Search results for 'Dolores Wright' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. M. E. Moravcsik, G. P. Henderson, R. G. Swinburne, J. Gosling, C. C. W. Taylor, Martin Kramer, Arthur Thomson & Dolores Wright (1964). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 73 (289):142-154.
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  2. Frank Lloyd Wright & Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer (1992). Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings Including an Autobiography.
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  3. Frank Lloyd Wright, Frederick Albert Gutheim & Andrew Devane (1987). In the Cause of Architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright Essays.
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  4.  35
    Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.) (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press.
    This volume is a collective exploration of major themes in the work of Crispin Wright, one of today's leading philosophers. These newly commissioned papers are divided into four sections, preceded by a substantial Introduction, which places them in the context of the development of Wright's ideas. The distinguished contributors address issues such as the rule-following problem, knowledge of our meanings and minds, truth, realism, anti-realism and relativism, as well as the nature of perceptual justification, the cogency of arguments (...)
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  5.  5
    Crispin Wright (1982). Anti-Realist Semantics: The Role of Criteria: Crispin Wright. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:225-248.
    §I. Anti-realism of the sort which Michael Dummett has expounded takes issue with the traditional idea that an understanding of any statement is philosophically correctly analysed as involving grasp of conditions necessary and sufficient for its truth. Many kinds of statement to which, as we ordinarily think, we attach a clear sense would have to be represented, according to this tradition, as possessing verification-transcendent truth-conditions; if true that is to say, they would be so in virtue of circumstances of a (...)
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  6.  5
    Crispin Wright (1998). Self-Knowledge: The Wittgensteinian Legacy: Crispin Wright. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:101-122.
    It is only in fairly recent philosophy that psychological self-knowledge has come to be seen as problematical; once upon a time the hardest philosophical difficulties all seemed to attend our knowledge of others. But as philosophers have canvassed various models of the mental that would make knowledge of other minds less intractable, so it has become unobvious how to accommodate what once seemed evident and straightforward–the wide and seemingly immediate cognitive dominion of minds over themselves.
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    Clare Wright (2012). Utopia Girls: A Conversation with Clare Wright. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 20 (3):6.
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  8.  8
    H. W. Wright (1930). Book Review:General Introduction to Ethics. William Kelley Wright. [REVIEW] Ethics 40 (3):443-.
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  9. Edmond L. Wright (1977). Words and Intentions: Edmond L. Wright. Philosophy 52 (199):45-62.
    The relationship of word-meaning to speaker's-meaning has not been examined thoroughly enough. Some philosophical problems are solved and others made plainer if the full consequences of a proper relationship between these two is worked out.
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  10. Philip Green Wright & Elizabeth Q. Wright (1937). Elizur Wright, the Father of Life Insurance. Science and Society 1 (3):443-444.
     
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  11. Von Wright (1987). Georg Henrik von Wright: Truth-Logics. Logique Et Analyse 30.
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  12. Von Wright (1986). Georg Henrik von Wright: Rationality: Means and End. Epistemologia 9.
     
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  13. Von Wright (1991). Georg Henrik von Wright: Is There a Logic of Norms. Ratio Juris 4.
     
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  14. W. K. Wright (1929). General Introduction to Ethics. By H. W. Wright. [REVIEW] Ethics 40:443.
     
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  15. Von Wright (1989). MEGGLE (1989). Georg Henrik von Wright und Georg Meggle: Das Verstehen von Handlungen (Münsteraner Disputation). Rechtstheorie 20.
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  16. C. Macdonald, Barry C. Smith & C. J. G. Wright (1998). Knowing Our Own Minds: Essays in Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    Self-knowledge is the focus of considerable attention from philosophers: Knowing Our Own Minds gives a much-needed overview of current work on the subject, bringing together new essays by leading figures. Knowledge of one's own sensations, desires, intentions, thoughts, beliefs, and other attitudes is characteristically different from other kinds of knowledge: it has greater immediacy, authority, and salience. The contributors examine philosophical questions raised by the distinctive character of self-knowledge, relating it to knowledge of other minds, to rationality and agency, externalist (...)
     
