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Donald D. Hoffman [16]Donald Hoffman [1]
  1. Donald Hoffman (2008). Conscious Realism and the Mind-Body Problem. Mind and Matter 6 (1):87-121.
    Despite substantial efforts by many researchers, we still have no scientific theory of how brain activity can create or be con- scious experience. This is troubling since we have a large body of correlations between brain activity and consciousness, correlations normally assumed to entail that brain activity creates conscious experience. Here I explore a solution to the mind-body problem that starts with the converse assumption: these correlations arise because consciousness creates brain activity and indeed creates all objects and properties of (...)
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  2. Donald D. Hoffman (2006). The Scrambling Theorem: A Simple Proof of the Logical Possibility of Spectrum Inversion. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):31-45.
  3. Donald D. Hoffman (2006). The Scrambling Theorem Unscrambled: A Response to Commentaries. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):51-53.
  4. Donald D. Hoffman (2003). Does Perception Replicate the External World? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):415-416.
    Vision scientists standardly assume that the goal of vision is to recover properties of the external world. Lehar's “miniature, virtual-reality replica of the external world inside our head” (target article, sect. 10) is an example of this assumption. I propose instead, on evolutionary grounds, that the goal of vision is simply to provide a useful user interface to the external world.
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  5. Donald D. Hoffman & Manish Singh (2003). Vision: Form Perception. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  6. Bruce M. Bennett, Donald D. Hoffman & Chetan Prakash (2002). Perception and Evolution. In Dieter Heyer & Rainer Mausfeld (eds.), Perception and the Physical World. Wiley. 229--245.
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  7. Temre N. Davies & Donald D. Hoffman (2002). Psychophysical Studies of Expressions of Pain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):458-459.
    What differentiates expressions of pain from other facial expressions? Which facial features convey the most information in an expression of pain? To answer such questions we can explore the expertise of human observers using psychophysical experiments. Techniques such as change detection and visual search can advance our understanding of facial expressions of pain and of evolved mechanisms for detecting these expressions.
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  8. Todd R. Davies, Donald D. Hoffman & Agustin M. G. Rodriguez (2002). Visual Worlds: Construction or Reconstruction? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):72-87.
  9. Donald D. Hoffman & Chetan Prakash (2002). Bruce M. Bennett. In Dieter Heyer & Rainer Mausfeld (eds.), Perception and the Physical World. Wiley. 229.
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  10. Donald D. Hoffman (2001). The Data Problem for Color Objectivism. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):74-77.
  11. Manish Singh & Donald D. Hoffman (1999). Perception, Inference, and the Veridicality of Natural Constraints. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):395-396.
    Pylyshyn's target article argues that perception is not inferential, but this is true only under a narrow construal of inference. A more general construal is possible, and has been used to provide formal theories of many visual capacities. This approach also makes clear that the evolution of natural constraints need not converge to the “veridical” state of the world.
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  12. Manish Singh & Donald D. Hoffman (1998). Active Vision and the Basketball Problem. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):772-773.
    It is fruitful to think of the representational and the organism-centered approaches as complementary levels of analysis, rather than mutually exclusive alternatives. Claims to the contrary by proponents of the organism-centered approach face what we call the “basketball problem.”.
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  13. Donald D. Hoffman & Manish Singh (1997). Salience of Visual Parts. Cognition 63 (1):29-78.
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  14. Manish Singh & Donald D. Hoffman (1997). Constructing and Representing Visual Objects. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):98-102.
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  15. Donald D. Hoffman (1993). No Perception Without Representation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):247.
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  16. Bruce M. Bennett, Donald D. Hoffman & Chetan Prakash (1991). Unity of Perception. Cognition 38 (3):295-334.
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