Search results for 'Dogs' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kristien Hens (2009). Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry Into the Dog–Human Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):3-14.score: 8.0
    The conditions of life of many companion animals and the rate at which they are surrendered to shelters raise many ethical issues. What duties do we have towards the dogs that live in our society? To suggest answers to these questions, I first give four possible ways of looking at the relationship between man and dog: master–slave, employer–worker, parent–child, and friend–friend. I argue that the morally acceptable relationships are of a different kind but bears family resemblances to the latter (...)
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  2. Matteo E. Bonfanti (2014). From Sniffer Dogs to Emerging Sniffer Devices for Airport Security: An Opportunity to Rethink Privacy Implications? Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):791-807.score: 8.0
    Dogs are known for their incredible ability to detect odours, extracting them from a “complex” environment and recognising them. This makes sniffer dogs precious assets in a broad variety of security applications. However, their use is subject to some intrinsic restrictions. Dogs can only be trained to a limited set of applications, get tired after a relatively short period, and thus require a high turnover. This has sparked a drive over the past decade to develop artificial sniffer (...)
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  3. Riin Magnus (2014). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 8.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam contact; (...)
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  4. Sofia Jeppsson (2014). Purebred Dogs and Canine Wellbeing. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):417-430.score: 8.0
    Breeders of purebred dogs usually have several goals they want to accomplish, of which canine wellbeing is one. The purpose of this article is to investigate what we ought to do given this goal. Breeders typically think that they fulfil their wellbeing-related duties by doing the best they can within their breed of choice. However, it is true of most breeders that they could produce physically and mentally healthier dogs if they switched to a healthier breed. There are (...)
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  5. Zsófia Virányi Teresa Schmidjell, Friederike Range, Ludwig Huber (2012). Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 8.0
    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, whether dogs are totally reliant on the pointing gesture itself, or if their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler has repeatedly been questioned. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect and investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In (...)
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  6. Andrea Beetz, Henri Julius, Dennis Turner & Kurt Kotrschal (2012). Effects of Social Support by a Dog on Stress Modulation in Male Children with Insecure Attachment. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 8.0
    Up to 90% of children with special education needs and about 40% of children in the general population show insecure or disorganized attachment patterns, which are linked to a diminished ability to use social support by others for the regulation of stress. The aim of the study was to investigate if children with insecure-avoidant/disorganized attachment can profit more from social support by a dog compared to a friendly human during a stressful task. We investigated 47 male children (age 7-11) with (...)
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  7. Márta Gácsi, Sára Szakadát & Ádám Miklósi (2013). Assistance Dogs Provide a Useful Behavioural Model to Enrich Communicative Skills of Assistance Robots. Frontiers in Psychology 4:971.score: 8.0
    These studies are part of a project aiming to reveal relevant aspects of human-dog interactions, which could serve as a model to design successful human-robot interactions. Presently there are no successfully commercialised assistance robots, however, assistance dogs work efficiently as partners for persons with disabilities. In Study 1, we analysed the cooperation of 32 assistance dog-owner dyads performing a carrying task. We revealed typical behaviour sequences and also differences depending on the dyads’ experiences and on whether the owner was (...)
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  8. Rainer Wohlfarth, Bettina Mutschler, Andrea Beetz, Friederike Kreuser & Ulrike Korsten-Reck (2013). Dogs Motivate Obese Children for Physical Activity: Key Elements of a Motivational Theory of Animal-Assisted Interventions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 8.0
    Background: There is empirical evidence that the presence of a companion animal can have a positive impact on performance. The available evidence can be viewed in terms of differing hypotheses that attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the positive effects. Little attention has been given to motivation as a potential mode of action with regards to human-animal interactions. First we give an overview of evidence that animals might promote motivation. Second we present a study to examine the effect of a (...)
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  9. Friederike Range & Zsófia Virányi (2013). Social Learning From Humans or Conspecifics: Differences and Similarities Between Wolves and Dogs. Frontiers in Psychology 4:868.score: 8.0
    Most domestication hypotheses propose that dogs have been selected for enhanced communication and interactions with humans, including learning socially from human demonstrators. However, to what extent these skills are newly derived and to what extent they originate from wolf-wolf interactions is unclear. In order to test for the possible origins of dog social cognition, we need to compare the interactions of wolves and dogs with humans and with conspecifics. Here, we tested identically raised and kept juvenile wolves and (...)
