Search results for 'Doctor Who' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  17
    Kevin S. Decker (2013). Who is Who?: The Philosophy of Doctor Who. I.B. Tauris.
    This is the first in-depth philosophical investigation of Doctor Who in popular culture.
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  2. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Doctor Who and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy Now 89 (Mar/Apr):43-44.
    The good Doctor has a lot to say about philosophy.
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  3.  9
    Giles Birchley (2013). Doctor? Who? Nurses, Patient's Best Interests and Treatment Withdrawal: When No Doctor is Available, Should Nurses Withdraw Treatment From Patients? Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):96-108.
    Where a decision has been made to stop futile treatment of critically ill patients on an intensive care unit – what is termed withdrawal of treatment in the UK – yet no doctor is available to perform the actions of withdrawal, nurses may be called upon to perform key tasks. In this paper I present two moral justifications for this activity by offering answers to two major questions. One is to ask if it can be in patients' best interests (...)
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  4.  12
    Tim Jones (2012). Courtland Lewis and Paula Smithka, Eds. (2011) Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):276-280.
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  5. I. G. Finlay (2015). What is It to Do Good Medical Ethics? From the Perspective of a Practising Doctor Who is in Parliament. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (1):83-86.
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  6.  11
    B. Molewijk & R. Ahlzen (2011). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 13: Should the School Doctor Contact the Mother of a 17-Year-Old Girl Who has Expressed Suicidal Thoughts? [REVIEW] Clinical Ethics 6 (1):5-10.
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  7.  3
    Merel van Ommen, Serena Daalmans & Addy Weijers (2014). Who Is the Doctor in This House? Analyzing the Moral Evaluations of Medical Students and Physicians ofHouse, M.D. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (4):61-74.
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  8.  3
    Donald R. Forsdyke (forthcoming). Doctor-Scientist-Patients Who Barketh Not: The Quantified Self-Movement and Crowd-Sourcing Research. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.
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  9.  8
    Low Yin Yee Sharon (2011). 'Who is Responsible for This Patient?': A Case Study Analysis of Conflicting Interests Between Patient, Family and Doctor in a Singaporean Context. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):261-271.
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  10.  6
    Fenella Rouse (1992). Mrs. Wanglie and “Doctor Knows Best” and Making Decisions for Those Who Cannot Decide for Themselves: Autonomy in Two Recent Cases. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (2):165.
    Since at least the Karen Ann Quinlan case, the idea of autonomy has always been central to the discussion about whether to given life-prolonging treatment. Those on different sides of the debate may disagree strongly about some of the issues, but the importance of the patient's autonomy has been accepted by people of widely different points of view.
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  11. George J. Annas (1978). Who to Call When the Doctor Is Sick. Hastings Center Report 8 (6):18-20.
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  12. Y. Y. S. Low (2011). 'Who is Responsible for This Patient?': A Case Study Analysis of Conflicting Interests Between Patient, Family and Doctor in a Singaporean Context. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):261 - 271.
     
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  13. Stacey Olster (1998). "Two People Who Didn't Argue, Even, Except Over the Use of the Subjunctive": Jean Harris, the Scarsdale Diet Doctor Murder, and Diana Trilling. Critical Inquiry 25 (1):77-94.
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  14. Giorgina Barbara Piccoli, Laura Sacchetti, Laura Verzè, Franco Cavallo & Working Group of the Students of the Torino Medical School (2015). Doctor Can I Buy a New Kidney? I've Heard It Isn't Forbidden: What is the Role of the Nephrologist When Dealing with a Patient Who Wants to Buy a Kidney? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):1-10.
    Organ trafficking is officially banned in several countries and by the main Nephrology Societies. However, this practice is widespread and is allowed or tolerated in many countries, hence, in the absence of a universal law, the caregiver may be asked for advice, placing him/her in a difficult balance between legal aspects, moral principles and ethical judgments.In spite of the Istanbul declaration, which is a widely shared position statement against organ trafficking, the controversy on mercenary organ donation is still open and (...)
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  15. Peter A. Sutton (2015). "Weeping Angels and Many Worlds". In Courtland Lewis Paula Smithka (ed.), More Doctor Who and Philosophy. Open Court Press 69-76.
    The Doctor, like many time-travelers, often finds himself in the midst of a causal loop. Events in the future cause events in the past, which in turn cause the future events. There is a worry that a person in this situation could never have true libertarian freedom: facts about the past entail their future actions, so they couldn't do otherwise than they in fact do. -/- In this paper, I argue that there are logically coherent (though perhaps unlikely!) ways (...)
