Search results for 'Dogs' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matteo E. Bonfanti (2014). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):791-807.score: 24.0
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer (...)
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  2. Sofia Jeppsson (2014). Purebred Dogs and Canine Wellbeing. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):417-430.score: 24.0
    Breeders of purebred dogs usually have several goals they want to accomplish, of which canine wellbeing is one. The purpose of this article is to investigate what we ought to do given this goal. Breeders typically think that they fulfil their wellbeing-related duties by doing the best they can within their breed of choice. However, it is true of most breeders that they could produce physically and mentally healthier dogs if they switched to a healthier breed. There are (...)
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  3. D. T. Graham (1944). Experimental Transfer of Conditioning in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (6):486.score: 21.0
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  4. W. N. Kellogg & I. S. Wolf (1940). 'Hypotheses' and 'Random Activity' During the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (6):588.score: 21.0
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  5. W. N. Kellogg, R. C. Davis & V. B. Scott (1939). Refinements in Technique for the Conditioning of Motor Reflexes in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (3):318.score: 21.0
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  6. Chris Pearson (2013). Dogs, History, and Agency. History and Theory 52 (4):128-145.score: 21.0
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  7. W. J. Brogden (1940). Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs Re-Established and Maintained with Change of Locus in the Application of the Unconditioned Stimulus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):583.score: 21.0
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  8. William J. Fielding (2008). Dogs: A Continuing and Common Neighborhood Nuisance of New Providence, The Bahamas. Society and Animals 16 (1):61-73.score: 21.0
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  9. W. J. Brogden (1942). Non-Alimentary Components in the Food-Reinforcement of Conditioned Forelimb-Flexion in Food-Satiated Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (4):326.score: 21.0
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  10. W. J. Brogden (1941). The Effect of Change in Time of Reinforcement in the Maintenance of Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):49.score: 21.0
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  11. W. N. Kellogg (1938). Evidence for Both Stimulus-Substitution and Original Anticipatory Responses in the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (2):186.score: 21.0
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  12. Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.score: 20.0
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter (...)
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  13. Zsófia Virányi Teresa Schmidjell, Friederike Range, Ludwig Huber (2012). Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 20.0
    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, whether dogs are totally reliant on the pointing gesture itself, or if their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler has repeatedly been questioned. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect and investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In (...)
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  14. Márta Gácsi, Sára Szakadát & Ádám Miklósi (2013). Assistance Dogs Provide a Useful Behavioural Model to Enrich Communicative Skills of Assistance Robots. Frontiers in Psychology 4:971.score: 20.0
    These studies are part of a project aiming to reveal relevant aspects of human-dog interactions, which could serve as a model to design successful human-robot interactions. Presently there are no successfully commercialised assistance robots, however, assistance dogs work efficiently as partners for persons with disabilities. In Study 1, we analysed the cooperation of 32 assistance dog-owner dyads performing a carrying task. We revealed typical behaviour sequences and also differences depending on the dyads’ experiences and on whether the owner was (...)
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  15. Rainer Wohlfarth, Bettina Mutschler, Andrea Beetz, Friederike Kreuser & Ulrike Korsten-Reck (2013). Dogs Motivate Obese Children for Physical Activity: Key Elements of a Motivational Theory of Animal-Assisted Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 20.0
    Background: There is empirical evidence that the presence of a companion animal can have a positive impact on performance. The available evidence can be viewed in terms of differing hypotheses that attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the positive effects. Little attention has been given to motivation as a potential mode of action with regards to human-animal interactions. First we give an overview of evidence that animals might promote motivation. Second we present a study to examine the effect of a (...)
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  16. Friederike Range & Zsófia Virányi (2013). Social Learning From Humans or Conspecifics: Differences and Similarities Between Wolves and Dogs. Frontiers in Psychology 4:868.score: 20.0
    Most domestication hypotheses propose that dogs have been selected for enhanced communication and interactions with humans, including learning socially from human demonstrators. However, to what extent these skills are newly derived and to what extent they originate from wolf-wolf interactions is unclear. In order to test for the possible origins of dog social cognition, we need to compare the interactions of wolves and dogs with humans and with conspecifics. Here, we tested identically raised and kept juvenile wolves and (...)
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  17. Andrew Aberdein (2008). Logic for Dogs. In Steven D. Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Dog. Open Court. 167-181.score: 19.0
    Imagine a dog tracing a scent to a crossroads, sniffing all but one of the exits, and then proceeding down the last without further examination. According to Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus argued that the dog effectively employs disjunctive syllogism, concluding that since the quarry left no trace on the other paths, it must have taken the last. The story has been retold many times, with at least four different morals: (1) dogs use logic, so they are as clever as humans; (...)
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  18. Alice Crary (2012). Dogs and Concepts. Philosophy 87 (02):215-237.score: 18.0
    This article is a contribution to discussions about the prospects for a viable conceptualism, i.e., a viable view that represents our modes of awareness as conceptual all the way down. The article challenges the assumption, made by friends as well as foes of conceptualism, that a conceptualist stance necessarily commits us to denying animals minds. Its main argument starts from the conceptualist doctrine defended in the writings of John McDowell. Although critics are wrong to represent McDowell as implying that animals (...)
