Search results for 'Doctor Who' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kevin S. Decker (2013). Who is Who?: The Philosophy of Doctor Who. I.B. Tauris.score: 180.0
    This is the first in-depth philosophical investigation of Doctor Who in popular culture.
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  2. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Doctor Who and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy Now 89 (Mar/Apr):43-44.score: 156.0
    The good Doctor has a lot to say about philosophy.
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  3. Tim Jones (2012). Courtland Lewis and Paula Smithka, Eds. (2011) Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):276-280.score: 90.0
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  4. Giles Birchley (2013). Doctor? Who? Nurses, Patient's Best Interests and Treatment Withdrawal: When No Doctor is Available, Should Nurses Withdraw Treatment From Patients? Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):96-108.score: 90.0
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  5. Emanuel D. Pollack & S. H. Hutner (1978). Why Doctor Who? Bioscience 28 (2):81-81.score: 90.0
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  6. B. Molewijk & R. Ahlzen (2011). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 13: Should the School Doctor Contact the Mother of a 17-Year-Old Girl Who has Expressed Suicidal Thoughts? [REVIEW] Clinical Ethics 6 (1):5-10.score: 72.0
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  7. Fenella Rouse (1992). Mrs. Wanglie and “Doctor Knows Best” and Making Decisions for Those Who Cannot Decide for Themselves: Autonomy in Two Recent Cases. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (02):165-.score: 72.0
  8. Low Yin Yee Sharon (2011). 'Who is Responsible for This Patient?': A Case Study Analysis of Conflicting Interests Between Patient, Family and Doctor in a Singaporean Context. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):261-271.score: 72.0
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  9. George J. Annas (1978). Who to Call When the Doctor Is Sick. Hastings Center Report 8 (6):18-20.score: 72.0
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  10. Y. Y. S. Low (2011). Who is Responsible for This Patient?': A Case Study Analysis of Conflicting Interests Between Patient, Family and Doctor in a Singaporean Context. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):261 - 271.score: 72.0
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  11. Stacey Olster (1998). "Two People Who Didn't Argue, Even, Except Over the Use of the Subjunctive": Jean Harris, the Scarsdale Diet Doctor Murder, and Diana Trilling. Critical Inquiry 25 (1):77.score: 72.0
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  12. Dana Cojocaru, Sorin Cace & Cristina Gavrilovici (2013). Christian and Secular Dimensions of the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (34):37-56.score: 54.0
    Trust in the doctor-patient relationship is an indispensable structural element for the medical profession. The discourse concerning trust and its importance in the healthcare context, although quite old, elicits increasingly more interest in research, especially for empirical approaches. The importance of trust in the doctor and in the medical profession can be demonstrated by starting from the Christian meaning of illness and medicine ; generally, the patristic sources see medicine and physicians as God’s gifts. T he perception of (...)
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  13. Tom Sorell (2001). Citizen–Patient/Citizen–Doctor. Health Care Analysis 9 (1):25-39.score: 54.0
    In a welfare states, no typical user of health care services isonly a patient; and no typical provider of these services is simply a doctor, nurse or paramedic. Occupiers of these rolesalso have distinctive relations and responsibilities – as citizens– to medical services, responsibilities that are widely acknowledgedby those who live in welfare states. Outside welfare states, thisfusion of civic consciousness with involvement in health care isless pronounced or missing altogether. But the globalisation of avery comprehensive understanding of human (...)
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  14. Evans Mupela, Paul Mustarde & Huw Jones (2011). Telemedicine in Primary Health, The Virtual Doctor Project Zambia. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):9-.score: 42.0
    This paper is a commentary on a project application of telemedicine to alleviate primary health care problems in Lundazi district in the Eastern province of Zambia. The project dubbed 'The Virtual Doctor Project' will use hard body vehicles fitted with satellite communication devices and modern medical equipment to deliver primary health care services to some of the neediest areas of the country. The relevance and importance of the project lies in the fact that these areas are hard-to-reach due to (...)