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  10. Andrew Aberdein (2008). Logic for Dogs. In Steven D. Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Dog. Open Court. 167-181.score: 7.0
    Imagine a dog tracing a scent to a crossroads, sniffing all but one of the exits, and then proceeding down the last without further examination. According to Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus argued that the dog effectively employs disjunctive syllogism, concluding that since the quarry left no trace on the other paths, it must have taken the last. The story has been retold many times, with at least four different morals: (1) dogs use logic, so they are as clever as humans; (...)
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  11. Gail Kuhl (2011). Human-Sled Dog Relations: What Can We Learn From the Stories and Experiences of Mushers? Society and Animals 19 (1):22-37.score: 7.0
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  12. Lucinda Woodward, Jennifer Milliken & Sonya Humy (2012). Give a Dog a Bad Name and Hang Him: Evaluating Big, Black Dog Syndrome. Society and Animals 20 (3):236-253.score: 7.0
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  13. Philip Howell (2013). The Dog Fancy at War: Breeds, Breeding, and Britishness, 1914-1918. Society and Animals 21 (6):546-567.score: 7.0
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  14. Robert W. Mitchell & Alan L. Ellis (2013). Cat Person, Dog Person, Gay, or Heterosexual: The Effect of Labels on a Man's Perceived Masculinity, Femininity, and Likability. Society and Animals 21 (1):1-16.score: 7.0
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  15. Patrick Jackson (2012). Situated Activities in a Dog Park: Identity and Conflict in Human-Animal Space. Society and Animals 20 (3):254-272.score: 7.0
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  16. W. N. Kellogg, James Deese, N. H. Pronko & M. Feinberg (1947). An Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):99.score: 7.0
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  17. W. N. Kellogg & I. S. Wolf (1940). 'Hypotheses' and 'Random Activity' During the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (6):588.score: 7.0
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  18. W. N. Kellogg, R. C. Davis & V. B. Scott (1939). Refinements in Technique for the Conditioning of Motor Reflexes in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (3):318.score: 7.0
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  19. Chris Pearson (2013). Dogs, History, and Agency. History and Theory 52 (4):128-145.score: 7.0
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  20. Stephen D. Short, Jeffrey A. Gibbons & Sherman A. Lee (2010). Sympathetic Reactions to the Bait Dog in a Film of Dog Fighting: The Influence of Personality and Gender. Society and Animals 18 (2):107-125.score: 7.0
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  21. W. J. Brogden (1940). Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs Re-Established and Maintained with Change of Locus in the Application of the Unconditioned Stimulus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):583.score: 7.0
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  22. William J. Fielding (2008). Dogs: A Continuing and Common Neighborhood Nuisance of New Providence, The Bahamas. Society and Animals 16 (1):61-73.score: 7.0
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  23. D. T. Graham (1944). Experimental Transfer of Conditioning in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (6):486.score: 7.0
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  24. Dorit Karla Haubenhofer & Sylvia Kirchengast (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.score: 7.0
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  25. Sonya Humy, Jennifer Milliken & Lucinda Woodward (2012). Give a Dog a Bad Name and Hang Him: Evaluating Big, Black Dog Syndrome. Society and Animals 20 (3):236-253.score: 7.0
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  26. W. N. Kellog, J. Deese & N. H. Pronko (1946). On the Behavior of the Lumbo-Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (6):503.score: 7.0
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  27. Timothy A. Pychyl & Nikolina M. Duvall Antonacopoulos (2010). The Possible Role of Companion-Animal Anthropomorphism and Social Support in the Physical and Psychological Health of Dog Guardians. Society and Animals 18 (4):379-395.score: 7.0
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  28. P. S. Shurrager (1947). A Comment on 'an Attempt to Condition the Chronic Spinal Dog.'. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (3):261-263.score: 7.0
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  29. K. G. Wing & K. U. Smith (1942). The Role of the Optic Cortex in the Dog in the Determination of the Functional Properties of Conditioned Reactions to Light. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (6):478.score: 7.0
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  30. J. B. Beebe-Center & S. S. Stevens (1938). The Emotional Responses: Changes of Heart-Rate in a Gun-Shy Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (3):239.score: 7.0
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  31. I. A. Berg (1944). Development of Behavior: The Micturition Pattern in the Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (5):343.score: 7.0
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  32. W. J. Brogden (1942). Non-Alimentary Components in the Food-Reinforcement of Conditioned Forelimb-Flexion in Food-Satiated Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (4):326.score: 7.0
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  33. W. J. Brogden (1941). The Effect of Change in Time of Reinforcement in the Maintenance of Conditioned Flexion Responses in Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (1):49.score: 7.0
