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  1. Dominic Hyde, How to Count Clouds.
    Can identity be vague? More exactly, can there be objects x and y such that it is vague whether x = y, and the vagueness is due to the objects themselves as opposed to vagueness in language used to denote the objects? The question has been extensively discussed since Evans (1978) where it was claimed that an affirmative answer was a necessary condition for the thesis that there could be vague objects. A recent, ingenious argument in Pinillos (2003) seeks to (...)
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  2. Zach Weber, David Ripley, Graham Priest, Dominic Hyde & Mark Colyvan (2014). Tolerating Gluts. Mind 123 (491):813-828.
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  3. Dominic Hyde (2013). Are the Sorites and Liar Paradox of a Kind? In Francesco Berto, Edwin Mares, Koji Tanaka & Francesco Paoli (eds.), Paraconsistency: Logic and Applications. Springer. 349--366.
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  4. Dominic Hyde (2011). The Sorites Paradox. In Giuseppina Ronzitti (ed.), Vagueness: A Guide. Springer Verlag. 1--17.
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  5. Dominic Hyde (2010). NJJ Smith, Vagueness and Degrees of Truth. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 16 (4).
     
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  6. Dominic Hyde (2010). The Prospects of a Paraconsistent Response to Vagueness. In Richard Dietz & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), Cuts and Clouds: Vaguenesss, its Nature and its Logic. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Dominic Hyde, Sorites Paradox. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The sorites paradox is the name given to a class of paradoxical arguments, also known as little by little arguments, which arise as a result of the indeterminacy surrounding limits of application of the predicates involved. For example, the concept of a heap appears to lack sharp boundaries and, as a consequence of the subsequent indeterminacy surrounding the extension of the predicate ‘is a heap’, no one grain of wheat can be identified as making the difference between being a heap (...)
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  8. Dominic Hyde & Mark Colyvan (2008). Paraconsistent Vagueness: Why Not? Australasian Journal of Logic 6:107-121.
    The idea that the phenomenon of vagueness might be modelled by a paraconsistent logic has been little discussed in contemporary work on vagueness, just as the idea that paraconsistent logics might be fruitfully applied to the phenomenon of vagueness has been little discussed in contemporary work on paraconsistency. This is prima facie surprising given that the earliest formalisations of paraconsistent logics presented in Ja´skowski (1948) and Halld’en (1949) were presented as logics of vagueness. One possible explanation for this is that, (...)
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  9. Dominic Hyde (2006). Book Reviews and Notices. The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays - Ed. G. Priest, J. C. Beall, and B. Armour-Garb. [REVIEW] International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2 Part 182):238-239.
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  10. Dominic Hyde (2006). The Law of Non-Contradiction. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):238-239.
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  11. Dominic Hyde (2003). Higher-Orders of Vagueness Reinstated. Mind 112 (446):301-305.
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  12. Dominic Hyde & E. J. Lowe (2003). Philosophy of Language. Philosophical Books 44 (2):174-178.
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  13. Dominic Hyde (2001). Richard (Routley) Sylvan: Writings on Logic and Metaphysics. History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (4):181-205.
    Richard Sylvan (né Routley) was one of Australasia's most prolific and systematic philosophers. Though known for his innovative work in logic and metaphysics, the astonishing breadth of his philosophical endeavours included almost all reaches of philosophy. Taking the view that very basic assumptions of mainstream philosophy were fundamentally mistaken, he sought radical change across a wide range of theories. However, his view of the centrality of logic and recognition of the possibilities opened up by logical innovation in the fundamental areas (...)
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  14. Dominic Hyde (2001). A Reply to Beall and Colyvan. Mind 110 (438):409--411.
  15. Dominic Hyde (1998). Vagueness, Ontology and Supervenience. The Monist 81 (2):297-312.
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  16. Dominic Hyde (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 104 (416):919-925.
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  17. Dominic Hyde (1995). Commentary. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (Supplement):253-261.
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  18. Dominic Hyde (1995). Proliferating Conceptions of Truth: Comments on McGee and McLaughlin. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):253-261.
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  19. Dominic Hyde (1994). Why Higher-Order Vagueness is a Pseudo-Problem. Mind 103 (409):35-41.
    Difficulties in arriving at an adequate conception of vagueness have led many writers to describe a phenomenon that has come to be known as "higher-order vagueness". Almost as many have found it to be a problem that needs to be addressed. In what follows I shall argue that, whilst we must acknowledge its presence, it is a pseudo-problem. The crucial point is the vagueness of "vague", which shows the phenomenon to be unproblematic though real enough.
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  20. Dominic Hyde & R. Sylvan (1993). Ubiquitous Vagueness Without Embarrassment. Acta Analytica 10 (1):7--29.
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  21. Dominic Hyde (1992). Rehabilitating Russell. Logique Et Analyse 137:139-173.
     
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  22. Dominic Hyde, Rehabilitating Russell, John S. Jeavons & John N. Crossley (1992). Table Des Matieres du Vol. 137-138. Logique Et Analyse 35:206.
     
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