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  15. F. E. Fox, G. J. Taylor, M. F. Harris, K. J. Rodham, J. Sutton, J. Scott & B. Robinson (2009). "It's Crucial They're Treated as Patients": Ethical Guidance and Empirical Evidence Regarding Treating Doctor-Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):7-11.score: 42.0
    Ethical guidance from the British Medical Association (BMA) about treating doctor–patients is compared and contrasted with evidence from a qualitative study of general practitioners (GPs) who have been patients. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 GPs who had experienced a significant illness. Their experiences were discussed and issues about both being and treating doctor–patients were revealed. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to evaluate the data. In this article data extracts are used to illustrate and discuss three key points (...)
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  16. Gordon Graham (1987). The Doctor, the Rich, and the Indigent. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (1):51-61.score: 42.0
    This essay explores the major conflict between doing the best for indigents requiring health care and not unfairly imposing burdens on those who pay for that care through cost-shifting. The author argues that there is in fact no dilemma or conflict of duties presented here, but only because the doctor's concern with justice in bearing the burden of health care requires a system within which different levels of health care are available and in which indigent care is provided in (...)
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  17. Annemarie Gethmann-Siefert (2003). Consultation Instead of Prescription?A Model for the Structure of the Doctor?Patient Relationship. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (1):1-27.score: 42.0
    Against the usual paternalism, this article develops the proposition to structure the interaction between the doctor and the patient as an inter-subjective consultation. This means that the "information" of the patient prior to treatment, when "informed consent" is secured, as well as the actual medical treatment would have to be turned into an interaction between two responsible individuals. The "irresponsibility" of this patient, which is supposed to result from his "uninformedness", as is often argued in favour of keeping to (...)
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  18. Ghassan Moubarak, Aurélie Guiot, Ygal Benhamou, Alexandra Benhamou & Sarah Hariri (2011). Facebook Activity of Residents and Fellows and its Impact on the Doctor–Patient Relationship. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):101-104.score: 42.0
    Aim Facebook is an increasingly popular online social networking site. The purpose of this study was to describe the Facebook activity of residents and fellows and their opinions regarding the impact of Facebook on the doctor–patient relationship. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was emailed to 405 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009. Results Of the 202 participants who returned the questionnaire (50%), 147 (73%) had a Facebook profile. Among responders, 138 (99%) displayed their real (...)
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  19. M. Nicolson (2010). Death and Doctor Hornbook by Robert Burns: A View From Medical History. Medical Humanities 36 (1):23-26.score: 42.0
    Robert Burns's poem, Death and Doctor Hornbook, 1785, tells of the drunken narrator's late night encounter with Death. The Grim Reaper is annoyed that ‘Dr Hornbook’, a local schoolteacher who has taken to selling medications and giving medical advice, is successfully thwarting his efforts to gather victims. The poet fears that the local gravedigger will be unemployed but Death reassures him that this will not be the case since Hornbook kills more than he cures. Previous commentators have regarded the (...)
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  20. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.score: 42.0
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
     
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  21. D. Cox (1996). Should a Doctor Prescribe Hormone Replacement Therapy Which has Been Manufactured From Mare's Urine? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):199-203.score: 42.0
    Many clinicians are experiencing consumer resistance to the prescription of equine HRT (that is hormone replacement therapy which has been manufactured from mare's urine). In this paper I consider the ethical implications of prescribing these preparations. I decide that patients should have a right to refuse such treatment but also ask whether a prescribing doctor should choose one preparation over another on moral grounds. I determine that there is prima facie evidence to suggest that mares may suffer and that (...)
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  22. M. Kottow (1983). Medical Ethics: Who Decides What? Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):105-108.score: 42.0
    The FME symposium on teaching medical ethics takes up the issue of competence and responsibility in matters concerning bioethics (1). Foreseeably, the medical participants argue that physicians are prepared, or can be easily prepared, to handle all relevant aspects of medical ethics. The contrary position is sustained by the philosophically trained participants, who believe that physicians do not, in fact cannot, sufficiently manage medico-ethical problems. This paper sees a role for both parties. Medical ethicists should properly be involved in medical (...)
