Search results for 'Dominion, Moira' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Angela Pinot de Moira, Narcis B. Kabatereine, David W. Dunne & Mark Booth (2011). Understanding Ethnic Differences in Behaviour Relating to Schistosoma Mansoni Re-Infection After Mass Treatment. Journal of Biosocial Science 43 (2):185-209.
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  2.  67
    Ronald Dworkin, Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion and Euthanasia.
    In 1993, Professor of Jurisprudence, Ronald Dworkin of Oxford University and Professor of Law at New York University, delivered the Georgetown Law Center’s thirteenth Annual Philip A. Hart Memorial Lecture: "Life’s Dominion: An Argument About Abortion and Euthanasia." Dworkin is Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at New York University. He received B.A. degrees from both Harvard College and Oxford University, and an LL.B. from Harvard Law School and clerked for Judge Learned Hand. He was associated (...)
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  3. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
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  4.  20
    Alain Ducharme (2014). Aristotle and the Dominion of Nature. Environmental Ethics 36 (2):203-214.
    Although it is often held that Aristotle endorses anthropocentric dominionism, Aristotle’s writings include an account of nonhuman value. The interpretation of Aristotle’s natural teleology which assumes that the claim that plants and animals are “for the sake of humans” entails an axiologically anthropocentric view of nature. However, a combination of aspects of Aristotle ethics and natural teleology shows that nature is valuable insofar as it is constituted by natural objects, things with natures. In virtue of having a nature, an object (...)
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  5.  2
    Stacy Douglas & Moira Gatens (2011). Revisiting the Continental Shelf: Moira Gatens on Law, Religion, and Human Rights in Eliot, Feuerbach, and Spinoza. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):75-82.
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  6.  23
    Lloyd H. Steffen (1992). In Defense of Dominion. Environmental Ethics 14 (1):63-80.
    The biblical notion of dominion has often been cited as the source and sanction for Western attitudes of environmental disregard. An analysis of the Genesis passage in which dominion (radah) is mentioned reveals a curious misreading of the text: dominion is actually an ideal of human-divine intimacy and peacefulness-as one ought to expect in a paradise creation story. I analyze Genesis dominion not only as areligious concept, but also as a philosophical notion manifesting the Hebrew self-understanding of its contemporary experience (...)
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  7.  27
    Maura Anne Ryan (1995). The New Reproductive Technologies: Defying God's Dominion? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (4):419-438.
    Objections that the New Reproductive Technologies pose temptations to "play God" are common. This essay examines three versions of the objection: 1) these technologies "usurp God's dominion in reproduction"; 2) they permit us to "make" our offspring; and 3) they involve us in a denial of human finitude. None proves to generate a decisive case against the New Reproductive Technologies; each requires some further argument to be persuasive. Nonetheless, warnings not to "play God" are shown to have an important parenetic (...)
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  8.  20
    David Mitchell (1995). The Importance of Being Important: Euthanasia and Critical Interests in Dworkin's Life's Dominion. Utilitas 7 (2):301.
    Near the beginning of the last chapter of Life's Dominion, Ronald Dworkin expounds the following problem. Margo has Alzheimer's disease. She suffers from ‘serious and permanent dementia’. It transpires that some years ago, at a time when she was mentally fully competent, Margo executed an advance directive. In this formal document she expressed her wishes concerning what should happen to her if she were to develop Alzheimer's. Should those wishes now be acceded to? For instance, suppose that in her document (...)
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  9.  3
    Rainer Vesterinen (2013). Instructions or Dominion?: The Meaning of the Spanish Subjunctive Mood. Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (2):359-379.
    In a highly interesting study, Dam and Dam-Jensen put forward the idea that the indicative and the subjunctive mood in Spanish complementizer phrases can be explained by the instructions they convey. The indicative instructs the addressee to locate the situation created by the verb relative to the situation of utterance, whereas the subjunctive instructs the addressee not to locate the situation described by the verb relative to the situation of utterance. Although this explanation is most appealing, the present paper argues (...)
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  10.  5
    Kathleen M. Squadrito (1979). Locke's View of Dominion. Environmental Ethics 1 (3):255-262.
    In this paper l examine the extent to which Locke’s reIigious and poIiticaI ideoIogy might be considered to exempIify values which have Ied to environmentaI deterioration. In the Two Treatises of Governlnent, Locke appears to hold a view of dominion which compromises humanitarian principles for economic gain. He often asserts that man has a right to accumulate property and to use land and animals for comfort and convenience. This right issues from God’s decree that men subdue the Earth and have (...)
