Search results for 'Dori Bloom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark Alicke, David Rose & Dori Bloom (2011). Causation, Norm Violation, and Culpable Control. Journal of Philosophy 108 (12):670-696.
    Causation is one of philosophy's most venerable and thoroughly-analyzed concepts. However, the study of how ordinary people make causal judgments is a much more recent addition to the philosophical arsenal. One of the most prominent views of causal explanation, especially in the realm of harmful or potentially harmful behavior, is that unusual or counternormative events are accorded privileged status in ordinary causal explanations. This is a fundamental assumption in psychological theories of counterfactual reasoning, and has been transported to philosophy by (...)
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  2. Irene Bloom (1989). Response to Professor Huang Siu-Chi's Review of "Knowledge Painfully Acquired", by Lo Ch'in-Shun and Translated by Irene Bloom. Philosophy East and West 39 (4):459-463.
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  3. Tsui Bloom (2000). Plotkin, & Bassett (2000), Bloom SS, Tsui AO, Plotkin M., Bassett S., What Husbands in Northern India Know About Reproductive Health, Correlates of Knowledge About Pregnancy and Maternal and Sexual Health. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (2).
     
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  4.  41
    Paul Bloom (2013). Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil. Crown.
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired with (...)
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  5.  4
    Harold Bloom (1975). Poetry, Revisionism, Repression. Critical Inquiry 2 (2):233-251.
    The strong word and stance issue only from a strict will, a will that dares the error of reading all of reality as a text, and all prior texts as openings for its own totalizing and unique interpretations. Strong poets present themselves as looking for truth in the world, searching in reality and in tradition, but such a stance, as Nietzsche said, remains under the mastery of desire, of instinctual drives. So, in effect, the strong poet wants pleasure and not (...)
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  6.  9
    Leslie Rebecca Bloom (1997). A Feminist Reading of Men's Health: Or, When Paglia Speaks, the Media Listens. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (1):59-73.
    In this paper Bloom analyzes the popular magazine, Men's Health, from a feminist perspective, locating ways that the magazine participates in an insidious form of anti-feminist backlash. She specifically analyzes the magazine to make sense of how its writers discursively position women in their relationships to heterosexual men and how they use the voices of women who call themselves feminists to promote an anti-feminist, pro-patriarchy agenda. She demonstrates that the “health” of men being promoted in this magazine is a (...)
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  7.  6
    Harold Bloom (2011). The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life. Yale University Press.
    Bloom leads readers through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years.
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  8. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Selection and Natural Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-784.
     
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  9. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, confers (...)
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  10.  37
    Paul Bloom (2000). Two Reasons to Abandon the False Belief Task as a Test of Theory of Mind. Cognition 77 (1):25-31.
  11.  98
    Paul Bloom (1996). Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts. Cognition 60 (1):1-29.
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  12.  75
    Paul Bloom, Religion is Natural.
    Despite its considerable intellectual interest and great social relevance, religion has been neglected by contemporary develop- mental psychologists. But in the last few years, there has been an emerging body of research exploring children’s grasp of certain universal religious ideas. Some recent findings suggest that two foundational aspects of religious belief – belief in divine agents, and belief in mind–body dualism – come naturally to young children. This research is briefly reviewed, and some future directions..
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  13.  19
    Yoel Inbar, David A. Pizarro & Paul Bloom (2009). Conservatives Are More Easily Disgusted Than Liberals. Cognition and Emotion 23 (4):714-725.
    The uniquely human emotion of disgust is intimately connected to morality in many, perhaps all, cultures. We report two studies suggesting that a predisposition to feel disgust is associated with more conservative political attitudes, especially for issues related to the moral dimension of purity. In the first study, we document a positive correlation between disgust sensitivity and self-reported conservatism in a broad sample of US adults. In Study 2 we show that while disgust sensitivity is associated with more conservative attitudes (...)
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  14. John H. Goldthorpe, A. H. Halsey, A. F. Heath, J. M. Ridge, Leonard Bloom & F. L. Jones (1982). Social Mobility and Class Structure in Modern Britain. Ethics 92 (4):766-768.
     
