Search results for 'Dogs' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William J. Fielding (2008). Dogs: A Continuing and Common Neighborhood Nuisance of New Providence, The Bahamas. Society and Animals 16 (1):61-73.
    In 1841, the first Dog License Act officially described dogs as a nuisance. From then on, observers have repeatedly noted that dogs were a nuisance and that their barking was probably their prime irritant . Three fatal dog attacks since 1991 have highlighted the extent to which dogs can be more than a nuisance . This study reports the findings from 496 interviews—collected from a convenience sample with a quota—to assess the importance of dogs as a (...)
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  2.  12
    Matteo E. Bonfanti (2014). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):791-807.
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer (...)
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  3.  10
    Enrique Hülsz Piccone (2015). Heraclitus, Plato, and the Philosophic Dogs. Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15 (15):105-115.
    The paper focuses on a neglected instance of the Platonic reception of Heraclitus in the Republic, trying to show that it’s likely that Plato’s passage makes an allusion to Heraclitus’ B97 and B85. The main claim is that Plato’s use of the image of dogs looks back to Heraclitus, which invites an exploration of the possibility that at least some elements of Plato’s kallipolis might derive from Heraclitus – particularly from some ethical and political fragments. A brief survey of (...)
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  4.  16
    Sofia Jeppsson (2014). Purebred Dogs and Canine Wellbeing. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):417-430.
    Breeders of purebred dogs usually have several goals they want to accomplish, of which canine wellbeing is one. The purpose of this article is to investigate what we ought to do given this goal. Breeders typically think that they fulfil their wellbeing-related duties by doing the best they can within their breed of choice. However, it is true of most breeders that they could produce physically and mentally healthier dogs if they switched to a healthier breed. There are (...)
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  5.  5
    Chris Pearson (2013). Dogs, History, and Agency. History and Theory 52 (4):128-145.
    Drawing on posthumanist theories from geography, anthropology, and science and technology studies , this article argues that agency is shared unevenly between humans and nonhumans. It proposes that conceptualizing animals as agents allows them to enter history as active beings rather than static objects. Agency has become a key concept within history, especially since the rise of the “new” social history. But many historians treat agency as a uniquely human attribute, arguing that animals lack the cognitive abilities, self-awareness, and intentionality (...)
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  6.  5
    D. T. Graham (1944). Experimental Transfer of Conditioning in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (6):486.
  7.  3
    W. N. Kellogg & I. S. Wolf (1940). 'Hypotheses' and 'Random Activity' During the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (6):588.
  8.  3
    W. N. Kellogg, R. C. Davis & V. B. Scott (1939). Refinements in Technique for the Conditioning of Motor Reflexes in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (3):318.
  9.  1
    W. J. Brogden (1941). The Effect of Change in Time of Reinforcement in the Maintenance of Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):49.
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  10.  2
    W. J. Brogden (1940). Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs Re-Established and Maintained with Change of Locus in the Application of the Unconditioned Stimulus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):583.
  11.  1
    W. N. Kellogg (1938). Evidence for Both Stimulus-Substitution and Original Anticipatory Responses in the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (2):186.
  12. W. J. Brogden (1942). Non-Alimentary Components in the Food-Reinforcement of Conditioned Forelimb-Flexion in Food-Satiated Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (4):326.
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  13.  11
    John Gray (2007). Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.
    The British bestseller Straw Dogs is an exciting, radical work of philosophy, which sets out to challenge our most cherished assumptions about what it means to be human. From Plato to Christianity, from the Enlightenment to Nietzsche and Marx, the Western tradition has been based on arrogant and erroneous beliefs about human beings and their place in the world. Philosophies such as liberalism and Marxism think of humankind as a species whose destiny is to transcend natural limits and conquer (...)
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  14. Sophia Menache (1998). Dogs and Human Beings: A Story of Friendship. Society and Animals 6 (1):67-86.
    The wide consensus in research with regard to the modernity of keeping companion animals lies behind the prevailing conclusions about attitudes toward the canine species in pre-modern societies. These were reviewed mainly from a utilitarian perspective. Characterized, in part, by the protective shelter of the extended household and, as such, free of the tensions affecting the nuclear family in industrial cities, pre-modern societies supposedly lacked in the emotional stress and indigence that condition or encourage dog keeping. A careful examination of (...)
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  15. Robert Sparrow (2002). The March of the Robot Dogs. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):305-318.
    Following the success of Sony Corporation’s “AIBO”, robot cats and dogs are multiplying rapidly. “Robot pets” employing sophisticated artificial intelligence and animatronic technologies are now being marketed as toys and companions by a number of large consumer electronics corporations. -/- It is often suggested in popular writing about these devices that they could play a worthwhile role in serving the needs of an increasingly aging and socially isolated population. Robot companions, shaped like familiar household pets, could comfort and entertain (...)
