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Profile: Donald L. M. Baxter (University of Connecticut)
  1. Donald L. M. Baxter, Assent in Sextus and Hume.
  2. Donald L. M. Baxter (forthcoming). Hume on Space and Time. In Paul Russell (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of David Hume. Oxford University Press.
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  3. Donald L. M. Baxter & A. J. Cotnoir (eds.) (forthcoming). Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Donald L. M. Baxter (2013). Instantiation as Partial Identity: Replies to Critics. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (2):291-299.
    One of the advantages of my account in the essay “Instantiation as Partial Identity” was capturing the contingency of instantiation—something David Armstrong gave up in his experiment with a similar view. What made the contingency possible for me was my own non-standard account of identity, complete with the apparatus of counts and aspects. The need remains to lift some obscurity from the account in order to display its virtues to greater advantage. To that end, I propose to respond to those (...)
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  5. Donald L. M. Baxter (2011). Hume, Distinctions of Reason, and Differential Resemblance. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):156-182.
  6. Donald L. M. Baxter (2009). Hume's Theory of Space and Time in its Sceptical Context. In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
  7. Donald L. M. Baxter (2009). Précis of Hume's Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise. Philosophical Studies 146 (3):407 - 411.
    Donald L. M. Baxter\textquoteright{}s meticulous attention to textual detail yields a highly original interpretation of some of the most neglected or maligned parts of Hume\textquoteright{}s Treatise. The book will be useful to those interested in the metaphysics of identity and time, and the epistemology of metaphysics, and will be indispensable to Hume scholars, who have lacked an in-depth treatment of these crucial and intricate issues.
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  8. Donald L. M. Baxter (2009). Replies to Perry, Falkenstein, and Garrett. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 146 (3):445 - 455.
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  9. Donald L. M. Baxter (2008). Hume's Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise. Routledge.
    Donald L. M. Baxter’s meticulous attention to textual detail yields a highly original interpretation of some of the most neglected or maligned parts of Hume’s Treatise. The book will be useful to those interested in the metaphysics of identity and time, and the epistemology of metaphysics, and will be indispensable to Hume scholars, who have lacked an in-depth treatment of these crucial and intricate issues.
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  10. Donald L. M. Baxter (2005). Altruism, Grief, and Identity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):371–383.
    The divide between oneself and others has made altruism seem irrational to some thinkers, as Sidgwick points out. I use characterizations of grief, especially by St. Augustine, to question the divide, and use a composition-as-identity metaphysics of parts and wholes to make literal sense of those characterizations.
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  11. Kate Abramson, Donald Ainslie, Donald L. M. Baxter, Tom L. Beauchamp, Martin Bell, Richard Bett, John Bricke, Philip Bricker, Justin Broackes & Stephen Buckle (2003). Hume Studies Referees, 2002–2003. Hume Studies 29 (2).
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  12. Donald L. M. Baxter (2001). Hume on Steadfast Objects and Time. Hume Studies 27 (1):129-148.
  13. Donald L. M. Baxter (2001). Instantiation as Partial Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):449 – 464.
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  14. Donald L. M. Baxter (2001). Loose Identity and Becoming Something Else. Noûs 35 (4):592–601.
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  15. Donald L. M. Baxter (2000). A Humean Temporal Logic. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000 (Analytic Philosophy and Logic):209-216.
    Hume argues that the idea of duration is just the idea of the manner in which several things in succession are arrayed. In other words, the idea of duration is the idea of successiveness. He concludes that all and only successions have duration. Hume also argues that there is such a thing as a steadfast object—something which co-exists with many things in succession, but which is not itself a succession. Thus, it seems that Hume has committed himself to a contradiction: (...)
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  16. Donald L. M. Baxter (2000). Hume's Puzzle About Identity. Philosophical Studies 98 (2):187-201.
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  17. Donald L. M. Baxter (2000). Leibniz on Contingent Conceptual Truths in the Arnauld Correspondence. Studia Leibnitiana 32 (2):191 - 214.