     
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  16.  10
    Dana Cojocaru, Sorin Cace & Cristina Gavrilovici (2013). Christian and Secular Dimensions of the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (34):37-56.
    Trust in the doctor-patient relationship is an indispensable structural element for the medical profession. The discourse concerning trust and its importance in the healthcare context, although quite old, elicits increasingly more interest in research, especially for empirical approaches. The importance of trust in the doctor and in the medical profession can be demonstrated by starting from the Christian meaning of illness and medicine ; generally, the patristic sources see medicine and physicians as God’s gifts. T he perception of (...)
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  17.  6
    Tom Sorell (2001). Citizen–Patient/Citizen–Doctor. Health Care Analysis 9 (1):25-39.
    In a welfare states, no typical user of health care services isonly a patient; and no typical provider of these services is simply a doctor, nurse or paramedic. Occupiers of these rolesalso have distinctive relations and responsibilities – as citizens– to medical services, responsibilities that are widely acknowledgedby those who live in welfare states. Outside welfare states, thisfusion of civic consciousness with involvement in health care isless pronounced or missing altogether. But the globalisation of avery comprehensive understanding of human (...)
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  18. Jennings Crookshank (2008). Today and Tomorrow Vol 10 Science & Medicine: The Mongol in Our Midst Prometheus, or Biology and the Advancement of Man Metanthropos or the Body of the Future Pygmalion or the Doctor of the Future the Conquest of Cancer. Routledge.
    The Mongol in Our Midst F G Crookshank Originally published in 1925. "A brilliant piece of speculative induction" Saturday Review Combining anthropology, psychology, geography, science and medicine, this volume was a ground-breaking study in the area of race, ethnicity and eugenics, when first published and has to be read in the appropriate historical, social and scientific context of the early twentieth century. 120 pp, 24 b&w plates Prometheus or Biology and the Advancement of Man H S Jennings Originally published in (...)
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  19.  6
    Elena C. Strauman & Bethany C. Goodier (2011). The Doctor(s) in House: An Analysis of the Evolution of the Television Doctor-Hero. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):31-46.
    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the “television doctor” by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate (...)
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  20.  4
    Swapan Chakravorty (2016). Being Staged: Unconcealment Through Reading and Performance in Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Bharata's Nātyaśāstra. Philosophy East and West 66 (1):40-59.
    Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, like Goethe’s Faust, begins in Faustus’ study. Faustus, renowned for his learning, is reading, going through the entire range of medieval disciplines — Aristotelian logic, Galenic medicine, Justinian law, Jerome’s Vulgate. His rapid deductions, after quoting to himself snatches from the concerned texts, read like a pastiche of the vanity of all human knowledge one encounters in De vanitate scientiarum by Cornelius Agrippa, a rumored alchemist and master of the occult.1 Faustus rejects logic as sterile, (...)
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  21.  18
    D. Cox (1996). Should a Doctor Prescribe Hormone Replacement Therapy Which has Been Manufactured From Mare's Urine? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):199-203.
    Many clinicians are experiencing consumer resistance to the prescription of equine HRT (that is hormone replacement therapy which has been manufactured from mare's urine). In this paper I consider the ethical implications of prescribing these preparations. I decide that patients should have a right to refuse such treatment but also ask whether a prescribing doctor should choose one preparation over another on moral grounds. I determine that there is prima facie evidence to suggest that mares may suffer and that (...)
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  22.  11
    F. E. Fox, G. J. Taylor, M. F. Harris, K. J. Rodham, J. Sutton, J. Scott & B. Robinson (2010). "It's Crucial They're Treated as Patients": Ethical Guidance and Empirical Evidence Regarding Treating Doctor-Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):7-11.
    Ethical guidance from the British Medical Association about treating doctor–patients is compared and contrasted with evidence from a qualitative study of general practitioners who have been patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 GPs who had experienced a significant illness. Their experiences were discussed and issues about both being and treating doctor–patients were revealed. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to evaluate the data. In this article data extracts are used to illustrate and discuss three key points that summarise (...)
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  23.  5
    David C. Thomasma (1992). Models of the Doctor-Patient Relationship and the Ethics Committee: Part One. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (1):11.
    Past ages of medical care are condemned in modern philosophical and medical literature as being too paternalistic. The normal account of good medicine in the past was, indeed, paternalistic in an offensive way to modern persons. Imagine a Jean Paul Sartre going to the doctor and being treated without his consent or even his knowledge of what will transpire during treatment! From Hippocratic times until shortly after World War II, medicine operated in a closed, clubby manner. The knowledge learned (...)
