Search results for 'Don Gifford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Don Gifford (2011). Zones of Re-Membering: Time, Memory, and (Un)Consciousness. Rodopi.score: 300.0
    For Gifford, the profoundest explorer of the human consciousness, time, and memory is James Joyce and in its range of reference, wit, and humanity the spirit of ...
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  2. David M. Kaplan (2009). What Things Still Don't Do. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (2):229 - 240.score: 24.0
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek’s What Things Do ( 2006 ). The four things that Verbeek does well are: (1) remind us of the importance of technological things; (2) bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; (3) explain how technology “co-shapes” experience by reading Bruno Latour’s actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde’s post-phenomenology; (4) develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: (1) analyze the material conditions in which (...)
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  3. Javier Muguerza (2011). Utopía y melancolía en Don Quijote. Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 43:63-82.score: 24.0
    The clash between these two dimensions of human condition – but also their complementary nature – make utopia and melancholy specially compelling as they address us today from Don Quixote’s text, providing an accurate standing from which both the author and his protagonist become our contemporaries. Taking an ethic point of departure, we shall consider the aim of the fantasies of Don Quixote is to modify the reality in a certain moral sense, despite of his ridiculously and impractical goals. At (...)
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  4. Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Larry A. Hickman, Robert Rosenberger, Robert C. Scharff & Don Ihde (2012). Book Symposium on Don Ihde's Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):249-270.score: 21.0
    Book Symposium on Don Ihde’s Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0060-5 Authors Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Farimagsgade 5 A, Room 10.0.27, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark Larry A. Hickman, The Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA Robert Rosenberger, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, DM Smith Building, 685 Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0345, USA Robert C. Scharff, University of New (...)
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  5. D. N. Byrne (2013). After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson. [REVIEW] Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board.score: 21.0
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  6. José Antonio Santiago Sánchez (2012). Anfitrion o la maldad del don. Daimon 58:141-154.score: 21.0
    En este artículo se utiliza el mito y la figura de Anfitrión para analizar el juego situacional entre los roles antitéticos, pero también complementarios, del anfitrión y el invitado, así como la dialéctica entre lo privado y lo público. Por último, el mito da pie para analizar el complejo papel de la deuda moral en dicha interactuaciónDon, público, privado, deuda moral, anfitrión, invitado.
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  7. Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan (2007). Wanting Things You Don't Want: The Case for an Imaginative Analogue of Desire. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (9):1-17.score: 18.0
    You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”.
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  8. Mark Phelan (2013). Evidence That Stakes Don't Matter for Evidence. Philosophical Psychology (4):1-25.score: 18.0
    Evidence that stakes don’t matter for evidence. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2012.733363.
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  9. Alexander A. Guerrero (2007). Don't Know, Don't Kill: Moral Ignorance, Culpability, and Caution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (1):59-97.score: 18.0
    This paper takes on several distinct but related tasks. First, I present and discuss what I will call the “Ignorance Thesis,” which states that whenever an agent acts from ignorance, whether factual or moral, she is culpable for the act only if she is culpable for the ignorance from which she acts. Second, I offer a counterexample to the Ignorance Thesis, an example that applies most directly to the part I call the “Moral Ignorance Thesis.” Third, I argue for a (...)
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  10. Thomas Kroedel (2013). Why Epistemic Permissions Don't Agglomerate – Another Reply to Littlejohn. Logos and Episteme 4 (4):451–455.score: 18.0
    Clayton Littlejohn claims that the permissibility solution to the lottery paradox requires an implausible principle in order to explain why epistemic permissions don't agglomerate. This paper argues that an uncontentious principle suffices to explain this. It also discusses another objection of Littlejohn's, according to which we’re not permitted to believe lottery propositions because we know that we’re not in a position to know them.
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  11. Alexander Sarch (2011). Internalism About a Person's Good: Don't Believe It. Philosophical Studies 154 (02):161 - 184.score: 18.0
    Internalism about a person's good is roughly the view that in order for something to intrinsically enhance a person's well-being, that person must be capable of caring about that thing. I argue in this paper that internalism about a person's good should not be believed. Though many philosophers accept the view, Connie Rosati provides the most comprehensive case in favor of it. Her defense of the view consists mainly in offering five independent arguments to think that at least some form (...)
