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Profile: Dominic McIver Lopes (University of British Columbia)
  1.  62
    Dominic Lopes (1996). Understanding Pictures. Oxford University Press.
    There is not one but many ways to picture the world--Australian "x-ray" pictures, cubish collages, Amerindian split-style figures, and pictures in two-point perspective each draw attention to different features of what they represent. Understanding Pictures argues that this diversity is the central fact with which a theory of figurative pictures must reckon. Lopes advances the theory that identifying pictures' subjects is akin to recognizing objects whose appearances have changed over time. He develops a schema for categorizing the different ways pictures (...)
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  2.  22
    Dominic Lopes (2005). Sight and Sensibility. Oxford University Press.
    Sight and Sensibility will be essential reading for anyone working in aesthetics and art theory, and for all those intrigued by the power of images to affect ...
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  3.  15
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2007). Sight and Sensibility: Evaluating Pictures. Clarendon Press.
    Images have power - for good or ill. They may challenge us to see things anew and, in widening our experience, profoundly change who we are. The change can be ugly, as with propaganda, or enriching, as with many works of art. Sight and Sensibility explores the impact of images on what we know, how we see, and the moral assessments we make. Dominic Lopes shows how these are part of, not separate from, the aesthetic appeal of images. His book (...)
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  4.  31
    Dominic Lopes (2009). A Philosophy of Computer Art. Routledge.
    The machine in the ghost -- A computer art form -- Live wires: computing interaction -- Work to rule -- Artist to audience -- Computer art poetics -- Atari to art -- Envoi.
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  5. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the imagination (...)
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  6.  79
    Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes (2009). Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
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  7.  5
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2014). Beyond Art. OUP Oxford.
    This book offers a bold new approach to the philosophy of art. General theories of art don't work: they can't deal with problem cases. Instead of trying to define art, we should accept that a work of art is nothing but a work in one of the arts. Lopes's buck passing theory works well for the avant garde, illuminating its radical provocations.
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  8. Dominic M. M. Lopes (1997). Art Media and the Sense Modalities: Tactile Pictures. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):425-440.
    It is widely assumed that the art media can be individuated with reference to the sense modalities. Different art media are perceived by means of different sense modalities, and this tells us what properties of each medium are aesthetically relevant. The case of pictures appears to fit this principle well, for pictures are deemed purely and paradigmatically visual representations. However, recent psychological studies show that congenitally and early blind people have the ability to interpret and make raised‐line drawings through touch. (...)
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  9. Dominic McIver Lopes (2008). Nobody Needs a Theory of Art. Journal of Philosophy 105 (3):109-127.
    The question "what is art?" is often said to be venerable and vexing. In fact, the following answer to the question should be obvious: (R) item x is a work of art if and only if x is a work in practice P and P is one of the arts. Yet (R) has appeared so far from obvious that nobody has given it a moment's thought. The trouble is not that anyone might seriously deny the truth of (R), but rather (...)
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  10.  36
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2003). Pictures and the Representational Mind. The Monist 86 (4):632-652.
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  11. Dominic Mciver Lopes (2004). Directive Pictures. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):189–196.
    Pictures are principally descriptive. Advertising images highlight features of potential purchases; cartoons open portals to scenes in fictional worlds; snapshots in the family photo album remind us of our past selves and landmark events in our personal histories; works of pictorial art express thoughts or feelings about depicted scenes. In addition, pictures serve a directive or action-guiding function that, though not taken into account by theorists, deserves no less attention than their descriptive one. Theories of depiction and the appreciation of (...)
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  12.  60
    Dominic M. M. Lopes (2000). What is It Like to See with Your Ears? The Representational Theory of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):439-453.
    Representational theories of mind cannot individuate the sense modalities in a principled manner. According to representationalism, the phenomenal character of experiences is determined by their contents. The usual objection is that inverted qualia are possible, so the phenomenal character of experiences may vary independently of their contents. But the objection is inconclusive. It raises difficult questions about the metaphysics of secondary qualities and it is difficult to see whether or not inverted qualia are possible. This paper proposes an alternative test (...)
