22 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Donald Hatcher [12]Donald L. Hatcher [9]Donald J. Hatcher [1]
  1. Donald L. Hatcher (2001). Why Percy Can't Think: A Response to Bailin. Informal Logic 21 (2).
    In "The Problem with Percy: Epistemology, Understanding and Critical Thinking," Sharon Bailin argues that critical thinking skills do not generalize because students do not understand the larger epistemological picture in which to situate the importance of arguments and reasons. More plausible explanations are: (I) instructors across the disciplines do not give assignments requiring critical thinking (CT) skills, (2) single courses in CT have little effect, (3) pragmatic arguments showing the effectiveness of CT are more effective than epistemological arguments with the (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Donald Hatcher, Tony Brown & Kelli Gariglietti (2001). Critical Thinking and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy. Inquiry 20 (3):6-18.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Donald Hatcher (2000). Arguments for Another Definition of Critical Thinking. Inquiry 20 (1):3-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Donald L. Hatcher (1999). Why Critical Thinking Should Be Combined With Written Composition. Informal Logic 19 (2).
    This paper provides evidence and arguments that, given the choice of teaching critical thinking and written composition as separate, stand-alone courses or combining them, the two should be combined into an integrated sequence.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Donald L. Hatcher (1999). Why Formal Logic is Essential for Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 19 (1).
    After critiquing the arguments against using formal logic to teach critical thinking, this paper argues that for theoretical, practical, and empirical reasons, instruction in the fundamentals of formal logic is essential for critical thinking, and so should be included in every class that purports to teach critical thinking.
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Donald Hatcher & Lucy Price (1998). Why Critical Thinking and Composition Belong Together (and Vice Versa). Inquiry 17 (4):19-30.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Donald Hatcher (1997). Three Theories of Rationality. Inquiry 17 (2):4-19.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Donald Hatcher (1996). Plato's “Meno”. Inquiry 16 (1):1-8.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Donald Hatcher (1995). CriticaI Thinking and Epistemic Obligations. Inquiry 14 (3):28-40.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Donald Hatcher (1995). Should Anti-Realists Teach Critical Thinking? Inquiry 14 (4):29-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Donald L. Hatcher (1995). Combining Critical Thinking and Written Composition. Inquiry 15 (2):20-36.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Donald L. Hatcher (1994). Critical Thinking, Postmodernism, and Rational Evaluation. Informal Logic 16 (3).
    In this paper, after showing how the postmodern critiques of Enlightenment rationality apply to critical thinking, I argue that a critical discussion on any subject must assume specific principles of rationality. I then show how these principles can be used to critique and reject postmodern claims about the contextual nature of rationality.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Terry L. Devietti, John A. D'Andrea, Donald J. Hatcher & Michael D. Reddix (1993). A Training Procedure for Obtaining Contrast-Sensitivity Functions Within a Single Session in Monkeys. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (4):245-248.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Donald L. Hatcher (1992). Epistemology and Pedagogy. Inquiry 10 (2):1-1.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Donald L. Hatcher (1992). Hatcher, From Page One. Inquiry 10 (2):14-16.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Donald Hatcher (1991). Can Critical Thinking Survive the Postmodern Challenge? Inquiry 7 (1):8-9.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Donald Hatcher (1991). Hatcher (Continued From Page 9). Inquiry 7 (1):16-17.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Donald L. Hatcher (1991). Achieving Extraordinary Ends: An Essay on Creativity. Informal Logic 13 (1).
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Donald Hatcher (1990). Reasoning and Writing. Inquiry 6 (4):18-18.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Donald Hatcher (1989). Some Problems with Plantinga's Reformed Epistemology. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 10 (1):21 - 31.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Donald L. Hatcher (1989). Existential Ethics and Why It's Immoral to Be a Housewife. Journal of Value Inquiry 23 (1):59-68.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Donald Hatcher (1986). Plantinga and Reformed Epistemology. Philosophy and Theology 1 (1):84-95.
    After summarizing Plantinga’s critique of “classical foundationalism” and his substitute, Reformed epistemology, the paper argues that Reformed epistemology has so many problems that it is not an adequate substitute for classical foundationalism. Given Plantinga’s reformed epistemology, believers of any religion could have “knowledge of their God.” This is because Plantinga has not set forth the justifying conditions necessary to distinguish between “properly basic beliefs” as opposed to improperly basic beliefs. Given such problems, it is more reasonable to stick with classical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation