Search results for 'Domestic animals. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. R. Bellerby (1965). Farm Animal Welfare and World Food. London, One World Publications.score: 795.0
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  2. Jacob[from old catalog] Lindley (1946). Infant Philosophy, Containing an Analysis of the Faculties of the Mind, as Discovered in Their Development. Union Town [Pa.]Pub. By the Author.score: 518.4
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  3. Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans (1998). New Places for" Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals. Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.score: 252.0
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  4. Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans (1998). New Places for "Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals. Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.score: 252.0
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  5. Steven F. Sapontzis, John Stockwell, George P. Cave, Stephen Clark, Michael J. Cohen & Michael W. Fox (1993). From Jim Harter, Animals: 1419 Copyright-Free 1UustraJWns, 1979; Carol Belanger Grafton, Old. Between the Species 9 (3).score: 243.0
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  6. Robert Heeger (2005). Reasonable Partiality to Domestic Animals. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):123 - 139.score: 221.4
    The paper deals with partiality flowing from special relationships. Two main problems are discussed. The first concerns the relationship between partiality and genuine moral obligations. If partiality can bring about such obligations only if it is reasonable, what requirements should it meet in order to be reasonable? The second problem is one of animal ethics. Can the concept of reasonable partiality help us articulate what is morally at stake in a current discussion about the treatment of domestic animals, viz. (...)
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  7. James Rachels (1990/1991). Created From Animals: The Moral Implications of Darwinism. Oxford University Press.score: 189.0
    From Bishop Wilberforce in the 1860s to the advocates of "creation science" today, defenders of traditional mores have condemned Darwin's theory of evolution as a threat to society's values. Darwin's defenders, like Stephen Jay Gould, have usually replied that there is no conflict between science and religion--that values and biological facts occupy separate realms. But as James Rachels points out in this thought-provoking study, Darwin himself would disagree with Gould. Darwin, who had once planned on being a clergyman, was convinced (...)
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  8. Charles Darwin (1883/1998). The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 184.2
    The publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859 ignited a public storm he neither wanted nor enjoyed. Having offered his book as a contribution to science, Darwin discovered to his dismay that it was received as an affront by many scientists and as a sacrilege by clergy and Christian citizens. To answer the criticism that his theory was a theory only, and a wild one at that, he published two volumes in 1868 to demonstrate that evolution was (...)
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  9. Charles Darwin (1988). Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. New York University Press.score: 142.2
    Are they needed? To be sure. The Darwinian industry, industrious though it is, has failed to provide texts of more than a handful of Darwin's books. If you want to know what Darwin said about barnacles (still an essential reference to cirripedists, apart from any historical importance) you are forced to search shelves, or wait while someone does it for you; some have been in print for a century; various reprints have appeared and since vanished." -Eric Korn,Times Literary Supplement Charles (...)
     
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  10. Steve Cooke (2011). Duties to Companion Animals. Res Publica 17 (3):261-274.score: 129.6
    This paper outlines the moral contours of human relationships with companion animals. The paper details three sources of duties to and regarding companion animals: (1) from the animal’s status as property, (2) from the animal’s position in relationships of care, love, and dependency, and (3) from the animal’s status as a sentient being with a good of its own. These three sources of duties supplement one another and not only differentiate relationships with companion animals from wild animals and other categories (...)
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  11. Deborah Cao (2011). Visibility and Invisibility of Animals in Traditional Chinese Philosophy and Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):351-367.score: 129.6
    There is yet to be any animal welfare or protection law for domestic animals in China, one of the few countries in the world today that do not have such laws. However, in Chinese imperial law, there were legal provisions adopted more than a 1,000 years ago for the care and treatment of domestic working animals. Furthermore, in traditional Chinese philosophy, animals were regarded as constituent part of the organic whole of the cosmos by ancient Chinese philosophers who (...)
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  12. Florence Burgat (2004). Non-Violence Towards Animals in the Thinking of Gandhi: The Problem of Animal Husbandry. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):223-248.score: 126.0
    The question of the imperatives induced by the Gandhian concept of non-violence towards animals is an issue that has been neglected by specialists on the thinking of the Mahatma. The aim of this article is to highlight the systematic – and significant – character of this particular aspect of his views on non-violence. The first part introduces the theoretical foundations of the duty of non-violence towards animals in general. Gandhi's critical interpretation of cow-protection, advocated by Hinduism, leads to a general (...)
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  13. Eileen O'Rourke (2000). The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):144-165.score: 119.4
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the ``wild,'' in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized ``naturalness'' may be but another form of domestication. After an historical overview of the (...)
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  14. Pär Segerdahl (2007). Can Natural Behavior Be Cultivated? The Farm as Local Human/Animal Culture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (2):167-193.score: 117.6
    Although the notion of natural behavior occurs in many policy-making and legal documents on animal welfare, no consensus has been reached concerning its definition. This paper argues that one reason why the notion resists unanimously accepted definition is that natural behavior is not properly a biological concept, although it aspires to be one, but rather a philosophical tendency to perceive animal behavior in accordance with certain dichotomies between nature and culture, animal and human, original orders and invented artifacts. The paper (...)
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  15. Miriam Aronin (2012). Saving Animals From Volcanoes. Bearport Pub..score: 117.6
    In Saving Animals from Volcanoes, readers will meet the courageous people and organizations that rush in to save animals when disasters strike. from rescue ...
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  16. Stephen Person (2012). Saving Animals From Fires. Bearport Pub..score: 117.6
    In Saving Animals From Fires, readers will meet the courageous workers who risk their lives to rush into houses, forests, and rivers to rescue animals from fire ...
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  17. Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2011). Inspiring Respect for Animals Through the Law? Current Development in the Norwegian Animal Welfare Legislation. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):351-366.score: 114.0
    Over the last years, Norway has revised its animal welfare legislation. As of January 1, 2010, the Animal Protection Act of 1974 was replaced by a new Animal Welfare Act. This paper describes the developments in the normative structures from the old to the new act, as well as the main traits of the corresponding implementation and governance system. In the Animal Protection Act, the basic animal ethics principles were to avoid suffering, treat animals well, and consider their natural needs (...)
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  18. Katinka Waelbers, Frans Stafleu & Frans W. A. Brom (2004). Not All Animals Are Equal Differences in Moral Foundations for the Dutch Veterinary Policy on Livestock and Animals in Nature Reservations. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):497-515.score: 114.0
    The Netherlands is a small country with many people and much livestock. As a result, animals in nature reservations are often living near cattle farms. Therefore, people from the agricultural practices are afraid that wild animals will infect domestic livestock with diseases like Swine Fever and Foot and Mouth Disease. To protect agriculture (considered as an important economic practice), very strict regulations have been made for minimizing this risk. In this way, the practice of animal farming has been dominating (...)
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  19. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.score: 114.0
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
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  20. Patrick Toner (2007). An Old Argument Against Co-Location. Metaphysica 8 (1):45-51.score: 108.0
    I defend an old argument against co-location—the view that human animals are distinct from, but co-located with human persons. The argument is drawn from St. Thomas Aquinas. In order to respond to the argument, co-locationists have to endorse at least one of a trio of claims, none of which is obviously correct. Further, two of the options do not seem to be the sort of positions that should be flowing out of the acceptance of a general metaphysical position. I conclude (...)
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  21. Gianluigi Palombella (2007). The Rule of Law, Democracy, and International Law. Learning From the US Experience. Ratio Juris 20 (4):456-484.score: 108.0
    . The general issue addressed in this paper is the relation between the rule of law as a matter of national law, and as a matter of international law. Different institutional conceptions of this relationship give rise to different attitudes towards international law. Nonetheless, questions arise that cast doubt on age-old tenets of certain Western countries concerning the radical separability between the rule of law within the domestic system and in the international realm. The article will start considering some (...)
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  22. Narayanan Ganesan (2010). Worsening Schisms in Thai Domestic Politics. Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (1):125-147.score: 108.0
    The September 2006 military coup against the Thaksin government in Thailand has had a profound impact on Thai politics. It has arrested the process of democratic consolidation that was set in motion in the country in the 1990s. Although many of Thaksin's policies lacked the spirit of democratic governance, he was democratically elected and was ousted from power unconstitutionally. The entire tenure of Thaksin has brought to the fore two deep cleavages in Thailand. The first of these is the deep (...)
