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Donald C. Ainslie [17]Donald Cameron Ainslie [1]
  1. Donald C. Ainslie (forthcoming). Principlism. Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  2. Owen Ware & Donald C. Ainslie (2014). Consciousness and Personal Identity. In Aaron Garrett (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. 245-264.
    This paper offers an overview of consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century philosophy. Locke introduces the concept of persons as subjects of consciousness who also simultaneously recognize themselves as such subjects. Hume, however, argues that minds are nothing but bundles of perceptions, lacking intrinsic unity at a time or across time. Yet Hume thinks our emotional responses to one another mean that persons in everyday life are defined by their virtues, vices, bodily qualities, property, riches, and the like. Rousseau also (...)
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  3. Donald C. Ainslie (2010). Adequate Ideas and Modest Scepticism in Hume's Metaphysics of Space. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (1):39-67.
    In the Treatise of Human Nature , Hume argues that, because we have adequate ideas of the smallest parts of space, we can infer that space itself must conform to our representations of it. The paper examines two challenges to this argument based on Descartes's and Locke's treatments of adequate ideas, ideas that fully capture the objects they represent. The first challenge, posed by Arnauld in his Objections to the Meditations , asks how we can know that an idea is (...)
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  4. Donald C. Ainslie (2009). Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy. By P. J. E. Kail. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 40 (2):292-296.
    Peter Kail’s comprehensive, thoughtful, and challenging book focuses on Hume’s use of projectionFthe appeal to mental phenomena to explain manifest features of the worldFin his treatments of external objects, causation, and morality. Almost all interpreters of Hume acknowledge a role for projection, but Kail is the first to unpack the metaphor, and to show the different ways in which projection works in different domains.
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  5. Donald C. Ainslie (2006). Hume's "Life" and the Virtues of the Dying. In Thomas Mathien & D. G. Wright (eds.), Autobiography as Philosophy: The Philosophical Uses of Self-Presentation. Routledge.
  6. Donald C. Ainslie (2006). Review of Marina Frasca-Spada, P. J. E. Kail (Eds.), Impressions of Hume. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (4).
  7. Donald C. Ainslie (2003). Hume, a Scottish Socrates?: Critical Notice of Terence Penelhum, Themes in Hume: The Self, The Will, Religion. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):133-154.
  8. Donald C. Ainslie (2003). Review: Hume, a Scottish Socrates? [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):133 - 154.
  9. Donald C. Ainslie (2002). AIDS and Sex: Is Warning a Moral Obligation? Health Care Analysis 10 (1):49-66.
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  10. Donald C. Ainslie (2002). Bioethics and the Problem of Pluralism. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):1-28.
    The state that we inhabit plays a significant role in shaping our lives. For not only do its institutions constrain the kinds of lives we can lead, but it also claims the right to punish us if our choices take us beyond what it deems to be appropriate limits. Political philosophers have traditionally tried to justify the state's power by appealing to their preferred theories of justice, as articulated in complex and wide-ranging moral theories—utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the like. One of (...)
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  11. Donald C. Ainslie (2001). Hume's Reflections on the Identity and Simplicity of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):557-578.
    The article presents a new interpretation of Hume’s treatment of personal identity, and his later rejection of it in the “Appendix” to the Treatise. Hume’s project, on this interpretation, is to explain beliefs about persons that arise primarily within philosophical projects, not in everyday life. The belief in the identity and simplicity of the mind as a bundle of perceptions is an abstruse belief, not one held by the “vulgar” who rarely turn their minds on themselves so as to think (...)
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  12. Donald C. Ainslie (2000). `Watching' Medicine: Do Bioethicists Respect Patients' Privacy? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (6):537-552.
    Agich has identified `watching' – the formal orinformal observation of the medical setting – as oneof the four main roles of the clinical bioethicist. By an analysis of a case study involving a bioethicsstudent who engaged in watching at an HIV/AIDS clinicas part of his training, I raise questions about theethical justification of watching. I argue that theinvasion of privacy that watching entails makes theactivity unacceptable unless the watcher has receivedprior consent from the patients who are beingobserved. I conclude that, (...)
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  13. Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Questioning Bioethics: AIDS, Sexual Ethics, and the Duty to Warn. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):26-35.
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  14. Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Reason and Feeling in Hume's Action Theory and Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 25 (1/2):266-269.
  15. Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Reason and Feeling in Hume's Action Theory and Moral Philosophy: Hume's Reasonable Passion (Review). [REVIEW] Hume Studies 25 (1):266-269.
  16. Donald C. Ainslie (1999). Scepticism About Persons in Book II of Hume's Treatise. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):469-492.
  17. Donald C. Ainslie (1995). The Problem of the National Self in Hume's Theory of Justice. Hume Studies 21 (2):289-313.