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  34. Travis Conner, Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen & Rajecki (2007). Punish and Forgive: Causal Attribution and Positivity Bias in Response to Cat and Dog Misbehavior. Society and Animals 15 (4):311-328.score: 7.0
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  35. William J. Fielding (2010). Domestic Violence and Dog Care in New Providence, The Bahamas. Society and Animals 18 (2):183-203.score: 7.0
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  36. Tomáš Jakuba, Zuzana Polcová, Denisa Fedáková, Jana Kottferová, Jana Mareková, Magdaléna Fejsáková, Olga Ondrašovičová & Miloslav Ondrašovič (2013). Differences in Evaluation of a Dog's Temperament by Individual Members of the Same Household. Society and Animals 21 (6):582-589.score: 7.0
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  37. W. N. Kellogg (1938). Evidence for Both Stimulus-Substitution and Original Anticipatory Responses in the Conditioning of Dogs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (2):186.score: 7.0
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  38. Sylvia Kirchengast & Dorit Karla Haubenhofer (2007). 'Dog Handlers' and Dogs' Emotional and Cortisol Secretion Responses Associated with Animal-Aassisted Therapy Sessions. Society and Animals 15 (2):127-150.score: 7.0
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  39. Sherman A. Lee, Jeffrey A. Gibbons & Stephen D. Short (2010). Sympathetic Reactions to the Bait Dog in a Film of Dog Fighting: The Influence of Personality and Gender. Society and Animals 18 (2):107-125.score: 7.0
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  40. D. W. Rajecki, Jeffrey Lee Rasmussen & Travis J. Conner (2007). Punish and Forgive: Causal Attribution and Positivity Bias in Response to Cat and Dog Misbehavior. Society and Animals 15 (4):311-328.score: 7.0
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  41. P. S. Shurrager & E. Culler (1941). Conditioned Extinction of a Reflex in the Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (4):287.score: 7.0
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  42. P. S. Shurrager & E. Culler (1940). Conditioning in the Spinal Dog. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):133.score: 7.0
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  43. Aaron Skabelund (2008). Breeding Racism: The Imperial Battlefields of the “German” Shepherd Dog. Society and Animals 16 (4):354-371.score: 7.0
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  44. Cathryn Bailey (2009). A Man and a Dog in a Lifeboat: Self-Sacrifice, Animals, and the Limits of Ethical Theory. Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 129-148.score: 6.0
    In discussions of animal ethics, hypothetical scenarios are often used to try to force the clarification of intuitions about the relative value of human and animal life. Tom Regan requests, for example, that we imagine a man and a dog adrift in a lifeboat while Peter Singer explains why the life of one's child ought to be preferred to that of the family dog in the event of a house fire. I argue that such scenarios are not the usefully abstract (...)
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  45. Susanna Siegel, The Dog and the Zombie.score: 6.0
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  46. Alice Crary (2012). Dogs and Concepts. Philosophy 87 (02):215-237.score: 6.0
    This article is a contribution to discussions about the prospects for a viable conceptualism, i.e., a viable view that represents our modes of awareness as conceptual all the way down. The article challenges the assumption, made by friends as well as foes of conceptualism, that a conceptualist stance necessarily commits us to denying animals minds. Its main argument starts from the conceptualist doctrine defended in the writings of John McDowell. Although critics are wrong to represent McDowell as implying that animals (...)
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  47. Robert Sparrow (2002). The March of the Robot Dogs. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):305-318.score: 6.0
    Following the success of Sony Corporation’s “AIBO”, robot cats and dogs are multiplying rapidly. “Robot pets” employing sophisticated artificial intelligence and animatronic technologies are now being marketed as toys and companions by a number of large consumer electronics corporations. -/- It is often suggested in popular writing about these devices that they could play a worthwhile role in serving the needs of an increasingly aging and socially isolated population. Robot companions, shaped like familiar household pets, could comfort and entertain (...)
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  48. Michael Rescorla (2009). Chrysippus' Dog as a Case Study in Non-Linguistic Cognition. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 52--71.score: 6.0
    I critique an ancient argument for the possibility of non-linguistic deductive inference. The argument, attributed to Chrysippus, describes a dog whose behavior supposedly reflects disjunctive syllogistic reasoning. Drawing on contemporary robotics, I urge that we can equally well explain the dog's behavior by citing probabilistic reasoning over cognitive maps. I then critique various experimentally-based arguments from scientific psychology that echo Chrysippus's anecdotal presentation.
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  49. Glen Mazis (2008). Our Embodied Friendship with Dogs. In Steven Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You about Your Dog. Open Court.score: 6.0
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