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  24.  11
    Evans Mupela, Paul Mustarde & Huw Jones (2011). Telemedicine in Primary Health, The Virtual Doctor Project Zambia. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):9-.
    This paper is a commentary on a project application of telemedicine to alleviate primary health care problems in Lundazi district in the Eastern province of Zambia. The project dubbed 'The Virtual Doctor Project' will use hard body vehicles fitted with satellite communication devices and modern medical equipment to deliver primary health care services to some of the neediest areas of the country. The relevance and importance of the project lies in the fact that these areas are hard-to-reach due to (...)
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  25.  3
    Ghassan Moubarak, Aurélie Guiot, Ygal Benhamou, Alexandra Benhamou & Sarah Hariri (2011). Facebook Activity of Residents and Fellows and its Impact on the Doctor–Patient Relationship. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):101-104.
    Aim Facebook is an increasingly popular online social networking site. The purpose of this study was to describe the Facebook activity of residents and fellows and their opinions regarding the impact of Facebook on the doctor–patient relationship. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was emailed to 405 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009. Results Of the 202 participants who returned the questionnaire (50%), 147 (73%) had a Facebook profile. Among responders, 138 (99%) displayed their real (...)
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  26.  4
    M. Nicolson (2010). Death and Doctor Hornbook by Robert Burns: A View From Medical History. Medical Humanities 36 (1):23-26.
    Robert Burns's poem, Death and Doctor Hornbook, 1785, tells of the drunken narrator's late night encounter with Death. The Grim Reaper is annoyed that ‘Dr Hornbook’, a local schoolteacher who has taken to selling medications and giving medical advice, is successfully thwarting his efforts to gather victims. The poet fears that the local gravedigger will be unemployed but Death reassures him that this will not be the case since Hornbook kills more than he cures. Previous commentators have regarded the (...)
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  27.  6
    Gordon Graham (1987). The Doctor, the Rich, and the Indigent. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (1):51-61.
    This essay explores the major conflict between doing the best for indigents requiring health care and not unfairly imposing burdens on those who pay for that care through cost-shifting. The author argues that there is in fact no dilemma or conflict of duties presented here, but only because the doctor's concern with justice in bearing the burden of health care requires a system within which different levels of health care are available and in which indigent care is provided in (...)
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  28.  2
    L. Trevena (2006). Impact of Privacy Legislation on the Number and Characteristics of People Who Are Recruited for Research: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):473-477.
    Background: Privacy laws have recently created restrictions on how researchers can approach study participants.Method: In a randomised trial of 152 patients, 50–74 years old, in a family practice, 60 were randomly selected to opt-out and 92 to opt-in methods. Patients were sent an introductory letter by their doctor in two phases, opt-out before and opt-in after introduction of the new Privacy Legislation in December 2001. Opt-out patients were contacted by researchers. Opt-in patients were contacted if patients responded by email, (...)
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  29.  1
    M. Kottow (1983). Medical Ethics: Who Decides What? Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):105-108.
    The FME symposium on teaching medical ethics takes up the issue of competence and responsibility in matters concerning bioethics (1). Foreseeably, the medical participants argue that physicians are prepared, or can be easily prepared, to handle all relevant aspects of medical ethics. The contrary position is sustained by the philosophically trained participants, who believe that physicians do not, in fact cannot, sufficiently manage medico-ethical problems. This paper sees a role for both parties. Medical ethicists should properly be involved in medical (...)
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  30.  3
    Annemarie Gethmann-Siefert (2003). Consultation Instead of Prescription?A Model for the Structure of the Doctor?Patient Relationship. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (1):1-27.
    Against the usual paternalism, this article develops the proposition to structure the interaction between the doctor and the patient as an inter-subjective consultation. This means that the "information" of the patient prior to treatment, when "informed consent" is secured, as well as the actual medical treatment would have to be turned into an interaction between two responsible individuals. The "irresponsibility" of this patient, which is supposed to result from his "uninformedness", as is often argued in favour of keeping to (...)
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  31. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
     
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  32. Robbie Davis-Floyd & Gloria St John (1998). From Doctor to Healer: The Transformative Journey. Rutgers University Press.
    Why would a successful physician who has undergone seven years of rigorous medical training take the trouble to seek out and learn to practice alternative methods of healing such as homeopathy and Chinese medicine? From Doctor to Healer answers this question as it traces the transformational journeys of physicians who move across the philosophical spectrum of American medicine from doctor to healer. Robbie Davis-Floyd and Gloria St. John conducted extensive interviews to discover how and why physicians make the (...)