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  12. Don Ihde (2008). Aging: I Don't Want to Be a Cyborg! [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):397-404.score: 18.0
    Examination is made of a range of cyborg solutions to bodily problems due to damage, but here with particular reference to aging. Both technological and animal implants, transplants and prosthetic devices are phenomenologically analyzed. The resultant trade-off phenomena are compared to popular culture technofantasies and desires and finally to human attitudes toward mortality and contingency. The parallelism of resistance to contingent existence and to becoming a cyborg is noted.
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  13. David J. Cole (1999). I Don't Think So: Pinker on the Mentalese Monopoly. Philosophical Psychology 12 (3):283-295.score: 18.0
    Stephen Pinker sets out over a dozen arguments in The language instinct (Morrow, New York, 1994) for his widely shared view that natural language is inadequate as a medium for thought. Thus he argues we must suppose that the primary medium of thought and inference is an innate propositional representation system, mentalese. I reply to the various arguments and so defend the view that some thought essentially involves natural language. I argue mentalese doesn't solve any of the problems Pinker cites (...)
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  14. Keith DeRose (2000). Now You Know It, Now You Don't. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:91-106.score: 18.0
    Resistance to contextualism comes in the form of many very different types of objections. My topic here is a certain group or family of related objections to contextualism that I call “Now you know it, now you don’t” objections. I responded to some such objections in my “Contextualism and Knowledge Attributions” a few years back. In what follows here, I will expand on that earlier response in various ways, and, in doing so, I will discuss some aspects of David Lewis’s (...)
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  15. David Papineau (2003). Why You Don’T Want to Get in the Box with Schrödinger's Cat. Analysis 63 (277):51–58.score: 18.0
    By way of an example, Lewis imagines your being invited to join Schrödinger’s cat in its box for an hour. This box will either fill up with deadly poison fumes or not, depending on whether or not some radioactive atom decays, the probability of decay within an hour being 50%. The invitation is accompanied with some further incentive to comply (Lewis sets it up so there is a significant chance of some pretty bad but not life-threatening punishment if you don’t (...)
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  16. David James (2008). The Significance of Kierkegaard's Interpretation of Don Giovanni in Relation to Hegel's Philosophy of Art. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):147 – 162.score: 18.0
    (2008). The significance of kierkegaard's interpretation of Don Giovanni in relation to Hegel's philosophy of art1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 147-162.
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  17. William James (1902/2002). The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature: Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902. Dover Publications.score: 18.0
    After completing his monumental work, The Principles of Psychology, William James turned his attention to serious consideration of such important religious and philosophical questions as the nature and existence of God, immortality of the soul, and free will and determinism. His interest in these questions found expression in various works, including The Varieties of Religious Experience, his classic study of spirituality. Based on the prestigious Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion he gave at the University of Edinburgh in 1901 and (...)
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  18. Eduardo Mendieta, Evan Selinger & Don Ihde (2003). Don Ihde Bodies in Technology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):95–111.score: 18.0
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  19. William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky.score: 18.0
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be together'. (...)
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  20. Gregory Bergman (2011). I Watch, Therefore I Am: From Socrates to Sartre, the Great Mysteries of Life as Explained Through Howdy Doody, Marcia Brady, Homer Simpson, Don Draper, and Other Tv Icons. Adams Media.score: 18.0
    What's the world made of? Donuts! and Beer! -- Protagoras, Gorgias, Captain Kirk, and Denny Crane -- Socrates : The Sergeant Schultz of Ancient Greece -- Plato is the new American Idol -- Aristotle loves Lucy -- Charlie Harper's Non-Epicurean lifestyle -- St. Augustine's Highway to Heaven -- Scully shaves Mulder with Ockham's Razor -- Larry Hagman dreams of Descartes -- Locke versus Hobbes, or The Brady Bunch takes on Survivor -- Can or can't Kant like vampires? -- Reading Hegel (...)
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  21. Paul Vincent Spade, Why Don't Mediaeval Logicians Ever Tell Us What They're Doing? Or, What is This, a Conspiracy?score: 18.0
    What I want to talk about here is a puzzle for historians of philosophy who, like me, have spent a fair amount of time studying the history of mediaeval logic and semantic theory. I don’t know how to solve it, but in various forms it has come up repeatedly in my own work and in the work of colleagues I have talked with about it. I would like to share it with you now.
