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  1.  15
    John Dixon, Mark Levine, Steve Reicher, Kevin Durrheim, Dominic Abrams, Mark Alicke, Michal Bilewicz, Rupert Brown, Eric P. Charles & John Drury (2012). Beyond Prejudice: Are Negative Evaluations the Problem and is Getting Us to Like One Another More the Solution? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):411.
    For most of the history of prejudice research, negativity has been treated as its emotional and cognitive signature, a conception that continues to dominate work on the topic. By this definition, prejudice occurs when we dislike or derogate members of other groups. Recent research, however, has highlighted the need for a more nuanced and (Eagly 2004) perspective on the role of intergroup emotions and beliefs in sustaining discrimination. On the one hand, several independent lines of research have shown that unequal (...)
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  2.  12
    Dominic Abrams, Milica Vasiljevic & Hazel M. Wardrop (2012). Prejudice Reduction, Collective Action, and Then What? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):425-426.
    Despite downsides, it must, on balance, be good to reduce prejudice. Despite upsides, collective action can also have destructive outcomes. Improving intergroup relations requires multiple levels of analysis involving a broader approach to prejudice reduction, awareness of potential conflict escalation, development of intergroup understanding, and promotion of a wider human rights perspective.
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  3.  2
    Julie Van de Vyver, Diane M. Houston, Dominic Abrams & Milica Vasiljevic, Boosting Belligerence: How the July 7, 2005, London Bombings Affected Liberals’ Moral Foundations and Prejudice.
    Major terrorist events, such as the recent attacks in Ankara, Sinai, and Paris, can have profound effects on a nation’s values, attitudes, and prejudices. Yet psychological evidence testing the impact of such events via data collected immediately before and after an attack is understandably rare. In the present research, we tested the independent and joint effects of threat and political ideology on endorsement of moral foundations and prejudices among two nationally representative samples about 6 weeks before and 1 month after (...)
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  4.  15
    Dominic Abrams & Michael A. Hogg (1990). The Context of Discourse: Let's Not Throw Out the Baby with the Bathwater. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):219 – 225.
    An examination of Ian Parker's definitions of discourse reveals them to be non-distinctive and of limited utility. It is argued that discourse analysis should be integrated with, rather than set against, social psychology. Discourse analysts should attend to the issues of the representativeness and generality of their evidence, should be wary of attributing causality to discourse, and should consider the advantages of systematically investigating, rather than asserting, the social consequences of the use of different discourses.
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  5. Michael A. Hogg & Dominic Abrams (eds.) (2001). Intergroup Relations: Key Readings. Psychology Press.
    First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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