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  33.  1
    Steven Shapin (2000). Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and its Therapies. British Journal for the History of Science 33 (2):131-154.
    During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. René Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim and, (...)
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  34.  35
    Anita Catlin (1996). The Dilemma of Jehovah's Witness Children Who Need Blood to Survive. HEC Forum 8 (4):195-207.
    Medical researchers must continue to develop and test non-blood oxygen-transport products. Resources provided by the Jehovah's Witness Hospital Assistance Line must be consulted. Sickle cell researchers must continue to test non-blood treatment. Information about non-blood treatments must be disbursed. Ways to enhance parental comport as the laws further and further support children's best interest must be provided. Information regarding cultural diversity must be disseminated. Hospitals and healthcare agencies that have not done so must institute the use of ethics consulting or (...)
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  35.  9
    M. Yarborough (1997). The Reluctant Retained Witness: Alleged Sexual Misconduct in the Doctor/Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):345-364.
    Testifying as an expert ethics witness raises a number of important issues. These include: the prospect of generating adverse publicity for oneself and one's institution, avoiding bias, giving testimony that is at odds with testimony given by colleagues, potential conflicts of interest introduced by reimbursement, the need of those who hear the testimony of bioethicists to appreciate the nature of moral expertise, the difficulty of assessing the quality of legal evidence which emerges from adversarial legal proceedings, and the need to (...)
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  36.  19
    Anke Timmermann (2008). Doctor's Order: An Early Modern Doctor's Alchemical Notebooks. Early Science and Medicine 13 (1):25-52.
    This is a case study on a series of at least thirty-four sixteenth-century notebooks from the Sloane collection, which reconsiders early modern note taking techniques and the organisation of knowledge. These notebooks were written by an anonymous compiler, a physician who read widely in the alchemical and medical literature available in his lifetime, the late sixteenth century. In the alchemica, he devotes individual volumes to specific alchemical substances, which are connected with each other by means of a complex system of (...)
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  37.  8
    D. A. Greaves (1991). Can Compulsory Removal Ever Be Justified for Adults Who Are Mentally Competent? Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):189-194.
    Section 47 of the National Assistance Act is controversial in that it makes provision for the compulsory removal and care of mentally competent adults in certain limited circumstances. A case is described in which it is argued that compulsory management could be justified. This is because the diversity and potentially conflicting nature of the relevant considerations involved in this and a restricted range of other cases, defies their being captured in any wholly rational moral scheme. It follows that if the (...)
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  38.  1
    Sander L. Gilman (1987). The Struggle of Psychiatry with Psychoanalysis: Who Won? Critical Inquiry 13 (2):293-313.
    What if Wittgenstein and Popper were right after all? What is psychoanalysis is not “scientific,” not scientific by any contemporary definition—including Adolf Grünbaum’s—but what if it works all the same?1 What if psychoanalysis is all right in practice, but the theory isn’t scientific? Indeed, what if “science” is defined ideologically rather than philosophically? If we so redefine “science,” it is not to dismiss psychoanalysis but to understand its origin and impact, to follow the ideological dialectic between the history of psychiatry, (...)
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  39.  2
    Peter Grantham (1981). Ethical Issues and the Family Doctor. Bioethics Quarterly 3 (3-4):180-189.
    Issues recognized as having ethical or moral components are becoming increasingly common, for society in general, the health care system and for general practitioner/family physicians in particular. Some of the peculiar problems for GP's relate to the provision of continuing, comprehensive, primary medical care to large numbers of individuals who provide extensive potential for conflict between all the involved elements: patients, physicians, families, consultants and societal attitudes. There is a need for more formal education programs.
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  40.  1
    Randy Rockney (1991). Life Threatening Emergencies Involving Children in the Literature of the Doctor. Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (4):153-161.
    Life threatening emergencies involving infants and children are inherently dramatic, tension-filled situations. It is no wonder, then, that depictions of such events can be found in literature by and about doctors. In many ways, too, such depictions can illuminate key aspects of such events, such as the physician's own anxiety and the tensions between the various people involved, better than the medical literature. Hence it is suggested that the study of literary depictions of pediatric emergencies might be a useful adjunct (...)
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  41.  2
    D. Jeffries (2006). Dr Bruno Sachs Addresses an Audience of First Year Medical Students: An Extract From the Writing of Martin Winckler, French Doctor and Writer. Medical Humanities 32 (1):1-3.