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  23. Elena C. Strauman & Bethany C. Goodier (2011). The Doctor(s) in House: An Analysis of the Evolution of the Television Doctor-Hero. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):31-46.score: 42.0
    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the “television doctor” by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate (...)
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  24. Robert Klitzman (2006). "Post-Residency Disease" and the Medical Self: Identity, Work, and Health Care Among Doctors Who Become Patients. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (4):542-552.score: 36.0
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  25. Fredrick R. Abrams (2006). Doctors on the Edge: Will Your Doctor Break the Rules for You? Sentient Publications.score: 32.0
    A collection of dramatic accounts about doctors who have faced the moral dilemma of choosing between obeying rules and doing what is best for a patient offers insight into the essential principles of medical ethics and their impact on ...
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  26. Russell P. Gollard (1998). Physicians and Gumshoes: Prescription for Bad Medicine, or the Man Who Didn't Like Doctors. Journal of Medical Humanities 19 (1):25-38.score: 32.0
    Raymond Chandler, the creator of legendary detective Philip Marlowe and the recipient of increasing literary admiration over the past 40 years, used numerous physicians as minor characters in his novels and short stories. The presence of physicians as minor characters in Chandler's work, though unnoticed by previous critics, is illustrative both of the writer's personal antipathy towards medical doctors and larger societal forces which left medical charlatans free to open clinics. Chandler's own chronic health problems and those of his wife (...)
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  27. E. D. Ward (1986). Dialysis or Death? Doctors Should Stop Covering Up for an Inadequate Health Service. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):61-63.score: 32.0
    Doctors who entered the National Health Service to practice medicine now find themselves forced to practise selection. It seems that patients are being lost at GP level. Surely the basis of a good relationship between doctor and patient relies on trust and trust is based on truth which should not be concealed from patients. And should any one dare decide the quality of life for another human being?
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  28. David Shaw (2009). Cutting Through Red Tape: Non-Therapeutic Circumcision and Unethical Guidelines. Clinical Ethics 4 (4):181-186.score: 30.0
    Current General Medical Council guidelines state that any doctor who does not wish to carry out a non-therapeutic circumcision (NTC) on a boy must invoke conscientious objection. This paper argues that this is illogical, as it is clear that an ethical doctor will object to conducting a clinically unnecessary operation on a child who cannot consent simply because of the parents’ religious beliefs. Comparison of the GMC guidelines with the more sensible British Medical Association guidance reveals that both (...)
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  29. Josef Perner & Eva Rafetseder (2011). Is Reasoning From Counterfactual Antecedents Evidence for Counterfactual Reasoning? Thinking and Reasoning 16 (2):131-155.score: 30.0
    In most developmental studies the only error children could make on counterfactual tasks was to answer with the current state of affairs. It was concluded that children who did not show this error are able to reason counterfactually. However, children might have avoided this error by using basic conditional reasoning (Rafetseder, Cristi-Vargas, & Perner, 2010). Basic conditional reasoning takes background assumptions represented as conditionals about how the world works. If an antecedent of one of these conditionals is provided by the (...)
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  30. Richard T. De George (1982). The Moral Responsibility of the Hospital. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):87-100.score: 30.0
    The hospital has legal liability. Does it also have moral responsibility? Is it a moral agent, and if so in what sense? There are two issues involved, one conceptual and the other normative. The conceptual issue is whether a hospital can be morally responsible. If seen not only as a physical facility but as a formal organization, it can be said to act rationally, choose between alternatives, and affect human beings. It thus satisfies die criteria for moral responsibility, even though (...)