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  16. Maureen B. Adams (2000). Emily Brontë and Dogs: Transformation Within the Human-Dog Bond. Society and Animals 8 (2):167-181.
    This paper examines the bond between humans and dogs as demonstrated in the life and work of Emily Brontë . The nineteenth century author, publishing under the pseudonym, Ellis Bell, evinced, both in her personal and professional life, the complex range of emotions explicit in the human-dog bond: attachment and companionship to domination and abuse. In Wuthering Heights, Brontë portrays the dog as scapegoat, illustrating the dark side of the bond found in many cultures. Moreover, she writes with awareness (...)
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  17.  70
    Alice Crary (2012). Dogs and Concepts. Philosophy 87 (02):215-237.
    This article is a contribution to discussions about the prospects for a viable conceptualism, i.e., a viable view that represents our modes of awareness as conceptual all the way down. The article challenges the assumption, made by friends as well as foes of conceptualism, that a conceptualist stance necessarily commits us to denying animals minds. Its main argument starts from the conceptualist doctrine defended in the writings of John McDowell. Although critics are wrong to represent McDowell as implying that animals (...)
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  18.  2
    Richard Moore, Bettina Mueller, Juliane Kaminski & Michael Tomasello (2015). Two-Year-Olds but Not Domestic Dogs (Canis Familiaris) Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze. Developmental Science 18 (2):232-242.
    Infants can see someone pointing to one of two buckets and infer that the toy they are seeking is hidden inside. Great apes do not succeed in this task, but, surprisingly, domestic dogs do. However, whether children and dogs understand these communicative acts in the same way is not yet known. To test this possibility, an experimenter did not point, look, or extend any part of her body towards either bucket, but instead lifted and shook one via a (...)
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  19.  21
    John Barry (2006). Straw Dogs, Blind Horses and Post‐Humanism: The Greening of Gray? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (2):243-262.
    (2006). Straw Dogs, Blind Horses and Post‐Humanism: The Greening of Gray? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, The Political Theory of John Gray, pp. 243-262.
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  20.  6
    Sofia Jeppsson (2016). Flourishing Dogs: The Case for an Individualized Conception of Welfare and Its Implications. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (3):425-438.
    Martha Nussbaum argues that animals are entitled to a flourishing life according to the norm for their species. Nussbaum furthermore suggests that in the case of dogs, breed norms as well as species norms are relevant. Her theses capture both common intuitions among laypeople according to which there is something wrong with the breeding of “unnatural” animals, or animals that are too different from their wild ancestors, and the dog enthusiast’s belief that dogs departing from the norms for (...)
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  21.  14
    I. Lowy (2003). On Guinea Pigs, Dogs and Men: Anaphylaxis and the Study of Biological Individuality, 1902-1939. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):399-423.
    In 1910, Charles Richet suggested that studying individual variations in anaphylactic responses might both open a way to experimental investigation of the biological basis of individuality and help unify the immunological and physiological approaches to biological phenomena. The very opposite would happen however. In the next two decades, physiologists and immunologists interested in anaphylaxis and allergy experienced more and more difficulties in communicating. This divergence between the physiopathological and immunological approaches derived from discrepancies between the experimental systems used by each (...)
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  22.  17
    Sylvia Kirchengast & Dorit Karla Haubenhofer (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.
    The study investigated 13 dog handlers and 18 companion dogs working as teams in nonhuman animal-assisted service. The handlers described in questionnaires what emotions they chose to associate with their daily life and therapeutic work. They described their emotional condition before and after therapeutic sessions, giving analogous descriptions for their dogs. Handlers collected saliva samples from themselves and their dogs during 3 months of therapeutic work) to measure cortisol concentrations using an enzyme-immunoassay. Handlers chose different emotions from (...)
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  23.  8
    Janet McCracken (2014). Dogs and Birds in Plato. Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):446-461.
    Arguing for censorship of the poets in the Republic, Socrates draws most of his examples from Homer. These examples often depict soldiers facing death on the battlefield. Homer, in turn, often represents a soldier's death with the image of dogs and birds scavenging upon his body. Homer's representations of death, then, often include dogs or birds, and these images are found in the near background of Plato's Republic. How does Plato himself use these animal images? I discuss Plato's (...)
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  24.  13
    Robert W. Mitchell & Elizabeth Edmonson (1999). Functions of Repetitive Talk to Dogs During Play: Control, Conversation, or Planning? Society and Animals 7 (1):55-81.
