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Profile: Dominic Scott (University of Leeds)
  1. Dominic Scott (2013). Good Life. In Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.), Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. 347.
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  2. Dominic Scott (2013). Plato. Phronesis 58 (2):176-194.
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  3. Dominic Scott, One Virtue or Many? Aristotle's Politics 1.13 and the Meno.
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  4. Dominic Scott, Philosophy and Madness in the 'Phaedrus'.
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  5. Dominic Scott, Plato, Poetry and Creativity.
    The subject of this paper is poetic creativity as it features in various Platonic works: the nature and source of creativity, as well as the way in which it differs from the activity of philosophy. I shall argue that Plato gives us at least three quite different models of poetic creativity. One can be extracted from the Ion and the Meno, another from the Symposiim and a third from the Gorgias and Republic VI. The main focus of this paper will (...)
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  6. Laura Biron & Dominic Scott (2010). Getting Down to Business. The Philosophers' Magazine 49 (49):71-74.
    Some people have objected that the very idea of philosophy in business is an oxymoron. But why? Does philosophy have to be, by its very nature, other-worldly? If so, how could there be such a thing as political philosophy? Perhaps some would say that philosophers who become involved in business are engaging in a kind of intellectual prostitution. But studying business is different from being paid by business.
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  7. Dominic Scott, Alex Oliver & Miguel Ley-Pineda, Trade Marks as Property: A Philosophical Perspective.
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  8. Myles Burnyeat & Dominic Scott (eds.) (2007). Maieusis: Essays in Ancient Philosophy in Honour of Myles Burnyeat. Oxford University Press.
    Maieusis pays tribute to the highly influential work of Myles Burnyeat, whose contributions to the study of ancient philosophy have done much to enhance the ...
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  9. Dominic Scott (2007). Eros, Philosophy, and Tyranny. In Myles Burnyeat & Dominic Scott (eds.), Maieusis: Essays in Ancient Philosophy in Honour of Myles Burnyeat. Oxford University Press. 136--153.
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  10. Dominic Scott (2000). Aristotle and Thrasymachus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 19:225-52.
     
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  11. Dominic Scott (2000). Aristotle on Posthumous Fortune. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 18:211-29.
     
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  12. Dominic Scott (2000). Colloquium 1. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):xix-20.
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  13. Dominic Scott (2000). Metaphysics and the Defence of Justice in the Republic. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 16:1-20.
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  14. Dominic Scott (2000). Plato's Critique of the Democratic Character. Phronesis 45 (1):19-37.
    This paper tackles some issues arising from Plato's account of the democratic man in Rep. VIII. One problem is that Plato tends to analyse him in terms of the desires that he fulfils, yet sends out conflicting signals about exactly what kind of desires are at issue. Scholars are divided over whether all of the democrat's desires are appetites. There is, however, strong evidence against seeing him as exclusively appetitive: rather he is someone who satisfies desires from all three parts (...)
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  15. Dominic Scott (1999). Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: Dominic Scott. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):225–242.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being (eudaimonia) with one activity (intellectual contemplation), sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best (...)
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  16. Dominic Scott (1999). Platonic Pessimism and Moral Education. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 17 (15-36).
     
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  17. Dominic Scott (1999). Platonic Recollection. In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oup Oxford.
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  18. Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of learning in relation to (...)
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  19. Dominic Scott (1991). Socrate Prend-Il au Sérieux le Paradoxe de Ménon ? Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L'Étranger 181 (4):627 - 641.
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  20. Dominic Scott (1989). Epicurean Illusions. Classical Quarterly 39 (02):360-.
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  21. Dominic Scott (1987). Platonic Anamnesis Revisited. Classical Quarterly 37 (02):346-.