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  13. Brian Laetz & Dominic McIver Lopes (2008). Genre. In Paisley Livingston & Carl Plantinga (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film. Routledge 152-161.
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  14.  43
    Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2001). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics is an indispensable guide and reference source to the major thinkers and topics in aesthetics. Forty-six new entries by a team of renowned international contributors provide clear and up-to-date entries under four headings: historical, from Plato to Derrida; aesthetic theory, from definitions of art to pictorial representation; issues and challenges, from criticism to feminist aesthetics; and the individual arts, from literature to theatre.
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  15.  75
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2011). The Myth of (Non-Aesthetic) Artistic Value. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):518-536.
    Art works realize many values. According to tradition, not all of these values are characteristic of art: art works characteristically bear aesthetic value. Breaking with tradition, some now say that art works bear artistic value, as distinct from aesthetic value. I argue that there is no characteristic artistic value distinct from aesthetic value. The argument for this thesis suggests a new way to think about aesthetic value as it is characteristically realized by works of art.
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  16. Dominic McIver Lopes (2003). The Aesthetics of Photographic Transparency. Mind 112 (447):434--48.
    When we look at photographs we literally see the objects that they are of. But seeing photographs as photographs engages aesthetic interests that are not engaged by seeing the objects that they are of. These claims appear incompatible. Sceptics about photography as an art form have endorsed the first claim in order to show that there is no photographic aesthetic. Proponents of photography as an art form have insisted that seeing things in photographs is quite unlike seeing things face-to-face. This (...)
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  17.  61
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2008). Virtues of Art: Good Taste. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):197-211.
    If good taste is a virtue, then an account of good taste might be modelled on existing accounts of moral or epistemic virtue. One good reason to develop such an account is that it helps solve otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics. This paper proposes an alternative to neo-Aristotelian models of good taste. It then contrasts the neo-Aristotelian models with the proposed model, assessing them for their potential to contend with otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics.
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  18.  38
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2009). Drawing in a Social Science: Lithic Illustration. Perspectives on Science 17 (1):pp. 5-25.
    Scientific images represent types or particulars. According to a standard history and epistemology of scientific images, drawings are fit to represent types and machine-made images are fit to represent particulars. The fact that archaeologists use drawings of particulars challenges this standard history and epistemology. It also suggests an account of the epistemic quality of archaeological drawings. This account stresses how images integrate non-conceptual and interepretive content.
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  19.  16
    Dominic M. Mciver Lopes (2000). What Is It Like to See with Your Ears? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):439-453.
    Representational theories of mind cannot individuate the sense modalities in a principled manner. According to representationalism, the phenomenal character of experiences is determined by their contents. The usual objection is that inverted qualia are possible, so the phenomenal character of experiences may vary independently of their contents. But the objection is inconclusive. It raises difficult questions about the metaphysics of secondary qualities and it is difficult to see whether or not inverted qualia are possible. This paper proposes an alternative test (...)
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  20. Dominic McIver Lopes (2001). The Ontology of Interactive Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 35 (4):65-81.
     
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  21.  37
    Dominic Lopes (1995). Pictorial Realism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):277-285.
    This paper examines a form of pictorial realism that has epistemic import. Gombrich and Schier claim that some pictures are realistic because they convey accurate information. The difficulty is that judgments of realism vary across cultural and historical contexts. Goodman counters that pictures belong to different systems and realistic pictures belong to familiar systems. However, this does not explain the revelatory realism' of pictures in novel systems. I propose that two views can be combined: a realistic picture is one which (...)
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  22.  9
    Dominic Mciver Lopes (2015). Aesthetic Experts, Guides to Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):235-246.
