev's views on history are a good example. Gumilev was one of the most well-known representatives of Eurasianism, which was in turn one of the most interesting intellectual constructs in Russian historiography. Gumilev believed that Russia was born not from Kievan Rus?the view of the majority of Russian historians of his time?but from the empire of the Mongols. While Gumilev saw Europe as a hostile entity to Russia/Eurasia, this (...)
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  4. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2007). Dugin Eurasianism: A Window on the Minds of the Russian Elite or an Intellectual Ploy? Studies in East European Thought 59 (3):215 - 236.
    This paper considers the views of Alexander Dugin, a leading proponent of Eurasianism in contemporary Russia. The point of his teaching is the preservation of the traditional social/cultural make-up of each civilization. He also believes that the Russian Slavs together with the minorities of the Russian Federation constitute a quasi-unity of Eurasian civilization. He emphasizes that globalism, led by the USA, is a mortal threat to the cultural identity of Russia/Eurasia and all other civilizations. For this reason the USA and (...)
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  5. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2001). Cosmism in European Thought. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:497-546.
    European thought has had contradictory visions of humanity’s place in the cosmos. Some believed that humanity might survive indefinitely. Yet most of the modern thinkers assumed that humanity, in general, was not different from other species and would eventually disappear. In Russia, a different view prevailed. It was assumed that humanity belonged to a sort of “chosen species” and would have a different destiny from the other species. This idea of “humanity as a chosen species” was supported with the idea (...)
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  6. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2000). The Problem of Russian Democracy: Can Russia Rise Again? Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (01):269-.
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  7. Dmitry Shlapentokh (1996). The Fedorovian Roots of Stalinism. Philosophy Today 40 (3):388-404.
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  8. Dmitry Shlapentokh (1992). The End of the Russian Idea. Studies in East European Thought 43 (3):199-217.
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  9. Dmitry Shlapentokh (1991). The Materialist Conception of History. History of European Ideas 13 (3):282-284.
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