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  17.  51
    C. J. G. Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.) (2000). Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press.
  18. Frank Lloyd Wright (1987). Modern Architecture Being the Kahn Lectures for 1930.
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  19.  39
    Crispin Wright (ed.) (2001). Rails to Infinity. Harvard University Press.
    This volume, published on the fiftieth anniversary of Wittgenstein's death, brings together thirteen of Crispin Wright's most influential essays on Wittgenstein ...
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  20. Crispin Wright (2007). The Perils of Dogmatism. In Nuccetelli & Seay (eds.), Themes from G. E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology. Oxford University Press
    "Dogmatism" is a term renovated by James Pryor [2000] to stand for a certain kind of neo-Moorean response to Scepticism and an associated conception of the architecture of basic perceptual warrant. Pryor runs the response only for (some kinds of) perceptual knowledge but here I will be concerned with its general structure and potential as a possible global anti-sceptical strategy. Something like it is arguably also present in recent writings of Burge 1 and Peacocke.2 If the global strategy could succeed, (...)
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  21.  29
    Crispin Wright (2012). Replies. In Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.), Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press 201-219.
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  22. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2003). Reason's Proper Study: Essays Towards a Neo-Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Bob Hale and Crispin Wright draw together here the key writings in which they have worked out their distinctive neo-Fregean approach to the philosophy of mathematics. The two main components in Frege's mathematical philosophy were his platonism and his logicism -- the claims, respectively, that mathematics is a body of knowledge about independently existing objects, and that this knowledge may be acquired on the basis of general logical laws and suitable definitions. The central thesis of this collection is that (...)
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  23. Crispin Wright & Martin Davies (2004). On Epistemic Entitlement. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78:167-245.
    [Crispin Wright] Two kinds of epistemological sceptical paradox are reviewed and a shared assumption, that warrant to accept a proposition has to be the same thing as having evidence for its truth, is noted. 'Entitlement', as used here, denotes a kind of rational warrant that counter-exemplifies that identification. The paper pursues the thought that there are various kinds of entitlement and explores the possibility that the sceptical paradoxes might receive a uniform solution if entitlement can be made to reach (...)
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  24. Crispin Wright (2012). The Pain of Rejection, the Sweetness of Revenge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 160 (3):465-476.
    The pain of rejection, the sweetness of revenge Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-12 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9794-2 Authors Crispin Wright, Department of Philosophy, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  25.  29
    Sarah Wright (2012). How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics. Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism about (...)
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  26.  2
    Ken Wright (2015). Born Bad: Original Sin and the Making of the Western World [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 117:22.
    Wright, Ken Review of: Born bad: Original sin and the making of the western world, by James Boyce, Black Inc., Collingwood, Vic., 2014, pp. 260, $34.99.
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  27.  15
    Ken Wright (2012). What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist 108 (108):21.
    Wright, Ken Review(s) of: What money can't buy: The moral limits of markets, by Michael J. Sandel, Allen Lane, London, 20012, 244 pp., hardback $24.90.
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  28.  4
    George Wright (2004). Authority and Theodicy in Hobbes's Leviathan. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1.
    Authority and Theodicy in Hobbes's Leviathan - ABSTRACT: George Wright traces a conceptual link between Hobbes’s teaching on authority, both human and divine, and on theodicy, the justification of the wayes of God to men, as Milton had it. The key distinction between human and divine authority is captured in the differing positions of the slave and the hired man, as these were known in antiquity. The author then links authority to theodicy by way of the distinction that Hobbes (...)
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  29.  5
    George Wright (2002). Curley and Martinich in Dubious Battle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (4):461-476.
    George Wright - Curley and Martinich in Dubious Battle - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.4 461-476 Curley and Martinich in Dubious Battle George Wright the division of opinion as to the place of religion in the thought of Thomas Hobbes figures today as perhaps the key facet of a general rift in understanding the philosopher's thought and work. A recent conference at University College, London, confirms this observation, but readers (...)
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  30.  10
    Ken Wright (2012). A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionised the Cosmos [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist (106):20.
    Wright, Ken Review(s) of: A more perfect heaven: How copernicus revolutionised the cosmos, by Dava Sobel, Bloomsbury, London, 2011; 274 pp.; hardback $35.00.
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  31.  10
    Ken Wright (2012). Universe From Nothing: Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist 107 (107):21.
    Wright, Ken Review(s) of: Universe from nothing: Why there is something rather than nothing, by Lawrence M. Krauss, Free Press, New York 2012; xix + 202 pp.; hardback, $29.99.
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  32.  3
    Ken Wright (2014). Humanism for Inquiring Minds [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 113:20.
    Wright, Ken Review of: Humanism for inquiring minds, by Barbara Smoker, Conway Hall Ethical Society, London, 6th ed., 2013, 80 pp. 6.50 pounds.
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  33.  4
    Ken Wright (2013). Freethinkers Oppose the Teaching of Secular Ethics in Schools. The Australian Humanist 111 (111):12.
    Wright, Ken France's state school system has a long tradition of freedom from religion. It owes a great debt to Jules Ferry who was Minister for Public Instruction from 1879 to 1885, and to Ferdinand Buisson, his Director of Primary Education. A law of 28 March 1882 removed the teaching of religion from all primary schools, to be replaced by ethics and civics.
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  34.  4
    Ken Wright (2013). How Much is Enough?: Money and the Good Life [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist 110 (110):22.
    Wright, Ken Review of: How much is Enough?: Money and the good life, by Robert and Edward Skidelsky, Other Press, New York, 2012, x + 241 pp., $20.07.
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  35.  1
    Ken Wright (2015). Hope [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 116:22.
    Wright, Ken Review of: Hope, by Stan Van Hooft, Acumen Publishing, Durham, 2011, pp. viii + 152.
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  36.  5
    Ken Wright (2012). Blind Spots [Book Review]. The Australian Humanist (105):17.
    Wright, Ken Review(s) of: Blind spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right And What to Do about It, by Max H. Bazerman and Ann E. Tenbrunsel Princeton University Press 2011, x, 191pp.
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  37.  11
    A. Sloman, L. Beaudouin & I. Wright, Computational Modelling of Motive-Management Processes.
    This is a 5 page summary with three diagrams of the main objectives and some work in progress at the University of Birmingham Cognition and Affect project. involving: Professor Glyn Humphreys (School of Psychology), and Luc Beaudoin, Chris Paterson, Tim Read, Edmund Shing, Ian Wright, Ahmed El-Shafei, and (from October 1994) Chris Complin (research students). The project is concerned with "global" design requirements for coping simultaneously with coexisting but possibly unrelated goals, desires, preferences, intentions, and other kinds of motivators, (...)
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  38.  1
    Ken Wright (2014). Taking God to School: The End of Australia's Egalitarian Education? [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 115:21.
    Wright, Ken Review of: Taking god to school: The end of Australia's egalitarian education?, by Marion Maddox, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 2014, pp. xxiii + 248, $29.99.
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  39. Alexander Miller & Crispin Wright (2002). Rule-Following and Meaning. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, and José Zalabardo. This debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading of the rule-following (...)
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  40. Alexander Miller, Crispin Wright & Aleander Miller (2002). Rule-Following and Meaning. Routledge.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, Crispin Wright, and Jose Zalabardo. The debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading (...)
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  41. Alexander Miller & Crispin Wright (2014). Rule-Following and Meaning. Routledge.
    The rule-following debate, in its concern with the metaphysics and epistemology of linguistic meaning and mental content, goes to the heart of the most fundamental questions of contemporary philosophy of mind and language. This volume gathers together the most important contributions to the topic, including papers by Simon Blackburn, Paul Boghossian, Graeme Forbes, Warren Goldfarb, Paul Horwich, John McDowell, Colin McGinn, Ruth Millikan, Philip Pettit, George Wilson, Crispin Wright, and Jose Zalabardo. The debate has centred on Saul Kripke's reading (...)
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  42.  41
    M. R. Wright (1995). Cosmology in Antiquity. Routledge.
    Two and a half thousand years ago Greek philosophers "looked up at the sky and formed a theory of everything." Though their solutions are little credited today, the questions remain fresh. Early Greek thinkers struggled to come to terms with and explain the totality of their surroundings, to identitify an original substance from which the universe was compounded, and to reconcile the presence of balance and proportion with the apparent disorder of the cosmos. M. R. Wright examines cosmological (...)
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  43. William A. Wright (2015). Calvin's Salvation in Writing:: A Confessional Academic Theology. Brill.
    In Salvation in Writing , William Wright derives from Calvin’s theology of justification and sanctification a dialectical logic for writing truth that both rivals and mends those of Hegel and Derrida. The result represents a new program for academic theology.
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  44.  10
    Robert W. Wright (1991). Economics, Enlightenment, and Canadian Nationalism. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Rejecting the orthodox economic model as an inappropriate representation of social reality, Robert Wright proposes an alternative adapted from Foucault's ...
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  45. John Wright (2014). Explaining Science's Success: Understanding How Scientific Knowledge Works. Routledge.
    Paul Feyeraband famously asked, what's so great about science? One answer is that it has been surprisingly successful in getting things right about the natural world, more successful than non-scientific or pre-scientific systems, religion or philosophy. Science has been able to formulate theories that have successfully predicted novel observations. It has produced theories about parts of reality that were not observable or accessible at the time those theories were first advanced, but the claims about those inaccessible areas have since turned (...)
     