    A theory of aesthetic value should explain the performance of aesthetic experts, for aesthetic experts are agents who track aesthetic value. Aesthetic empiricism, the theory that an item's aesthetic value is its power to yield aesthetic pleasure, suggests that aesthetic experts are best at locating aesthetic pleasure, especially given aesthetic internalism, the view that aesthetic reasons always have motivating force. Problems with empiricism and internalism open the door to an alternative. Aesthetic experts perform a range of actions not aimed at (...)
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  23.  61
    Dominic M. McIver Lopes (1999). Pictorial Color: Aesthetics and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):415 – 428.
    The representation of color by pictures raises worthwhile questions for philosophers and psychologists. Moreover, philosophers and psychologists interested in answering these questions will benefit by paying attention to each other's work. Failure to recognize the potential for interdisciplinary cooperation can be attributed to tacit acceptance of the resemblance theory of pictorial color. I argue that this theory is inadequate, so philosophers of art have work to do devising an alternative. At the same time, if the resemblance theory is false, then (...)
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  24.  72
    Dominic Lopes (1992). Pictures, Styles and Purposes. British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (4):330-341.
    Pictures belong to stylistic systems that vary historically and culturally. This variation suggests that styles are conventional. However, styles are not conventional. Styles have perceptual functions that make them apt for use in some contexts and not others.
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  25.  71
    Dominic Mciver Lopes (2007). The Aesthetic Function of Art. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):484–487.
  26. Dominic Lopes (1996). Understanding Pictures. Oxford University Press Uk.
    There is not one but many ways to picture the world - Australian `x-ray' pictures, cubist collages, Amerindian split-style figures, and pictures in two-point perspective each draw attention to different features of what they represent. The premise of Understanding Pictures is that this diversity is the central fact with which a theory of figurative pictures must reckon. Lopes argues that identifying pictures' subjects is akin to recognizing objects whose appearances have changed over time. He develops a schema for categorizing the (...)
     
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  27.  30
    Eileen John & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2004). Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub..
    This authoritative volume offers a handy compilation of contributions to the field by its leading figures.
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  28.  22
    Dominic M. McIver Lopes (2002). Vision, Touch, and the Value of Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):191-201.
    Since blind people can draw and interpret raised-line drawings, depiction is not an essentially visual medium. Neither is the art of pictures an essentially visual art form. The reasons given for evaluating a picture aesthetically may advert to its tactile qualities insteadof its visual qualities.In particular, a raised-line picture canbe valued for the tactile experience it elicits of the scene it depicts, just as a visual picture is sometimes valuedfor eliciting a visual experience of its subject. The argument for this (...)
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  29.  12
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2015). Aesthetics of Interaction in Digital Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):261-263.
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  30.  48
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2007). Art Without ‘Art’. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):1-15.
    Some argue that there is no art in some non-Western cultures because members of those cultures have no concept of art. Others argue that members of some non-Western cultures have concepts of art because they have art. Both arguments assume that if there is art in a given culture, then some members of the culture have a concept of art. There are reasons to think that this assumption is false; and if it is false, there are lessons to learn for (...)
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  31. Dominic McIver Lopes (2005). The Domain of Depiction. In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Blackwell
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  32.  45
    Dominic M. Mciver Lopes (1998). Imagination, Illusion and Experience in Film. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):343-353.
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  33.  26
    Diarmuid Costello & Dominic Mciver Lopes (2012). Introduction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):1-8.
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  34. Dominic McIver Lopes (2003). Out of Sight, Out of Mind. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts.
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  35.  40
    Dominic Mciver Lopes (2007). Shikinen Sengu and the Ontology of Architecture in Japan. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):77–84.
    Japan's Ise Jingu shrine has been taken down and rebuilt every twenty years for more than a millenium - a practice called "shikinen sengu." A standard ontology of architecture, according to which buildings are material particulars, implies that Ise Jingu is no more than twenty years old. However, a correct ontology of architecture is implicit in practices of architecture appreciation. The Japanese appreciation of Ise Jingu and other buildings in its architectural tradition implies both that it is no more than (...)