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  23. Anson Laytner, Daniel Ethan Bridge & Matthew Kaufmann (eds.) (2005). The Animals' Lawsuit Against Humanity: A Modern Adaptation of an Ancient Animal Rights Tale. Fons Vitae.score: 108.0
    In this interfaith and multicultural fable, eloquent representatives of all members of the animal kingdom—from horses to bees—come before the respected Spirit King to complain of the dreadful treatment they have suffered at the hands of humankind. During the ensuing trial, where both humans and animals testify before the King, both sides argue their points ingeniously, deftly illustrating the validity of both sides of the ecology debate. The ancient antecedents of this tale are thought to have originated in India, with (...)
     
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  24. Constance M. McCorkle (1995). Back to the Future: Lessons From Ethnoveterinary RD&E for Studying and Applying Local Knowledge. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 12 (2):52-80.score: 108.0
    Ethnoveterinary research, development, and extension (ERD&E) has emerged as a rich field for discovering, adapting, and transferring appropriate and sustainable animal health technologies to rural and peri-urban stockraisers, especially in Third World countries. This field is defined as the holistic, interdisciplinary study of local knowledge and practices, together with the social structure in which they are embedded, that pertain to the healthcare and healthful husbandry of animals used for a multitude of purposes. Especially in the Third World, livestock play a (...)
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  25. Bernice Bovenkerk, Frans Stafleu, Ronno Tramper, Jan Vorstenbosch & Frans W. A. Brom (2003). To Act or Not to Act? Sheltering Animals From the Wild: A Pluralistic Account of a Conflict Between Animal and Environmental Ethics. Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (1):13 – 26.score: 103.2
    The leading question of this article is whether it is acceptable, from a moral point of view, to take wild animals that are ill out of their natural habitat and temporarily bring them under human control with the purpose of curing them. To this end the so-called 'seal debate' was examined. In the Netherlands, seals that are lost or ill are rescued and taken into shelters, where they are cured and afterwards reintroduced into their natural environment. Recently, this practice has (...)
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  26. Rosine Chandebois & Jacob Faber (1987). From DNA Transcription to Visible Structure: What the Development of Multicellular Animals Teaches Us. Acta Biotheoretica 36 (2).score: 96.0
    This article is concerned with the problem of the relation between the genetic information contained in the DNA and the emergence of visible structure in multicellular animals. The answer is sought in a reappraisal of the data of experimental embryology, considering molecular, cellular and organismal aspects. The presence of specific molecules only confers a tissue identity on the cells when their concentration exceeds the threshold of differentiation. When this condition is not fulfilled the activity of the genes that code for (...)
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  27. Jette Steen Knudsen (2011). Company Delistings From the UN Global Compact: Limited Business Demand or Domestic Governance Failure? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):331-349.score: 96.0
    While a substantial amount of the literature describes corporate benefits of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, the literature is silent concerning why some companies announce CSR initiatives, yet fail to implement them. The article examines company delistings from the UN Global Compact. Delistings are surprising because the CSR agenda is seen as having won the battle of ideas. The analysis proceeds in two parts. I first analyze firm-level characteristics focusing on geography while controlling for sector and size; I find that (...)
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  28. Maurice Hamington (2008). Learning Ethics From Our Relationships with Animals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):177-188.score: 96.0
    The majority of animal advocacy discourse is unidirectional: Humans are regarded as stewards of animal welfare, and humans control the bestowal of rights and protections upon animals. This article offers a reversal of the typical moral reflection used in animal advocacy. I suggest that our relationship with animals participates in the development of moral faculties requisite for ethical behavior. In other words, we have a lot to learn from animals, not in this instance by documenting their behavior, but from having (...)
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  29. Prabha Kotiswaran (2012). Vulnerability in Domestic Discourses on Trafficking: Lessons From the Indian Experience. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (3):245-262.score: 96.0
    In recent years, rather than addressing the needs of sex workers themselves or of trafficked persons, international anti-trafficking law has been mobilised towards an ideological end, namely the abolition of sex work. The vulnerability of ‘third world’ female sex workers in particular has provided a potent image for justifying state intervention backed by the full force of the criminal law. Moral legitimacy has been afforded to this by a radical feminist discourse which views sex workers as nothing but hapless victims. (...)
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  30. Stephen Person (2012). Saving Animals From Oil Spills. Bearport Pub..score: 93.2
    The inspiring true stories in this book will warm the heart of any animal lover.