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  46. John P. Wright (2010). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
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  47. John P. Wright (2012). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
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  48. John P. Wright (2009). Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
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  49. Kenneth Wright (2009). Mirroring and Attunement: Self-Realization in Psychoanalysis and Art. Routledge.
    _Mirroring and Attunement_ offers a new approach to psychoanalysis, artistic creation and religion. Viewing these activities from a broadly relational perspective, Wright proposes that each provides a medium for creative dialogue: the artist discovers himself within his self-created forms, the religious person through an internal dialogue with ‘God’, and the analysand through the inter-subjective medium of the analysis. Building on the work of Winnicott, Stern and Langer, the author argues that each activity is rooted in the infant’s preverbal relationship (...)
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  50. John Bengson, Marc A. Moffett & Jennifer C. Wright (2009). The Folk on Knowing How. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):387–401.
    It has been claimed that the attempt to analyze know-how in terms of propositional knowledge over-intellectualizes the mind. Exploiting the methods of so-called “experimental philosophy”, we show that the charge of over-intellectualization is baseless. Contra neo-Ryleans, who analyze know-how in terms of ability, the concrete-case judgments of ordinary folk are most consistent with the view that there exists a set of correct necessary and sufficient conditions for know-how that does not invoke ability, but rather a certain sort of propositional knowledge. (...)
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