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  19. Robert Sparrow (2002). The March of the Robot Dogs. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):305-318.score: 18.0
    Following the success of Sony Corporation’s “AIBO”, robot cats and dogs are multiplying rapidly. “Robot pets” employing sophisticated artificial intelligence and animatronic technologies are now being marketed as toys and companions by a number of large consumer electronics corporations. -/- It is often suggested in popular writing about these devices that they could play a worthwhile role in serving the needs of an increasingly aging and socially isolated population. Robot companions, shaped like familiar household pets, could comfort and entertain (...)
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  20. John Barry (2006). Straw Dogs, Blind Horses and Post‐Humanism: The Greening of Gray? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (2):243-262.score: 18.0
    (2006). Straw Dogs, Blind Horses and Post‐Humanism: The Greening of Gray? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, The Political Theory of John Gray, pp. 243-262.
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  21. I. Lowy (2003). On Guinea Pigs, Dogs and Men: Anaphylaxis and the Study of Biological Individuality, 1902-1939. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):399-423.score: 18.0
    In 1910, Charles Richet suggested that studying individual variations in anaphylactic responses might both open a way to experimental investigation of the biological basis of individuality and help unify the immunological and physiological approaches to biological phenomena. The very opposite would happen however. In the next two decades, physiologists and immunologists interested in anaphylaxis and allergy experienced more and more difficulties in communicating. This divergence between the physiopathological and immunological approaches derived from discrepancies between the experimental systems used by each (...)
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  22. John August (2012). Contempt of Court: Unofficial Voices From the Dogs Australian High Court Case 1981 [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 107 (107):20.score: 18.0
    August, John Review(s) of: Contempt of court: Unofficial voices from the dogs Australian high court case 1981, by Jean Ely, Dissenters Press, West Melbourne 2011 $29.95.
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  23. Karen W. Pryor (2001). Cultural Transmission of Behavior in Animals: How a Modern Training Technology Uses Spontaneous Social Imitation in Cetaceans and Facilitates Social Imitation in Horses and Dogs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):352-352.score: 18.0
    Social learning and imitation is central to culture in cetaceans. The training technology used with cetaceans facilitates reinforcing imitation of one dolphin's behavior by another; the same technology, now widely used by pet owners, can lead to imitative learning in such unlikely species as dogs and horses. A capacity for imitation, and thus for cultural learning, may exist in many species.
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  24. John Gray (2007). Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.score: 18.0
    The British bestseller Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer (...)
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  25. Colin Radford (1970). Hoping, Wishing, and Dogs. Inquiry 13 (1-4):100 – 103.score: 18.0
    Although dogs are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, they can hope, for a dog's behaviour can manifest not only a desire for something but varying degrees of expectation that it will get what it desires; but since they are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, nothing they do can indicate that they both desire something and yet are certain that they will not get it. So the suggestion that dogs entertain idle wishes is, apparently, vacuous, i.e. untestable, (...)
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  26. Philip Lieberman (1998). Speech Evolution: Let Barking Dogs Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):520-521.score: 18.0
    Many animals, including dogs, produce vocal signals in which their mouths open and close producing In contrast, the vocal signals of species other than humans are tied to emotional states. The Broca's-Wernicke's area model of the brain bases of language is wrong.
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  27. Richard Moore, Bettina Mueller, Juliane Kaminski & Michael Tomasello (forthcoming). Two-Year-Olds but Not Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris) Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze. Developmental Science.score: 18.0
    Infants can see someone pointing to one of two buckets and infer that the toy they are seeking is hidden inside. Great apes do not succeed in this task, but, surprisingly, domestic dogs do. However, whether children and dogs understand these communicative acts in the same way is not yet known. To test this possibility, an experimenter did not point, look, or extend any part of her body towards either bucket, but instead lifted and shook one via a (...)
     
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  28. Dorit Karla Haubenhofer & Sylvia Kirchengast (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.score: 17.0
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  29. Sylvia Kirchengast & Dorit Karla Haubenhofer (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.score: 17.0
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  30. Glen Mazis (2008). Our Embodied Friendship with Dogs. In Steven Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You about Your Dog. Open Court.score: 16.0
  31. B. Plant (2011). Welcoming Dogs: Levinas and 'the Animal' Question. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (1):49-71.score: 16.0
    According to Levinas, the history of western philosophy has routinely ‘assimilated every Other into the Same’. More concretely stated, philosophers have neglected the ethical significance of other human beings in their vulnerable, embodied singularity. What is striking about Levinas’ recasting of ethics as ‘first philosophy’ is his own relative disregard for non-human animals. In this article I will do two interrelated things: (1) situate Levinas’ (at least partial) exclusion of the non-human animal in the context of his markedly bleak conception (...)
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  32. Richard Smith (2011). On Dogs and Children: Judgements in the Realm of Meaning. Ethics and Education 6 (2):171-180.score: 16.0
    When we say that good parenting is an ethical and not a technical matter, what is the nature of the warrant we can give for identifying one way of parenting as good and another as bad? There is, of course, a general issue here about the giving of reasons in ethics. The issue may seem to arise with peculiar force in parenting since parenting casts our whole being into uncertainty: here, above all, it seems, we do not scrutinise our commitments (...)