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  31. Julia Tanner (2011). Moral Status of Animals From Marginal Cases. In Michael Bruce Steven Barbone (ed.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 91.2
  32. Julia Tanner (2009). The Argument From Marginal Cases and the Slippery Slope Objection. Environmental Values 18 (1):51-66.score: 90.0
    Rationality (or something similar) is usually given as the relevant difference between all humans and animals; the reason humans do but animals do not deserve moral consideration. But according to the Argument from Marginal Cases not all humans are rational, yet if such (marginal) humans are morally considerable despite lacking rationality it would be arbitrary to deny animals with similar capacities a similar level of moral consideration. The slippery slope objection has it that although marginal humans are not strictly speaking (...)
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  33. T. Zarcone (2005). Stone People, Tree People and Animal People in Turkic Asia and Eastern Europe. Diogenes 52 (3):35-46.score: 90.0
    Some religious groups and trends of thought in the Turkic world, in Asia and Europe, have for several centuries nurtured an unusual vision of nature in which old animistic and shamanistic beliefs, and even nomads’ Buddhist beliefs, are combined with Arab philosophy stemming from Neo-Platonism and Muslim mysticism (Sufism). This vision, which in fact is not homogeneous since it exists in several variants, claims that all animate and inanimate creatures - humans, animals, plants and stones - are receptacles of the (...)
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  34. Morten Tønnessen (2009). Abstraction, Cruelty and Other Aspects of Animal Play (Exemplified by the Playfulness of Muki and Maluca). Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):558-578.score: 90.0
    Play behaviour is notorious for constituting a much debated, yet little clarified field of research. In this article, attempts are made to reach conclusions on the relation between human play and the play of other animals (especially cat play), as well as on the very character of play. The concept of Umwelt is reviewed, as are definitions of animal play, categorization of animal play and the role of meta-communication in playful behaviour. For some, play is a symbol of everythingthat is (...)
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  35. Susan McHugh (2009). Modern Animals: From Subjects to Agents in Literary Studies. Society and Animals 17 (4):363-367.score: 89.2
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  36. Jac A. A. Swart (2004). The Wild Animal as a Research Animal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):181-197.score: 87.6
    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e.g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to conservation goals. There are several differences between domesticated and wild animals that are relevant for evaluation of the acceptability of animal experiments. Biological features of wild animals are often more critical as compared with domesticated animals because of their survival (...)
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  37. Karen Brown (2011). Rabid Epidemiologies: The Emergence and Resurgence of Rabies in Twentieth Century South Africa. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):81 - 101.score: 84.6
    This article discusses the history of rabies in South Africa since the early twentieth century. It argues that rabies is a zoonotic disease that traverses rural and urban spaces, that transfers itself between wild and domestic animals and remains a potential threat to human life in the region. Scientists discovered an indigenous form of rabies, found primarily in the yellow mongoose, after the first biomedically confirmed human fatalities in 1928. Since the 1950s canine rabies, presumed to have moved southwards (...)
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  38. Thomas H. Huxley, The Origin of Species.score: 84.6
    h e Darwinian hypothesis has the merit of being eminently simple and comprehensible in principle, and its essential positions may be stated in a very few words: all species have been produced by the development of varieties from common stocks; by the conversion of these, first into permanent races and then into new species, by the process of natural selection , which process is essentially identical with that artificial selection by which man has originated the races of domestic animals—the (...)
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  39. L. T. Evans (1984). Darwin's Use of the Analogy Between Artificial and Natural Selection. Journal of the History of Biology 17 (1):113 - 140.score: 84.6
    The central role played by Darwin's analogy between selection under domestication and that under nature has been adequately appreciated, but I have indicated how important the domesticated organisms also were to other elements of Darwin's theory of evolution-his recognition of “the constant principle of change,” for instance, of the imperfection of adaptation, and of the extent of variation in nature. The further development of his theory and its presentation to the public likewise hinged on frequent reference to domesticates.We have seen (...)