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  31. Lynley Anderson (2007). Doctoring Risk: Responding to Risk-Taking in Athletes. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):119 – 134.score: 30.0
    Athletes who wish to compete in spite of high risk of injury can prove a challenge for sports doctors. Overriding an athlete's choices could be considered to be unnecessarily overbearing or paternalistic. However simply accepting all risk-taking as the voluntary choice of an individual fails to acknowledge the context of high-level sport and the circumstances in which an athlete may be being coerced or in some other way be making a less than voluntary choice. Restricting the voluntary choices of an (...)
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  32. R. S. Downie (1982). Collective Responsibility in Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):43-56.score: 30.0
    There is a widespread assumption that responsibility in health care is vested in the last resort in the individual doctor who is caring for a given patient. In the first section of this article I shall try to bring out the plausibility of this assumption, and examine the concept of collective responsibility which it allows. In the second and third sections I shall try to show the fatal weaknesses of the assumption in its unmodified form, and shall argue that (...)
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  33. Deborah Hellman (2009). Willfully Blind for Good Reason. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (3):301-316.score: 30.0
    Willful blindness is not an appropriate substitute for knowledge in crimes that require a mens rea of knowledge because an actor who contrives his own ignorance is only sometimes as culpable as a knowing actor. This paper begins with the assumption that the classic willfully blind actor—the drug courier—is culpable. If so, any plausible account of willful blindness must provide criteria that find this actor culpable. This paper then offers two limiting cases: a criminal defense lawyer defending a client he (...)
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  34. Sarah Mann-O'Donnell (2010). From Hypochondria to Convalescence: Health as Chronic Critique in Nietzsche, Deleuze and Guattari. Deleuze Studies 4 (2):161-182.score: 30.0
    In 1886, Nietzsche wrote: ‘I am still waiting for a philosophical doctor in the extraordinary sense of the term’: a doctor who pursues not truth, but an exceptional kind of health. Nietzsche's will to health, his theory of drive organisation, and his insistence that the philosopher put himself at risk, all work together in his overall project, which consists of taking up the very role of the highly revalued physician for whom he is waiting. Deleuze and Guattari engage (...)
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  35. Roger S. Magnusson (2009). The Traditional Account of Ethics and Law at the End of Life—and its Discontents. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):307-324.score: 30.0
    For the past 30 years, the Melbourne urologist Dr Rodney Syme has quietly—and more recently, not-so-quietly—assisted terminally and permanently ill people to die. This paper draws on Syme’s recent book, A Good Death: An Argument for Voluntary Euthanasia , to identify and to reflect on some important challenges to what I outline as the traditional account of law, ethics, and end of life decisions. Among the challenges Syme makes to the traditional view is his argument that physicians’ intentions are frail (...)
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  36. Michael A. Schwartz, Deaf Patients, Doctors, and the Law: Compelling a Conversation About Communication.score: 30.0
    Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) grants people with disabilities access to public accommodations, including the offices of medical providers, equal to that enjoyed by persons without disabilities. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has unequivocally declared that the law requires effective communication between the medical provider and the Deaf patient. Because most medical providers are not fluent in sign language, the DOJ has recognized that effective communication calls for the use of appropriate auxiliary aids, including sign language (...)
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  37. Toni Brennan & Peter Hegarty (2009). Magnus Hirschfeld, His Biographies and the Possibilities and Boundaries of 'Biography' as 'Doing History'. History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):24-46.score: 30.0
    This article considers the two major biographies of sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld, MD (1868—1935), an early campaigner for ‘gay rights’ avant la lettre. Like him, his first biographer Charlotte Wolff (1897—1986) was a Jewish doctor who lived and worked in Weimar Republic Berlin and fled Germany when the Nazi regime came to power. When researching Hirschfeld’s biography (published in English in 1986) Wolff met a librarian and gay activist, Manfred Herzer, who would eventually be a cofounder of the Gay Museum (...)
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  38. S. H. Burges (1980). Doctors and Torture: The Police Surgeon. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):120-123.score: 30.0
    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of others. (...)