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  22. Kathryn Hunter (1996). “Don't Think Zebras”: Uncertainty, Interpretation, and the Place of Paradox in Clinical Education. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).score: 18.0
    Working retrospectively in an uncertain field of knowledge, physicians are engaged in an interpretive practice that is guided by couterweighted, competing, sometimes paradoxical maxims. When you hear hoofbeats, don't think zebras, is the chief of these, the epitome of medicine's practical wisdom, its hermeneutic rule. The accumulated and contradictory wisdom distilled in clinical maxims arises necessarily from the case-based nature of medical practice and the narrative rationality that good practice requires. That these maxims all have their opposites enforces in students (...)
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  23. Don Marquis (2011). Don Marquis Replies. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):9-11.score: 18.0
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  24. Robert C. Scharff (2012). Don Ihde: Heidegger's Technologies: Postphenomenological Perspectives. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):297-306.score: 18.0
    Don Ihde: Heidegger’s technologies: Postphenomenological perspectives Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-10 DOI 10.1007/s11007-012-9215-z Authors Robert C. Scharff, Department of Philosophy, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3574, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  25. Sherwin Klein (1998). Don Quixote and the Problem of Idealism and Realism in Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):43-63.score: 18.0
    I discuss the characters Don Quixote and Sancho Panza and their relationship in order to understand better the place of idealistictheory and realistic practice in business ethics. The realism of Sancho Panza is required to make the idealism of Don Quixote effective.Indeed, the interaction and development of these characters can serve as a model for both the effective communication between andblending of the idealistic moral theoretician and the practical businessperson. Specifically, I argue that a quixotified Sancho Panza,as a combination of (...)
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  26. Nicholas Asher (1984). Meanings Don't Grow on Trees. Journal of Semantics 3 (3):229-247.score: 18.0
    In “Meanings don't grow on Trees” I investigate Lewis's proposal for using syntactical information to distinguish between intensions. Lewis's proposal, if it succeeds, would eliminate certain deficiencies in the predictions made by possible world semantics concerning synonymy. I provide two criteria for judging semantic theories: descriptive adequacy and explanatory adequacy. I argue that Lewis's proposal concerning synonymy fails on both counts. I then offer a different approach to problems with synonymy. Synonymy judgments involve two different kinds of meaning: truth conditional (...)
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  27. Yishai Cohen (2014). Don’T Count on Taurek: Vindicating the Case for the Numbers Counting. Res Publica 20 (3):245-261.score: 18.0
    Suppose you can save only one of two groups of people from harm, with one person in one group, and five persons in the other group. Are you obligated to save the greater number? While common sense seems to say ‘yes’, the numbers skeptic says ‘no’. Numbers Skepticism has been partly motivated by the anti-consequentialist thought that the goods, harms and well-being of individual people do not aggregate in any morally significant way. However, even many non-consequentialists think that Numbers Skepticism (...)
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  28. Mary K. Hendrickson, Harvey S. James & William D. Heffernan (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):311-328.score: 18.0
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  29. David M. Kaplan (2009). Review: What Things Still Don't Do. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (2):229 - 240.score: 18.0
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek's What Things Do (2006). The four things that Verbeek does well are: (1) remind us of the importance of technological things; (2) bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; (3) explain how technology "co-shapes" experience by reading Bruno Latour's actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde's post-phenomenology; (4) develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: (1) analyze the material conditions in which things are (...)
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  30. Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer (2007). Revisiting Equipoise: A Response to Gifford. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):227-246.score: 18.0
    : The authors respond to objections Fred Gifford has raised against their paper "Rehabilitating Equipoise." They situate this exchange in the wider context of recent debate over equipoise, highlighting substantial points of agreement between themselves and Gifford. The authors offer a brief restatement of "Rehabilitating Equipoise" in which they amplify some of its core arguments. They then assess Gifford's objections. Finding each to be unfounded, they argue that there is no justification for "pulling the plug" on clinical (...)
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  31. Simon C. Moore & Mike Oaksford (2000). Is What You Feel What You Don't Know? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):211-212.score: 18.0
    Rolls defines emotion as innate reward and punishment. This could not explain our results showing that people learn faster in a negative mood. We argue that what people know about their world affects their emotional state. Negative emotion signals a failure to predict negative reward and hence prompts learning to resolve the ignorance. Thus what you don't know affects how you feel.
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  32. Raymond A. Belliotti (1989). Blood is Thicker Than Water: Don't Forsake the Family Jewels. Philosophical Papers 18 (3):265-280.score: 18.0
    (1989). BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER: DON'T FORSAKE THE FAMILY JEWELS. Philosophical Papers: Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 265-280. doi: 10.1080/05568648909506323.