    This study describes people's repetitive talk when playing with dogs and explores three hypotheses about that talk. Each of 23 people played with two dogs . Videorecorded participants spoke about 208 words per interaction. Of all words used, eight accounted for more than 50%. Phrases most frequently used and repeated were "come on" and "come here. " In decreasing order of frequency, sentences ranged from imperatives to attention-getting devices, declaratives about the dogs, and questions. Additional declaratives and (...)
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  25.  18
    Dorit Karla Haubenhofer & Sylvia Kirchengast (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.
    The study investigated 13 dog handlers and 18 companion dogs working as teams in nonhuman animal-assisted service. The handlers described in questionnaires what emotions they chose to associate with their daily life and therapeutic work. They described their emotional condition before and after therapeutic sessions, giving analogous descriptions for their dogs. Handlers collected saliva samples from themselves and their dogs during 3 months of therapeutic work) to measure cortisol concentrations using an enzyme-immunoassay. Handlers chose different emotions from (...)
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  26.  2
    Victor Forte (2016). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who dominated (...)
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  27.  37
    Andrew Aberdein (2008). Logic for Dogs. In Steven D. Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Dog. Open Court 167-181.
    Imagine a dog tracing a scent to a crossroads, sniffing all but one of the exits, and then proceeding down the last without further examination. According to Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus argued that the dog effectively employs disjunctive syllogism, concluding that since the quarry left no trace on the other paths, it must have taken the last. The story has been retold many times, with at least four different morals: (1) dogs use logic, so they are as clever as humans; (...)
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  28.  41
    Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter (...)
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  29.  6
    Robert W. Mitchell & Elizabeth Edmonson (1999). Functions of Repetitive Talk to Dogs During Play: Control, Conversation, or Planning? Society and Animals 7 (1):55-81.
    This study describes people's repetitive talk when playing with dogs and explores three hypotheses about that talk. Each of 23 people played with two dogs . Videorecorded participants spoke about 208 words per interaction. Of all words used, eight accounted for more than 50%. Phrases most frequently used and repeated were "come on" and "come here. " In decreasing order of frequency, sentences ranged from imperatives to attention-getting devices, declaratives about the dogs, and questions. Additional declaratives and (...)
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  30.  8
    Sophia Menache (1997). Dogs: God's Worst Enemies? Society and Animals 5 (1):23-44.
    In a broad survey of negative and hostile attitudes toward canines in pagan, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions, the author posits that warm ties between humans and canines have been seen as a threat to the authority of the clergy and indeed, of God. Exploring ancient myth, Biblical and Rabbinical literature, and early and medieval Christianity and Islam, she explores images and prohibitions concerning dogs in the texts of institutionalized, monotheistic religions, and offers possible explanations for these attitudes, including (...)
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  31.  7
    John August (2012). Contempt of Court: Unofficial Voices From the Dogs Australian High Court Case 1981 [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist 107 (107):20.
    August, John Review(s) of: Contempt of court: Unofficial voices from the dogs Australian high court case 1981, by Jean Ely, Dissenters Press, West Melbourne 2011 $29.95.
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  32.  3
    Heidi Wallace, Sara Staats, Debby Miller & Tara Anderson (2010). Perceived Best Ages for Cats, Dogs, and Humans: Comparisons Across Species, Human Age, and Human Gender. Society and Animals 18 (3):273-290.
    In addition to chronological age, humans perceive themselves and others as possessing several different functional ages. We extended the boundaries of research on perceived age concepts to cats and dogs, asking people to report on the best physical, mental, emotional, and social ages for cats and dogs. We found that emotional age was the oldest of the best ages and that physical best age was the youngest perceived best age for humans, cats, and dogs. Subjective age concepts (...)
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  33.  3
    Sara Staats, Tara Anderson, Heidi Wallace & Debby Miller (2010). Perceived Best Ages for Cats, Dogs, and Humans: Comparisons Across Species, Human Age, and Human Gender. Society and Animals 18 (3):273-290.
    In addition to chronological age, humans perceive themselves and others as possessing several different functional ages. We extended the boundaries of research on perceived age concepts to cats and dogs, asking people to report on the best physical, mental, emotional, and social ages for cats and dogs. We found that emotional age was the oldest of the best ages and that physical best age was the youngest perceived best age for humans, cats, and dogs. Subjective age concepts (...)
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  34.  9
    Colin Radford (1970). Hoping, Wishing, and Dogs. Inquiry 13 (1-4):100 – 103.
    Although dogs are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, they can hope, for a dog's behaviour can manifest not only a desire for something but varying degrees of expectation that it will get what it desires; but since they are almost totally incapable of symbolic behaviour, nothing they do can indicate that they both desire something and yet are certain that they will not get it. So the suggestion that dogs entertain idle wishes is, apparently, vacuous, i.e. untestable, (...)