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  39. P. R. Ferguson (1997). Causing Death or Allowing to Die? Developments in the Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):368-372.score: 30.0
    Several cases which have been considered by the courts in recent years have highlighted the legal dilemmas facing doctors whose decisions result in the ending of a patient's life. This paper considers the case of Dr Cox, who was convicted of attempting to murder one of his patients, and explores the roles of motive, diminished responsibility and consent in cases of "mercy killing". The Cox decision is compared to that of Tony Bland and Janet Johnstone, in which the patients were (...)
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  40. R. W. Kessel (1992). Doctors Who Lie. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):49-49.score: 30.0
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  41. R. Stinson & P. Stinson (1981). On the Death of a Baby. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (1):5-18.score: 30.0
    Andrew was a desperately premature baby weighing under two pounds. He died after months of "heroic' efforts in an intensive care facility. The story of his short cruel institutionalised life is a case study in the limits and excesses of modern medicine. The night he told us our son Andrew was about to die the doctor who had taken charge of him six months before also told us we were "intellectually tight' that we had "no feelings only thoughts and (...)
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  42. Z. Versluys & R. de Leeuw (1995). A Dutch Report on the Ethics of Neonatal Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):14-18.score: 30.0
    The Dutch Paediatric Association reports consensus among its members regarding the necessity to take the future quality of life into account when reaching decisions regarding the continuation or dis-continuation of life-prolonging treatment. The paramount importance of the discussion with the parents is stressed. Dissension exists regarding active euthanasia in the newborn, both opinions being respected. If dissension exists within the profession parents should be informed and if necessary referred to a doctor who shares their moral views.
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  43. B. G. Haire (2013). Ethics of Medical Care and Clinical Research: A Qualitative Study of Principal Investigators in Biomedical HIV Prevention Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):231-235.score: 30.0
    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are (...)
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  44. R. Higgs (1982). Truth at the Last--A Case of Obstructed Death? Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):48-50.score: 30.0
    The following case breaks with tradition by having only one commentary upon it, and that is from the doctor who submitted the case. We invite readers to make their own analysis of his comments, and to respond as appropriate.
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  45. Els Maeckelberghe (2004). Feminist Ethic of Care: A Third Alternative Approach. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (4):317-327.score: 30.0
    A man with Alzheimer's who wanders around, a caregiver who disconnects the alarm, a daughter acting on het own, and a doctor who is not consulted set the stage for a feminist reflection on capacity/competence assessment. Feminist theory attempts to account for gender inequality in the political and in the epistemological realm. One of its tasks is to unravel the settings in which actual practices, i.c. capacity/competence assessment take place and offer an alternative. In this article the focus will (...)
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  46. Steven H. Miles (2014). Accountability for Doctors Who Torture. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):59-59.score: 30.0
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  47. Cristina Richie (2014). Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 30.0
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring specific discrepancies (...)
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  48. Vonn Christenson (2004). Courts Protect Ninth Circuit Doctors Who Recommend Medical Marijuana Use. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics: A Journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics 32 (1):174.score: 30.0
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  49. Włodzimierz Galewicz (2004). Pokusy i grzechy wiary pragmatycznej. Immanuel Kant o wewnętrznym kłamstwie. Roczniki Filozoficzne 52 (2):111-120.score: 30.0
    The paper an analytical-interpretative commentary on several excerpts from I. Kant. The first one with an example of a doctor who thinks he knows his patient's illness deals with the concept of pragmatic faith. The author seeks to explicate this concept by giving three interpretations of Kantian example. In a further part of the paper the internal lie is defined as a sin which may fall part of any "believers not careful enough" of the titular faith. The first example (...)
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  50. D. H. Irvine (1991). The Advertising of Doctors' Services. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (1):35-40.score: 30.0
    Medicine is unique among professions and trades, offering a 'product' which is unlike any other. The consequences for patients of being attracted by misleading information to an inappropriate doctor or service are such as to demand special restrictions on the advertising of doctors' services. Furthermore, health care in the UK is organised around the 'referral system', whereby general practitioners refer patients to specialists when necessary rather than have specialists accept patients on self-referral. But this need not inhibit the provision (...)
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