    Zu Arnauld und im Discours de métaphysique sagt Leibniz, daß alle Wahrheiten begrifflich (prädikativ) und manche gleichwohl kontingent sind. Ich untersuche das Problem im Hinblick auf mögliche Wesen, die ich als möglich auch betrachte und versuche nachzuweisen, daß die Position keinen Widerspruch enthält, weil Leibniz zwei Arten begrifflichen Enthaltenseins unterscheidet -logisch und kausal: Die erste ist notwendig, die zweite jedoch kontingent und nur hypothetisch notwendig, notwendig also lediglich unter der Voraussetzung des vorgegebenen freien Willens Gottes. Es gibt insofern auch zwei (...)
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  18. Donald L. M. Baxter (1999). The Discernibility of Identicals. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:37-55.
    I argue via examples that there are cases in which things that are not two distinct things qualitatively differ without contradiction. In other words, there are cases in which something differs from itself. Standard responses to such cases are to divide the thing into distinct parts, or to conceive of the thing under different descriptions, or to appeal to different times, or to deny that the property had is the property lacked. I show these responses to be unsatisfactory. I then (...)
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  19. Donald L. M. Baxter (1998). Hume's Labyrinth Concerning the Idea of Personal Identity. Hume Studies 24 (2):203-233.
    In the Treatise Hume argues that the self is really many related perceptions, which we represent to ourselves as being one and the same thing. In the Appendix he finds this account inconsistent. Why? The problem arises from Hume's theory that representation requires resemblance. Only a many can represent a many recognized as such, and only a one can represent something as one. So for the many distinct perceptions (recognized as such) to be represented as one and the same, the (...)
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  20. Donald L. M. Baxter (1997). Abstraction, Inseparability, and Identity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (2):307-330.
    Berkeley and Hume object to Locke's account of abstraction. Abstraction is separating in the mind what cannot be separated in reality. Their objection is that if a is inseparable in reality from b, then the idea of a is inseparable from the idea of b. The former inseparability is the reason for the latter. In most interpretations, however, commentators leave the former unexplained in explaining the latter. This article assumes that Berkeley and Hume present a unified front against Locke. Hume (...)
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  21. Donald L. M. Baxter (1994). Corporeal Substances and True Unities. The Leibniz Review 4 (2):9-10.
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  22. James Allan, Robert F. Anderson, Shane Andre, Pall S. Ardal, R. F. Atkinson, Luigi Bagolini, Annette Baier, Stephen Barker, Marcia Baron & Donald L. M. Baxter (1993). An Index of Hume Studies: 1975-1993. Hume Studies 19 (2):327-364.
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  23. Donald L. M. Baxter (1992). Continuity and Common Sense. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (3):93-97.
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  24. Donald L. M. Baxter (1991). Berkeley, Perception, and Identity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (1):85-98.
  25. Donald L. M. Baxter (1989). Free Choice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (March):12-24.
  26. Donald L. M. Baxter (1989). Identity Through Time and the Discernibility of Identicals. Analysis 49 (3):125 - 131.
  27. Donald L. M. Baxter (1988). Hume on Infinite Divisibility. History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (2):133-140.
  28. Donald L. M. Baxter (1988). Identity in the Loose and Popular Sense. Mind 97 (388):575-582.
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  29. Donald L. M. Baxter (1988). Many-One Identity. Philosophical Papers 17 (3):193-216.
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  30. Donald L. M. Baxter (1987). A Defense of Hume on Identity Through Time. Hume Studies 13 (2):323-342.
    Allegedly hume begs the question when explaining the idea of identity through time. I argue that this accusation rests on the false assumption that all perceptions are momentary and so any lengthy perception is rather a number of perceptions in succession. I conclude that the idea of identity is an uneasy combination of a single lengthy idea and a number of ideas in succession. In this way it is a "medium betwixt unity and number.".
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