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  40. Hamish Mccallum & Barbara Ann Hocking (2005). Reflecting on Ethical and Legal Issues in Wildlife Disease. Bioethics 19 (4):336–347.score: 84.6
    Disease in wildlife raises a number of issues that have not been widely considered in the bioethical literature. However, wildlife disease has major implications for human welfare. The majority of emerging human infectious diseases are zoonotic: that is, they occur in humans by cross-species transmission from animal hosts. Managing these diseases often involves balancing concerns with human health against animal welfare and conservation concerns. Many infectious diseases of domestic animals are shared with wild animals, although it is often unclear (...)
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  41. Karel Kleisner & Marco Stella (2009). Monsters We Met, Monsters We Made. Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):454-475.score: 84.6
    Creatures living under the rule of domestication form a communicative union based on shared morphological, behavioural, cognitive, and immunologicalresemblances. Domestic animals live under particular conditions that substantially differ from the original (natural) settings of their wild relatives. Here we focus on the fact that many parallel characters have appeared in various domestic forms that had been selected for different purposes. These characters are often unique for domestic animals and do not exist in wild forms. We argue that (...)
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  42. Shōeki Andō (1992). The Animal Court: A Political Fable From Old Japan. Weatherhill.score: 84.6
  43. Lewis Holloway, Carol Morris, Ben Gilna & David Gibbs (2011). Choosing and Rejecting Cattle and Sheep: Changing Discourses and Practices of (de)Selection in Pedigree Livestock Breeding. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):533-547.score: 84.6
    This paper examines the discourses and practices of pedigree livestock breeding, focusing on beef cattle and sheep in the UK, concentrating on an under-examined aspect of this—the deselection and rejection of some animals from future breeding populations. In the context of exploring how animals are valued and represented in different ways in relation to particular agricultural knowledge-practices, it focuses on deselecting particular animals from breeding populations, drawing attention to shifts in such knowledge-practices related to the emergence of “genetic” techniques in (...)
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  44. Stephen Person (2012). Saving Animals From Hurricanes. Bearport Pub..score: 83.2
    As young readers relive the dramatic events surrounding the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, they will witness firsthand the dramatic and courageous rescue ...
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  45. Josephine Donovan (2008). Feminism and the Treatment of Animals : From Care to Dialogue. In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 81.2
  46. Ron Epstein, Ethical Dangers of Genetic Engineering.score: 81.0
    From the very first milk you suckle, your food is genetically engineered. The natural world is completely made over, invaded and distorted beyond recognition by genetically engineered trees, plants, animals, insects, bacteria, and viruses, both planned and run amok. Illnesses are very different too. Most of the old ones are gone or mutated into new forms, yet most people are suffering from genetically engineered pathogens, either used in biowarfare, or mistakenly released into the environment, or recombined in toxic form from (...)
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  47. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 81.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  48. Roger J. H. King (1991). Environmental Ethics and the Case for Hunting. Environmental Ethics 13 (1):59-85.score: 81.0
    Hunting is a complex phenomenon. l examine it from four different perspectives-animal liberation, the land ethic, primitivism, and ecofeminism-and find no moral justification for sport hunting in any of them. At the same time, however, I argue that there are theoretical flaws in each of these approaches. Animal liberationists focus too much on the individual animal and ignore the difference between domestic and wild animals. Leopold’s land ethic fails to come to terms with the self-domestication of humans. I argue (...)
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  49. Theodore Sider (2002). Review of Lynne Rudder Baker, Persons and Bodies. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):45-48.score: 81.0
    Locke’s view that continuants are numerically distinct from their constituting hunks of matter is popular enough to be called the “standard account”.1 It was given its definitive contemporary statement by David Wiggins in Sameness and Substance2, and has been defended by many since. Baker’s interesting book contributes new arguments for this view, a new definition of ‘constitution’, and a sustained application to persons and human animals. Much of what she says develops this view in new and important ways. But in (...)
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  50. Edmond Wright, Perception as Epistemic: 'We Perceive Only What We Have Motivationally Selected as Entities'.score: 81.0
    If a sensory field exists as a pure natural sign open to all kinds of interpretation as evidence (see 'Sensing as non-epistemic'), what is it that does the interpreting? Borrowing from the old Gestalt psychologists, I have proposed a gestalt module that picks out wholes from the turmoil, it being the process of noticing or attending to , but the important difference from Koffka and Köhler (Koffka, 1935; Köhler, 1940), the originators of the term 'gestalt' in the psychology of perception (...)
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