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  33. Terry D. Cooper (2011). Psychology, Religion, and Critical Hermeneutics: Don Browning as “Horizon Analyst”. Zygon 46 (3):686-697.score: 18.0
    Abstract. Don Browning's career involved a deep exploration into the frequently hidden philosophical assumptions buried in various forms of psychotherapeutic healing. These healing methodologies were based on metaphors and metaphysical assumptions about both the meaning of human fulfillment and the ultimate context of our lives. All too easily, psychological theories put forward philosophical anthropologies while claiming to be operating within a modest, empirical approach. Browning does not fault or criticize these psychotherapeutic enterprises for making such claims because he thinks these (...)
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  34. O. Muramoto (1999). Bioethics of the Refusal of Blood by Jehovah's Witnesses: Part 3. A Proposal for a Don't-Ask-Don't-Tell Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):463-468.score: 18.0
    Of growing concern over Jehovah's Witnesses' (JWs) refusal of blood is the intrusion of the religious organisation into its members' personal decision making about medical care. The organisation currently may apply severe religious sanctions to JWs who opt for certain forms of blood-based treatment. While the doctrine may be maintained as the unchangeable "law of God", the autonomy of individual JW patients could still be protected by the organisation modifying its current policy so that it strictly adheres to the right (...)
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  35. Michael J. Rulon (1997). Donald MacKay's Final Lectures—the Gifford Lectures. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):517 – 521.score: 18.0
    Delivered only months before his death, the Gifford Lectures allowed Donald MacKay to clarify and to emphasize his views on many important issues. MacKay stressed the primacy of personal experience and the differences between persons, brains, and machines. These positions are reviewed here, as are some of the reasons why MacKay may remain relatively unknown among American psychologists, philosophers, and neuroscientists.
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  36. Kelly C. Smith (1992). The New Problem of Genetics: A Response to Gifford. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):331-348.score: 18.0
    Recently, Fred Gifford attempted to explicate the meaning of the term genetic as applied to phenotypic traits. He takes as his primary goal the explication of how the term is used and tries to avoid conclusions about how it should be used. He proposes two independent criteria (DF and PI) which together capture much of what biologists mean when they describe traits as genetic. Although Gifford's approach is extremely insightful in many ways, I argue that his analysis is (...)
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  37. Wesley J. Wildman (2011). The Artful Humanism of Don Browning. Zygon 46 (3):698-712.score: 18.0
    Abstract. Don Browning's intellectual artfulness is particularly evident in three areas: as analyst of basic assumptions in intellectual systems, as fundamental ethicist, and as mediating theologian. His work in each area has been extraordinarily fruitful, both theoretically and practically. In each area, however, his skillful handling of complex issues also has subtle limitations. This paper identifies those limitations, analyzes them as facets of an articulate but preemptive defense of a preferred theological outlook, and thus as a limited failure of Browning's (...)
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  38. L. E. Acuna (2000). Don't Cry for Us Argentinians: Two Decades of Teaching Medical Humanities. Medical Humanities 26 (2):66-70.score: 18.0
    Medical humanities—history, literature, anthropology, ethics and fine arts applied to medicine—play an important role in medical education. For more than 20 years an effort has been made to obtain an academic identity for such a multidisciplinary approach. A distinction between humanitarianism and humanism is attempted here, the former being associated with medical care and the latter with medical education. In order more precisely to define the relationship between the arts and medicine, an alternative term “medical kalology”, as-yet-unsanctioned, coined after the (...)
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  39. Rosa MacGinley (2014). Nagoyo: The Life of Don Angelo Confalonieri Among the Aborigines of Australia 1846-1848 [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (1):117.score: 18.0
    MacGinley, Rosa Review of: Nagoyo: The life of Don Angelo confalonieri among the aborigines of Australia 1846-1848, by Stefano Girola and Rolando Pizzini, eds, trnsl. Claudia Masilli , pp.238.
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  40. Genia Schönbaumsfeld (2013). Art and the ‘Morality System’: The Case of Don Giovanni. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):n/a-n/a.score: 18.0
    Mozart's great opera, Don Giovanni, poses a number of significant philosophical and aesthetic challenges, and yet it remains, for the most part, little discussed by contemporary philosophers. A notable exception to this is Bernard Williams's important paper, ‘Don Juan as an Idea’, which contains an illuminating discussion of Kierkegaard's ground-breaking interpretation of the opera, ‘The Immediate Erotic Stages or the Musical-Erotic’, in Either/Or. Kierkegaard's pseudonymous author's approach here is, in some respects, reminiscent of a currently rather fashionable narrative-inspired moral philosophy, (...)