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  15.  19
    Konika Banerjee & Paul Bloom (2013). Would Tarzan Believe in God? Conditions for the Emergence of Religious Belief. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):7-8.
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  16.  11
    Mark Sheskin, Paul Bloom & Karen Wynn (2014). Anti-Equality: Social Comparison in Young Children. Cognition 130 (2):152-156.
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  17.  9
    Konika Banerjee & Paul Bloom (2014). Why Did This Happen to Me? Religious Believers’ and Non-Believers’ Teleological Reasoning About Life Events. Cognition 133 (1):277-303.
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  18.  2
    Paul Bloom (1994). Generativity Within Language and Other Cognitive Domains. Cognition 51 (2):177-189.
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  19.  10
    Valerie A. Kuhlmeier, Paul Bloom & Karen Wynn (2004). Do 5-Month-Old Infants See Humans as Material Objects? Cognition 94 (1):95-103.
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  20.  26
    Matt Bloom (2004). The Ethics of Compensation Systems. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (2):149-152.
    Compensation systems are an integral part of the relationships organizations establish with their employees. For many years, researchers viewed pay systems as an efficient way to bring market-like labour exchanges inside organizations. This view suggested that only economic considerations matter for understanding how compensation systems effect organizations and their employees. Advances in organizational research, particularly those focused on issues of justice and fairness, suggest that the fully understanding the outcomes of compensation systems requires examining their psychological, social, and moral effects.
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  21.  9
    Melissa Allen Preissler & Paul Bloom (2008). Two-Year-Olds Use Artist Intention to Understand Drawings. Cognition 106 (1):512-518.
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  22.  9
    Paul Bloom & Csaba Veres (1999). The Perceived Intentionality of Groups. Cognition 71 (1):B1-B9.
  23.  16
    Paul Bloom (2007). More Than Words: A Reply to Malt and Sloman. Cognition 105 (3):649-655.
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  24.  1
    Christina Starmans & Paul Bloom (2012). Windows to the Soul: Children and Adults See the Eyes as the Location of the Self. Cognition 123 (2):313-318.
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  25.  2
    Paul Bloom (1998). Theories of Artifact Categorization. Cognition 66 (1):87-93.
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  26.  24
    Paul Bloom & Lori Markson (1998). Capacities Underlying Word Learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):67-73.
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  27.  8
    Eric Luis Uhlmann, David A. Pizarro & Paul Bloom (2008). Varieties of Social Cognition. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (3):293-322.
    Recent work within psychology demonstrates that unconscious cognition plays a central role in the judgments and actions of individuals. We distinguish between two basic types unconscious social cognition: unconsciousness of the influences on judgments and actions, and unconscious of the mental states that give rise to judgments and actions. Influence unconsciousness is corroborated by strong empirical evidence, but unconscious states are difficult to verify. We discuss procedures aimed at providing conclusive evidence of state unconsciousness, and apply them to recent empirical (...)
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  28.  3
    Kurt Gray, Joshua Knobe, Mark Sheskin, Paul Bloom & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2011). More Than a Body: Mind Perception and the Nature of Objectification. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 101 (6):1207-1220.
    According to models of objectification, viewing someone as a body induces de-mentalization, stripping away their psychological traits. Here evidence is presented for an alternative account, where a body focus does not diminish the attribution of all mental capacities but, instead, leads perceivers to infer a different kind of mind. Drawing on the distinction in mind perception between agency and experience, it is found that focusing on someone's body reduces perceptions of agency but increases perceptions of experience. These effects were found (...)
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  29. Joshua Knobe, Paul Bloom & David Pizarro, College Students Implicitly Judge Interracial Sex and Gay Sex to Be Morally Wrong.
    College students implicitly judge interracial sex and gay sex to be morally wrong Some moral intuitions arise from psychological processes that are not fully accessible to consciousness. For instance, most people disapprove of consensual adult incest between siblings, but are unable to articulate why—they just feel that it is wrong (Haidt, 2001). More generally, there is evidence for at least two sources of moral judgment: explicit conscious reasoning and tacit intuitions, which are motivated by emotional responses (Greene et al., 2001) (...)
     
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  30.  2
    Grant Gutheil, Paul Bloom, Nohemy Valderrama & Rebecca Freedman (2004). The Role of Historical Intuitions in Children's and Adults' Naming of Artifacts. Cognition 91 (1):23-42.
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  31. Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  32.  55
    Paul Bloom (2002). Mindreading, Communication and the Learning of Names for Things. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):37–54.
    There are two facts about word learning that everyone accepts. The first is that words really do have to be learned. There is controversy over how much conceptual structure and linguistic knowledge is innate, but nobody thinks that this is the case for the specific mappings between sounds (or signs) and meanings. This is because these mappings vary arbitrarily from culture to culture. No matter how intelligent a British baby is, for instance, she still has to learn, by attending to (...)
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  33. Irene Bloom (1997). Human Nature and Biological Nature in Mencius. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):21-32.
    Ren-xing can be aptly translated as "human nature," representing as it does the Mencian conviction of and sympathy for a common humanity. The enterprise of comparative philosophy is furthered by drawing attention to the large and important conceptual sphere within which Mencius was working, to his concern for the most fundamental realities of human life, and to his translatability across time and cultures.
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  34. Mia Bloom & John Horgan (2008). Missing Their Mark: The IRA's Proxy Bomb Campaign. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (2):579-614.
    This paper, through a discussion of the IRA's proxy bomb campaigns, challenges the way martyrdom is and has been constructed and forces us to examine terrorist events without preconceived notions. It is important to note that when we witness an event that on the surface appears to be an instance of martyrdom, the reality might be far more complex. Part of the problem has been the current inductive logic associated with the study of terrorism in which attacks are a given (...)
     