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  35.  11
    Karen W. Pryor (2001). Cultural Transmission of Behavior in Animals: How a Modern Training Technology Uses Spontaneous Social Imitation in Cetaceans and Facilitates Social Imitation in Horses and Dogs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):352-352.
    Social learning and imitation is central to culture in cetaceans. The training technology used with cetaceans facilitates reinforcing imitation of one dolphin's behavior by another; the same technology, now widely used by pet owners, can lead to imitative learning in such unlikely species as dogs and horses. A capacity for imitation, and thus for cultural learning, may exist in many species.
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  36.  5
    Philip Lieberman (1998). Speech Evolution: Let Barking Dogs Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):520-521.
    Many animals, including dogs, produce vocal signals in which their mouths open and close producing In contrast, the vocal signals of species other than humans are tied to emotional states. The Broca's-Wernicke's area model of the brain bases of language is wrong.
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  37.  1
    K. Sutherland (2003). Straw Men and Diamond Dogs. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (2):86-94.
    John Gray, Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics and the author of the book under review should not be confused with the John Gray who thinks that men are from Mars and women from Venus. Our man is a political philosopher, best known for a string of books on liberalism and a lot less sanguine about the prospects for humanity than his New Age namesake. In fact, perhaps on account of his earlieRAffection for Margaret Thatcher, he (...)
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  38. Colin Dayan (2015). With Dogs at the Edge of Life. Cup.
    In this original and provocative book, Colin Dayan tackles head-on the inexhaustible world, at once tender and fierce, of dogs and humans. We follow the tracks of dogs in the bayous of Louisiana, the streets of Istanbul, and the humane societies of the United States, and in the memories and myths of the humans who love them. Dayan reorients our ethical and political assumptions through a trans-species engagement that risks as much as it promises. She makes a powerful (...)
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  39. Alberto Toscano (ed.) (2013). The Dogs of the Sinai. Seagull Books.
    A searing introduction to Franco Fortini, a Jewish communist and a major figure in postwar Italian intellectual life, _The Dogs of the Sinai_ is a book against—against those who love to rush to the aid of the victors, against the widespread and racist contempt for Arabs, and against the celebration of modern civilization and technology that Israel embodies. It is also the book in which Fortini sought to clarify for himself his conflicted identity as an Italian Jew. An uncomfortably (...)
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  40. Barbara Smuts (2002). Gestural Communication in Olive Baboons and Domestic Dogs. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 301--306.
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  41. Olga Solomon (2010). What a Dog Can Do: Children with Autism and Therapy Dogs in Social Interaction. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):143-166.
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  42. Neil Pemberton & Michael Worboys (2005). 'The Chief Constable of Clitheroe V M. Pasteur': Mad Dogs and Lancastrians C. 1890. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 87 (1):89-110.
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  43. Tami Harbolt & Tamara Ward (2001). Teaming Incarcerated Youth with Shelter Dogs For a Second Chance. Society and Animals 9 (2):177-182.
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  44.  15
    Brian Hare & Michael Tomasello (2005). Human-Like Social Skills in Dogs? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):439-444.
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  45. Thomas W. Polger (2006). A Place for Dogs and Trees? Psyche 12 (5).
    Rosenberg does not provide arguments for some crucial premises in his argument against physicalism. In particular, he gives no independent argument to show that physicalists must accept the entry-by-entailment thesis. The arguments provided establish weaker premises than those that are needed. As a consequence, Rosenberg.
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  46.  8
    Kerstin Fischer (2014). People Do Not Interact with Robots Like They Do with Dogs. Interaction Studies 15 (2):201-204.
  47.  10
    David McFarland (2008). Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds. OUP Oxford.
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
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  48. Jerry A. Fodor (1987). Modules, Frames, Fridgeons, Sleeping Dogs, and the Music of the Spheres. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex 139--49.
     
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  49.  33
    Bjørn Hofmann, Jan Helge Solbakk & Søren Holm (2006). Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: The Role of Analogies in Bioethical Analysis and Argumentation Concerning New Technologies. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (5):397-413.
    New medical technologies provide us with new possibilities in health care and health care research. Depending on their degree of novelty, they may as well present us with a whole range of unforeseen normative challenges. Partly, this is due to a lack of appropriate norms to perceive and handle new technologies. This article investigates our ways of establishing such norms. We argue that in this respect analogies have at least two normative functions: they inform both our understanding and our conduct. (...)
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  50.  31
    Tom Clark (1999). Keeping the Dogs of Determinism at Bay. The Philosophers' Magazine 6 (6):49-50.
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