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  33. George Monbiot (2003). Guard Dogs of Perception: The Corporate Takeover of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):49-57.score: 16.0
    The belief that science is “a driver of growth in the knowledge economy” has led in recent decades to increasing encouragement by government of the involvement of industry and of commerce in the sponsorship and direction of research in universities, and to the increasing influence of industrial representatives on advisory panels associated with the publicly funded scientific research councils. By extending the doctrine of commercial confidentiality into university laboratories, inconvenient findings have been suppressed, and both free endeavour and free speech (...)
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  34. David McFarland (2008). Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds. OUP Oxford.score: 16.0
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
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  35. Günther Rohdenburg (1985). Dogs, Bitches and Other Creatures. Journal of Semantics 4 (2):117-135.score: 16.0
    ABSTRACTIn an attempt to uphold a specific constraint on sentential ambiguity Kempson (1980) has proposed an elaborate framework for dealing with the semantic duality of items such as dog. Her analysis culminates in a duality principle relating the specific and the general interpretation of the terms in question. These proposals are shown to have a number of serious shortcomings. First, they do not allow for the fact that the two relevant interpretations may vary in strength, and that independently of each (...)
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  36. Thomas W. Polger (2006). A Place for Dogs and Trees? Psyche 12 (5):online.score: 15.0
    Rosenberg does not provide arguments for some crucial premises in his argument against physicalism. In particular, he gives no independent argument to show that physicalists must accept the entry-by-entailment thesis. The arguments provided establish weaker premises than those that are needed. As a consequence, Rosenberg.
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  37. John P. Burgess (2008). 3. Cats, Dogs, and so On. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 4--56.score: 15.0
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  38. Bjørn Hofmann, Jan Helge Solbakk & Søren Holm (2006). Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: The Role of Analogies in Bioethical Analysis and Argumentation Concerning New Technologies. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (5):397-413.score: 15.0
    New medical technologies provide us with new possibilities in health care and health care research. Depending on their degree of novelty, they may as well present us with a whole range of unforeseen normative challenges. Partly, this is due to a lack of appropriate norms to perceive and handle new technologies. This article investigates our ways of establishing such norms. We argue that in this respect analogies have at least two normative functions: they inform both our understanding and our conduct. (...)
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  39. Jan Papy (1999). Lipsius and His Dogs: Humanist Tradition, Iconography and Rubens's Four Philosophers. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 62:167-198.score: 15.0
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  40. Alice Crary (2012). Dogs and Concepts – ERRATUM. Philosophy 87 (03):471-.score: 15.0
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  41. David Berman (1982). Spinoza's Spiders, Schopenhauer's Dogs. Philosophical Studies 29:202-209.score: 15.0
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  42. D. H. M. Brooks (1987). Dogs and Slaves: Genetics, Exploitation and Morality. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 88:31 - 64.score: 15.0
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  43. J. A. Richmond (1979). Saara Lilja: Dogs in Ancient Greek Poetry. (Commentationes Humanarum Litterarum, 56.) Pp. 156. Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica, 1976. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):160-161.score: 15.0
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  44. Kyle Johnson, Few Dogs Eat Whiskas or Cats Alpo.score: 15.0
    One of the interests in the Gapping construction is the headache it causes for those trying to get constituency structure right. On the assumption that Gapping, like other processes of sentence grammar, respects constituency, it is very hard to deliver the right constituents in cases such as (1). (1) a. Some consider him honest and others consider him pleasant. b. The faculty brought scotch to the party and the students brought beer to the party. c. The girls occasionally ate peanuts (...)
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  45. Matthew Day (2007). Godless Savages and Superstitious Dogs: Charles Darwin, Imperial Ethnography, and the Problem of Human Uniqueness. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):49-70.score: 15.0
  46. George S. Matejka (2010). Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs and Wear Cows. Teaching Philosophy 33 (4):422-423.score: 15.0
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  47. A. V. Campbell (2009). Mad Dogs and (Arguably) Madder Scotsmen: Biomedical Ethics in an Asian Context. Clinical Ethics 4 (2):57-58.score: 15.0
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  48. Riin Magnus (2014). Training Guide Dogs of the Blind with the “Phantom Man” Method: Historic Background and Semiotic Footing. Semiotica 2014 (198):181-204.score: 15.0
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  49. Sophia Menache (1997). Dogs: God's Worst Enemies? Society and Animals 5 (1):23-44.score: 15.0
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  50. Richard G. Epstein (1999). How Hiring: Dogs and Humans Need Not Apply. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):227-236.score: 15.0
    This is a review of Hans Moravec''s book, Robot: Mere Machine to Transcendent Mind. This review raises three categories of questions relating to Moravec''s vision of the future. First, there are the ethical and social implications issues implicit in robotics research. Second, there are the soul issues, which especially relate to the prospect of the demoralization of human beings. Third, there is the issue as to whether a robot could ever be a sentient being.
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