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  41. M. Viljoen (2010). Embodiment and the Experience of Built Space: The Contributions of Merleau-Ponty and Don Ihde. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (3).score: 18.0
    This paper explores the problem of how we perceive built space and the ways that we relate to its abstract representations. Poincaré presented the problem that space poses for the 20th century in his essay ‘The Relativity of Space’, in which the human body and technics are already a part of our spatial perceptions. Merleau-Ponty, the “philosopher of the body”, and Don Ihde, a philosopher of technology, ground their work on the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger (to different (...)
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  42. Jean-Marc Leveratto (2012). Georges Bataille et l'anthropologie du don. le Portique. Revue de Philosophie Et de Sciences Humaines (29).score: 18.0
    Découvert par l’intermédiaire d’Alfred Métraux , l’enseignement de Marcel Mauss a profondément et durablement impressionné Georges Bataille, qui désigne explicitement l’ Essai sur le don comme l’« origine » de ses deux essais sociologiques , l’article sur La Notion de dépense publié en 1933 , et le texte intitulé La Part maudite , publié en 1949. Le degré et la nature de l’influence exercée par les écrits de Marcel Mauss sur la pensée de Georges Bataille ont fait l’objet de nombreuses (...)
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  43. K. Hendrickson Mary, S. James Harvey & D. Heffernan William (2008). Does the World Need U.S. Farmers Even If Americans Don't? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4).score: 18.0
    We consider the implications of trends in the number of U.S. farmers and food imports on the question of what role U.S. farmers have in an increasingly global agrifood system. Our discussion stems from the argument some scholars have made that American consumers can import their food more cheaply from other countries than it can produce it. We consider the distinction between U.S. farmers and agriculture and the effect of the U.S. food footprint on developing nations to argue there might (...)
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  44. Selena R. Ewing (2011). I Don't Want to Be a Burden. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (3):40.score: 18.0
    Ewing, Selena R Sometimes we find a question in bioethics that seems so mundane and common that nobody cares to consider it, and yet it has no easy answer. The question of my current research project is this. When an elderly person, perhaps your parent or your patient, says 'I don't want to be a burden,' what do they mean and how should we respond?
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  45. [deleted]Molly J. Henry Jonas Obleser, Björn Herrmann (2012). Neural Oscillations in Speech: Don't Be Enslaved by the Envelope. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Neural Oscillations in Speech: Don't be Enslaved by the Envelope.
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  46. Kevin Moore (2012). Brains Don't Predict; They Trial Actions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Brains Don’t Predict; They Trial Actions.
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  47. Tecnico Acfs (2006). A Don francisco Ayala, con reconocimiento Y afecto. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 40:243-253.score: 18.0
    Don Francisco Ayala cumple los cien años de edad; ésta ha sido la excusa para hacerle una serie de homenajes que se le debían en el ámbito académico y también en el extra-académico. Los Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez ya publicaron un texto de don Francisco en esta misma sección de “Documentos” hace algunos años (“Los derechos individuales como garantía de la libertad”, Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez, núm. 36, 2002, págs. 329-341), como modesto reconocimiento e incitación al (...)
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  48. Sylvain Bromberger (1992). On What We Don't Know When We Don't Know Why. In , Essays on What We Know We Don't Know. Csli.score: 18.0
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  49. Freeman J. Dyson (1988/2004). Infinite in All Directions: Gifford Lectures Given at Aberdeen, Scotland, April-November 1985. Perennial.score: 18.0
    Infinite in All Directions is a popularized science at its best. In Dyson's view, science and religion are two windows through which we can look out at the world around us. The book is a revised version of a series of the Gifford Lectures under the title "In Praise of Diversity" given at Aberdeen, Scotland. They allowed Dyson the license to express everything in the universe, which he divided into two parts in polished prose: focusing on the diversity of (...)
     
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  50. Selena R. Ewing (2012). Volume 23 Issue 3 - 'I Don't Want to Be a Burden'. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (3):40-.score: 18.0
    Ewing, Selena R Sometimes we find a question in bioethics that seems so mundane and common that nobody cares to consider it, and yet it has no easy answer. The question of my current research project is this. When an elderly person, perhaps your parent or your patient, says 'I don't want to be a burden,' what do they mean and how should we respond?
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