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  11.  20
    Charles D. Tarlton (1999). ‘To Avoyd the Present Stroke of Death:’ Despotical Dominion, Force, and Legitimacy in Hobbe's Leviathan. Philosophy 74 (2):221-245.
    The logic of Leviathan is formally made to derive commonwealth and the rights of sovereignty (the obligations of subjects, read the other way around) from an elaborate process beginning in the physiology of human perception and passions, through language and reason, into the state of nature (the war of all against all) and, finally, under the direction of the laws of nature, to a collective and formal resignation of all their natural rights to create an absolute sovereign. This process of (...)
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  12.  2
    J. Coggon (2007). Death's Dominion Ethics at the End of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):742-742.
    Death’s Dominion is Simon Woods’ addition to the excellent and thought-provoking Facing Death series. Its timeliness is hardly at issue: the debate on euthanasia, end-of-life care and associated issues looks set to rage for some time. And it comes out at a time when the UK Parliament is debating a palliative care bill, designed to promote a duty of the state to provide palliative care to all who need it. The real concern with a work in this area is knowing (...)
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  13.  14
    Mohammed A. Bamyeh (2007). Of Death and Dominion: The Existential Foundations of Governance. Northwestern University Press.
    Death is the opposite not of life, but of power. And as such, Mohammed Bamyeh argues in this original work, death has had a great and largely unexplored impact on the thinking of governance throughout history, right down to our day. In Of Death and Dominion Bamyeh pursues the idea that a deep concern with death is, in fact, the basis of the ideological foundations of all political systems. Concentrating on four types of political systems—polis, empire, theocracy, and modern mass (...)
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  14.  10
    Melissa Lane & Ronald Dworkin (1994). Life's Dominion. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):413.
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  15.  76
    Kevin O'Rourke & Jean DeBlois (1994). Induced Delivery of Anencephalic Fetuses: A Response to James L. Walsh and Moira M. McQueen. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (1):47-53.
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  16.  27
    William Chase Greene (1945). Moira: Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought. Philosophical Review 54 (3):282-285.
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  17. Don Marquis (1996). Review Essay : Life, Death and Dworkin: Ronald Dworkin, Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom (New York: Knopf, 1993. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (6):127-131.
  18.  51
    Aida Míguez Barciela (2010). Moîra, Aión, Khrónos y la Noción de “Zeitlichkeit” En Sein Und Zeit. La Posibilidad de Un Espacio Hermenéutico. Ontology Studies 10:199-207.
  19.  81
    T. L. S. Sprigge (2000). Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests: Lewis Petrinovich, Cambridge, Mass, London, England, MIT Press, 1999, Ix + 431 Pages, Pound31.50 (Hc). [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):412-412.
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  20.  14
    Thomas P. Peardon (1947). Dominion Status Today. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 22 (4):607-618.
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  21.  12
    Kay de Vries (2007). Book Review: Woods S 2007: Death's Dominion. Ethics at the End of Life. Maidenhead. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 14 (6).
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  22.  12
    Robert Stanley, James Swindal, William S. Watson & Julia A. Johnson (2003). Religion and Religious Values in Three Pivotal Novels of Julien Green: Moira (1950), Chaque Homme Sans Sa Nuit (1950) and L'Autre (1971). [REVIEW] Ultimate Reality and Meaning 26 (2):109-125.
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  23.  9
    S. M. D. (1945). Moira. Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 42 (14):389-391.
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  24.  52
    Monica Brito Vieira (2003). Mare Liberum Vs. Mare Clausum : Grotius, Freitas, and Selden's Debate on Dominion Over the Seas. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):361-377.
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  25.  58
    P. Singer (2000). Review. Darwinian Dominion: Animal Welfare and Human Interests. L Petrinovich. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):495-498.
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  26.  29
    John P. Doyle (1986). Peter John Olivi on Right, Dominion, and Voluntary Signs. Semiotics:419-429.
  27.  6
    Amitrajeet A. Batabyal (2001). Fragile Dominion: Complexity and the Commons By Simon Levin. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (2):239-240.
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  28.  4
    Brian Vickers (2007). Francis Bacon, Feminist Historiography, and the Dominion of Nature. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):117-141.
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  29.  11
    Christopher P. Long (2007). The Daughters of Metis: Patriarchal Dominion and the Politics of the Between. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):67-86.
  30.  21
    Christopher Robertson (2004). The Notion of Sovereign Exclusive Dominion for Global Political Justice. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (1):231-239.