    One of the authors of this paper has been impressed by the work of the second author for some time. On reading one of his works, Les Trois Médecins, DJ was so struck by a particular passage that he attempted a translation. He received not only permission from Winckler to seek publication but also help with the translation. Along with that translation, which forms the body of this article, the passage has been set in context by MW, who also provides (...)
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  42.  2
    Marvin E. Herring & Edmund L. Erde (1994). HMO Doctor – for Nonsmokers Only? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (1):67.
    Recently, a physician requested permission to include in the information packet about himself that he would not accept patients who smoke and would not continue the care of current patients who smoke. His poignant statement follows.
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  43.  7
    Fredrick R. Abrams (2006). Doctors on the Edge: Will Your Doctor Break the Rules for You? Sentient Publications.
    A collection of dramatic accounts about doctors who have faced the moral dilemma of choosing between obeying rules and doing what is best for a patient offers insight into the essential principles of medical ethics and their impact on ...
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  44. Anthony Bonner (ed.) (1994). Doctor Illuminatus: A Ramon Llull Reader. Princeton University Press.
    For this new anthology, Anthony Bonner has chosen central texts from his acclaimed two-volume compilation Selected Works of Ramon Llull. Available for the first time in an affordable format, these works serve as an introduction to the life and writings of the Catalan philosopher, mystic, and theologian who lived from 1232 to 1316. Founder of a school of Arabic and other languages, Llull was also a poet and novelist and one of the creators of literary Catalan.This volume contains three prefaces (...)
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  45. Letitia Helen Burridge (2014). Normalising The Good Doctor … and Other Health Services Personnel. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):113-113.
    The topic of Ron Paterson’s book which was recently reviewed by Deborah Oyer only scratches the surface of a disturbing problem that is not confined to medicine, as health care delivery is a multidisciplinary experience for patients. I hear stories from patients about bullying dieticians, callous nurses, and institutions that espouse patient-centred care yet fail to deliver it to individuals who are unwell, worried, and vulnerable in an unfamiliar environment into which they have come for help. Maybe being conversant with (...)
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  46.  63
    Els Maeckelberghe (2004). Feminist Ethic of Care: A Third Alternative Approach. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (4):317-327.
    A man with Alzheimer's who wanders around, a caregiver who disconnects the alarm, a daughter acting on het own, and a doctor who is not consulted set the stage for a feminist reflection on capacity/competence assessment. Feminist theory attempts to account for gender inequality in the political and in the epistemological realm. One of its tasks is to unravel the settings in which actual practices, i.c. capacity/competence assessment take place and offer an alternative. In this article the focus will (...)
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  47.  4
    B. G. Haire (2013). Ethics of Medical Care and Clinical Research: A Qualitative Study of Principal Investigators in Biomedical HIV Prevention Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):231-235.
    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are (...)
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  48. Deborah Hellman (2009). Willfully Blind for Good Reason. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (3):301-316.
    Willful blindness is not an appropriate substitute for knowledge in crimes that require a mens rea of knowledge because an actor who contrives his own ignorance is only sometimes as culpable as a knowing actor. This paper begins with the assumption that the classic willfully blind actor—the drug courier—is culpable. If so, any plausible account of willful blindness must provide criteria that find this actor culpable. This paper then offers two limiting cases: a criminal defense lawyer defending a client he (...)
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  49.  66
    John J. Drummond (2004). 'Cognitive Impenetrability' and the Complex Intentionality of the Emotions. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):109-126.
    When a young boy playing in a wooded area, I tripped over exposed roots extending from the trunk of a tree. I threw my arms out in front of me to break my fall and disturbed a nest of bees. As I lay on the ground, I was repeatedly stung by bees until I could regain my feet and run away. Frightened and in a great deal of pain - that is what I remember most vividly - I walked home. (...)
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  50.  32
    Josef Perner & Eva Rafetseder (2011). Is Reasoning From Counterfactual Antecedents Evidence for Counterfactual Reasoning? Thinking and Reasoning 16 (2):131-155.
    In most developmental studies the only error children could make on counterfactual tasks was to answer with the current state of affairs. It was concluded that children who did not show this error are able to reason counterfactually. However, children might have avoided this error by using basic conditional reasoning (Rafetseder, Cristi-Vargas, & Perner, 2010). Basic conditional reasoning takes background assumptions represented as conditionals about how the world works. If an antecedent of one of these conditionals is provided by the (...)
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