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  35.  8
    Paul Bloom & Deborah Kelemen (1995). Syntactic Cues in the Acquisition of Collective Nouns. Cognition 56 (1):1-30.
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  36. Allan Bloom (1974). Leo Strauss: September 20, 1899-October 18, 1973. Political Theory 2 (4):372-392.
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  37. Paul Bloom (2001). Précis of How Children Learn the Meanings of Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1095-1103.
    Normal children learn tens of thousands of words, and do so quickly and efficiently, often in highly impoverished environments. In How Children Learn the Meanings of Words, I argue that word learning is the product of certain cognitive and linguistic abilities that include the ability to acquire concepts, an appreciation of syntactic cues to meaning, and a rich understanding of the mental states of other people. These capacities are powerful, early emerging, and to some extent uniquely human, but they are (...)
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  38.  11
    Deena Skolnick & Paul Bloom (2006). What Does Batman Think About Spongebob? Children's Understanding of the Fantasy/Fantasy Distinction. Cognition 101 (1):B9-B18.
  39.  9
    Bruce Hood, Nathalia L. Gjersoe & Paul Bloom (2012). Do Children Think That Duplicating the Body Also Duplicates the Mind? Cognition 125 (3):466-474.
  40.  30
    Paul Bloom (2008). Three- and Four-Year-Olds Spontaneously Use Others' Past Performance to Guide Their Learning. Cognition 107 (3):1018-1034.
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  41. Harold Bloom (1996). The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages. History of the Human Sciences 9:99-99.
     
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  42.  21
    Paul Bloom (2004). Understanding Children's and Adults' Limitations in Mental State Reasoning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):255-260.
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  43.  40
    T. Bloom (2009). Just Open Borders? Examining Joseph Carens' Open Borders Argument in the Light of a Case Study of Recent Somali Migrants to the Uk. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):231 – 243.
    This essay examines Joseph Carens' open borders argument in the light of a case study of recent Somali migrants to the UK. It argues that, although arguments for significantly more open borders are compelling, they must take into account existing domestic injustice in receiving states as well as existing global injustice.
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  44.  61
    A. A. Hyder, C. B. Krubiner, G. Bloom & A. Bhuiya (2012). Exploring the Ethics of Long-Term Research Engagement With Communities in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Public Health Ethics 5 (3):252-262.
    Over the past few decades, there has been increasing attention focused on the ethics of health research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the increasing focus on the literature addressing human protection, community engagement, appropriate consent procedures and ways to mitigate concerns around exploitation, there has been little discussion about how the duration of the research engagement may affect the ethical design and implementation of studies. In other words, what are the unique ethical challenges when researchers engage with host (...)
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  45.  12
    Jeffrey G. Caron & Gordon A. Bloom (2015). Ethical Issues Surrounding Concussions and Player Safety in Professional Ice Hockey. Neuroethics 8 (1):5-13.
    Concussions in professional sports have received increased attention, which is partly attributable to evidence that found concussion incidence rates were much higher than previously thought. Further to this, professional hockey players articulated how their concussion symptoms affected their professional careers, interpersonal relationships, and qualities of life. Researchers are beginning to associate multiple/repeated concussions with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a structural brain injury that is characterized by tau protein deposits in distinct areas of the brain. Taken together, concussions impact many people in (...)
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  46. David A. Pizarro & Paul Bloom (2003). The Intelligence of the Moral Intuitions: A Comment on Haidt. Psychological Review 110 (1):193-196.
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  47.  26
    Paul Bloom (2000). Young Children Are Sensitive to How an Object Was Created When Deciding What to Name It. Cognition 76 (2):91-103.
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  48.  17
    Stephen L. Bloom (1975). Some Theorems on Structural Consequence Operations. Studia Logica 34 (1):1 - 9.
    Two characterizations are given of those structural consequence operations on a propositional language which can be defined via proofs from a finite number of polynomial rules.
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  49.  47
    Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351-367.
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  50.  63
    Paul Bloom (2008). Psychological Essentialism in Selecting the 14th Dalai Lama. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (7):243.
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