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  31.  7
    Michael A. Ryan (2012). Whalen, Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009. Pp. 328; B&W Figs. $32.50. ISBN: 9780674036291. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1269-1271.
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  32.  11
    Ruiping Fan (2005). A Reconstructionist Confucian Account of Environmentalism: Toward a Human Sagely Dominion Over Nature. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):105-122.
  33. M. Campetella (1995). Gli epigrammi per i morti in mare dell'Antologia greca: il realismo, l'etica e la Moira. Annali Della Facoltà di Lettere E Filosofia 28:47-86.
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  34.  4
    Colter Ellis & Leslie Irvine (2010). Reproducing Dominion: Emotional Apprenticeship in the 4-H Youth Livestock Program. Society and Animals 18 (1):21-39.
    This paper examines young people’s socialization into the doctrine known as “dominionism,” which justifies the use of animals in the service of human beings. Using qualitative research, it focuses on the 4-H youth livestock program, in which boys and girls raise cattle, pigs, goats, and sheep for slaughter. The analysis portrays 4-H as an apprenticeship in which children learn to do cognitive emotion work, use distancing mechanisms, and create a “redemption” narrative to cope with contradictory ethical and emotional experiences. Although (...)
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  35.  4
    A. Shewan (1916). The Dominion of Peleus. The Classical Review 30 (07):184-186.
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  36.  9
    Nicholas Everitt (1994). Life's Dominion. Philosophy Now 11:40-41.
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  37.  15
    J. Tate (1945). Moira William Chase Greene: Moira: Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought. Pp. Viii+450. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Milford), 1944. Cloth, $5.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):12-14.
  38.  4
    D. T. & E. G. Berry (1944). The History and Development of the Concept of Qeia Moira and Qeia Tuxh Down to and Including Plato. Journal of Hellenic Studies 64:118.
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  39.  3
    J. F. Lazenby (1995). The Archaia Moira: A Suggestion. Classical Quarterly 45 (01):87-.
    In discussions of the complex and controversial problem of Spartan land-tenure,1 the mysterious ‘ρχαα μορα’ has assumed an importance out of all proportion to its prominence in the sources, for the actual phrase only occurs once in extant literature. It owes its importance to the fact that the reference to it has been used to support the theory that there were two categories of land in Sparta, a theory which in turn is held to explain how, when all Spartans supposedly (...)
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  40.  3
    Risto Saarinen (1998). Liberty and Dominion: Luther, Prierias and Ringleben. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 40 (2):171-181.
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  41.  3
    Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel (2014). The Will for Self-Preservation: Locke and Derrida on Dominion, Property and Animals. Substance 43 (2):148-161.
    “Consider, once more, the universal cannibalism of the sea; all of whose creatures prey upon each other, carrying on eternal war since the world began”Despite the strong growth of animal studies within the academy, fundamental critiques of human utilization of animals remain, arguably, on the margins. Classic analytic approaches, such as that advanced by Peter Singer (1975) and Tom Regan (1983), while having a powerful shaping effect on the language of animal advocacy, have been slow to dent academic endeavor, and (...)
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  42.  4
    C. S. Campbell (1993). Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom, Ronald Dworkin. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):303-306.
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  43.  18
    Nancy S. Jecker & Courtney S. Campbell (1994). Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom, Ronald Dworkin. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993. 273 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):303.
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  44.  17
    Lawrence C. Becker (1992). Community, Dominion, and Membership. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):17-43.
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  45.  13
    A. W. H. Adkins (1968). Moira B. C. Dietrich: Death, Fate and the Gods: The Development of a Religious Idea in Greek Popular Belief and in Homer. Pp. Xii+390. London: Athlone Press, 1965. Cloth, 75s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (02):194-197.
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  46.  15
    Katharine Park (2007). Response to Brian Vickers, "Francis Bacon, Feminist Historiography, and the Dominion of Nature". Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):143-146.
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  47.  10
    C. L. ten (1991). Review Essay / Dominion as the Target of Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (2):40-46.
    John Braithwaite and Philip Pettit, Not Just Deserts: A Republican Theory of Criminal Justice, Oxford Clarendon Press, 1990, vii + 229 pp.
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  48.  2
    Charles Whitney (1989). Francis Bacon's "Instauratio": Dominion of and Over Humanity. Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (3):371.
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  49.  17
    James Lindemann Nelson (1995). Two Essays in Public Philosophy: Callahan'sthe Troubled Dream of Life and Dworkin'slife's Dominion. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1):115-123.
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  50.  19
    Thomas Hobbes, Dominion.
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