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  36.  9
    Dominic McIver Lopes & Andrea Naomi Walsh (2009). Objects of Appropriation. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley
  37.  6
    Dominic M. McIver Lopes (2000). A Philosophy of Mass Art. Philosophical Review 109 (4):614-617.
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  38.  21
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2000). From Languages of Art to Art in Mind. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):227-231.
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  39.  20
    Dominic Mciver Lopes (2008). Reference, Ontology, and Architecture: Response to Rafael de Clercq. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):194–196.
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  40.  3
    Dominic Mciver Lopes (2009). Aesthetic Acquaintance. Modern Schoolman 86 (3/4):267-281.
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  41.  5
    Michael Boylan, Denise Inge, Frederic Jameson, Scott Barry Kaufman, James C. Kaufman, Dominic Mciver Lopes, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Adrian Pabst, Angus Paddison & Fiona Price (2010). BENTON, MICHAEL. Literary Biography An Introduction.(London: Wiley-Blackwell). 2009. Pp. 280.£ 60.00 (Hbk). BERGMANN, SIGURD. In the Beginning is the Icon: A Liberative Theology of Images, Visual Arts and Culture.(London: Equinox Publishing Limited). 2009. Pp. 256.£ 50.00 (Hbk). [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):119.
  42.  4
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2012). Afterword: Photography and the “Picturesque Agent”. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):855-869.
    Even as art theory and analytic philosophy have failed to connect in their studies of photography, the two disciplines have joined in tying conceptions of the specific character of photography to ideas about automaticity and agency.1 In rough caricature, the philosopher reasons: “An item is a work of art only insofar as it is the product of agency, so a photograph is not an art work insofar it is not the product of artistic agency. After all, in Lady Eastlake's colorful (...)
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  43.  1
    Dominic McIver Lopes (2006). The Special and General Theory of Realism: Reply to Abell, Armstrong, and McMahon. Contemporary Aesthetics 4:40.
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  44. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic McIver Lopes (2012). Aesthetic Theory and Aesthetic Science: Prospects for Integration. In Steven Palmer & Arthur Shimamura (eds.), , with Vincent Bergeron, Aesthetic Science: Connecting Minds, Brains, and Experience. Oxford University Press
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  45. Berys Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2013). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics Third Edition. Routledge.
    The third edition of the acclaimed Routledge Companion to Aesthetics contains over sixty chapters written by leading international scholars covering all aspects of aesthetics. This companion opens with an historical overview of aesthetics including entries on Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Benjamin, Foucault, Goodman, and Wollheim. The second part covers the central concepts and theories of aesthetics, including the definitions of art, taste, the value of art, beauty, imagination, fiction, narrative, metaphor and pictorial representation. Part three is devoted to (...)
     
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  46. Berys Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2013). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    The third edition of the acclaimed _Routledge Companion to Aesthetics_ contains over sixty chapters written by leading international scholars covering all aspects of aesthetics. This companion opens with an historical overview of aesthetics including entries on Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Benjamin, Foucault, Goodman, and Wollheim. The second part covers the central concepts and theories of aesthetics, including the definitions of art, taste, the value of art, beauty, imagination, fiction, narrative, metaphor and pictorial representation. Part three is devoted to (...)
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  47. Berys Gaut, Dominic Lopes & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.) (2005). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    The second edition of the acclaimed _Routledge Companion to Aesthetics_ contains fifty-four chapters written by leading international scholars covering all aspects of aesthetics. This companion opens with an historical overview of aesthetics including entries on Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sibley and Derrida. The second part covers the central concepts and theories needed for a comprehensive understanding of aesthetics including the definitions of art, taste, value of art, beauty, imagination, fiction, narrative, metaphor and pictorial representation. Part three is devoted to (...)
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  48. Berys Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2005). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  49. Berys Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2000). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  50. Berys Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2002). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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