Search results for 'Dorrance Kelly Sean' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sean Dorrance Kelly (2002). Merleau–Ponty on the Body. Ratio 15 (4):376–391.score: 870.0
    The French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty claims that there are two distinct ways in which we can understand the place of an object when we are visually apprehending it. The first involves an intentional relation to the object that is essentially cognitive or can serve as the input to cognitive processes; the second irreducibly involves a bodily set or preparation to deal with the object. Because of its essential bodily component, Merleau-Ponty calls this second kind of understanding ‘motor intentional’. In this (...)
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  2. Sean Dorrance Kelly (2008). Content and Constancy: Phenomenology, Psychology, and the Content of Perception. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):682–690.score: 870.0
  3. Sean Dorrance Kelly, Perceptual Normativity and Human Freedom.score: 870.0
  4. Sean Dorrance Kelly, Closing the Gap: Phenomenology and Logical Analysis.score: 870.0
    phenomenology and logical analysis. John Searle and Bert Dreyfus are for me two of the paradigm figures of contemporary philosophy, so I am extremely proud to have been offered the opportunity to engage with their work. The editors of The Harvard Review of Philosophy, it seems to me, have shown a keen sense of what is deep and important in our discipline by publishing extended interviews with these two influential thinkers. At the same time, writing this article meant entering into (...)
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  5. Sean Dorrance Kelly & Hubert Dreyfus (2011). Saving the Sacred From the Axial Revolution. Inquiry 54 (2):195-203.score: 870.0
    Prominent defenders of the Enlightenment, like Jürgen Habermas, are beginning to recognize that the characterization of human beings in entirely rational and secular terms leaves out something important. Religion, they admit, plays an important role in human existence. But the return to a traditional monotheistic religion seems sociologically difficult after the death of God. We argue that Homeric polytheism retains a phenomenologically rich account of the sacred, and a similarly rich understanding of human existence in its midst. By opening ourselves (...)
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  6. Sean Dorrance Kelly (2005). Closing the Gap. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (2):4-24.score: 870.0
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  7. Walter Gulick (2013). All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular World by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (1):74-78.score: 444.0
    Rarely have I encountered a book like All Things Shining. It bravely engages issues that are truly significant for our time, yet flaws run through it like faults in the California landscape. The book has spawned contentious critique unusual for a work by contemporary philosophers. Before I offer my own critical analysis, it is fitting first to appreciate what Dreyfus and Kelly attempt to achieve.The foremost contemporary problems the authors combat are what they term "the burden of choice" and (...)
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  8. John Scott (2011). Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly , All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning In a Secular Age . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 31 (6):408-410.score: 435.0
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  9. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Relevance of Phenomenology to the Philosophy of Language and Mind. New York: Garland Publishing.score: 340.0
    Through discussion of phenomenological and analytic traditions such as the philosophical problems of perceptual content, the content of demonstrative thoughts and the unity of proposition, Kelly explains that these concepts are not as alien to one another as most people believe.
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  10. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Seeing Things in Merleau-Ponty. In C. Tarman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge. 74-110.score: 280.0
    The passage above comes from the opening pages of Merleau-Ponty’s essay on Edmund Husserl. It proposes a risky interpretive principle. The main feature of this principle is that the seminal aspects of a thinker’s work are so close to him that he is incapable of articulating them himself. Nevertheless, these aspects pervade the work, give it its style, its sense and its direction, and therefore belong to it essentially. As Martin Heidegger writes, in a passage quoted by Merleau-Ponty:
    The (...)
    The goal of Merleau-Ponty’s essay, he says, is “to evoke this un-thought-of element in Husserl’s thought”.3. (shrink)
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  11. Sean D. Kelly (2005). The Puzzle of Temporal Experience. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 208--238.score: 280.0
    There you are at the opera house. The soprano has just hit her high note – a glassshattering high C that fills the hall – and she holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds the note for such a long time that after a while a funny thing happens: you no longer seem only to hear it, the note as it is currently sounding, that glass-shattering high C that is loud and (...)
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  12. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Non-Conceptual Content of Perceptual Experience: Situation Dependence and Fineness of Grain. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):601-608.score: 280.0
    I begin by examining a recent debate between John McDowell and Christopher Peacocke over whether the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual. Although I am sympathetic to Peacocke’s claim that perceptual content is non-conceptual, I suggest a number of ways in which his arguments fail to make that case. This failure stems from an over-emphasis on the "fine-grainedness" of perceptual content - a feature that is relatively unimportant to its non-conceptual structure. I go on to describe two other features of (...)
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  13. Sean D. Kelly (2007). What Do We See (When We Do)? In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Reading Merleau-Ponty: On Phenomenology of Perception. Routledge. 107-128.score: 280.0
    1. The philosophical problem of what we see My topic revolves around what is apparently a very basic question. Stripped of all additions and in its leanest, most economical form, this is the question: "What do we see?" But in this most basic form the question admits of at least three different interpretations. In the first place, one might understand it to be an epistemological question, perhaps one with skeptical overtones. "What do we see?", on this reading, is short for (...)
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  14. Sean D. Kelly, Articles.score: 280.0
    I begin by examining a recent debate between John McDowell and Christopher Peacocke over whether the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual. Although I am sympathetic to Peacocke’s claim that perceptual content is non-conceptual, I suggest a number of ways in which his arguments fail to make that case. This failure stems from an over-emphasis on the “fine-grainedness” of perceptual content – a feature that is relatively unimportant to its non-conceptual structure. I go on to describe two other features of (...)
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  15. Sean D. Kelly (2001). Demonstrative Concepts and Experience. Philosophical Review 110 (3):397-420.score: 280.0
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  16. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Bridging Embodied Cognition and Brain Function: The Role of Phenomenology. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):261-266.score: 280.0
    Both cognitive science and phenomenology accept the primacy of the organism-environment system and recognize that cognition should be understood in terms of an embodied agent situated in its environment. How embodiment is seen to shape our world, however, is fundamentally different in these two disciplines. Embodiment, as understood in cognitive science, reduces to a discussion of the consequences of having a body like ours interacting with our environment and the relationship is one of contingent causality. Embodiment, as understood phenomenologically, represents (...)
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  17. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Sean D. Kelly, Notes on Embodiment in Homer: Reading Homer on Moods and Action in the Light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty.score: 280.0
    Homer has a unique understanding of the body. On his view the body is that by means of which we are subject to moods, and moods are what attune us to our situation. Being attuned to a situation, in turn, opens us to the various ways things and people can be engaging. We agree with Homer that this receptivity is evident throughout our entire existence. It characterizes everything from our basic bodily skills for coping with objects and people to our (...)
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  18. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Sean D. Kelly (2007). Heterophenomenology: Heavy-Handed Sleight-of-Hand. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):45-55.score: 280.0
    We argue that heterophenomenology both over- and under-populates the intentional realm. For example, when one is involved in coping, one’s mind does not contain beliefs. Since the heterophenomenologist interprets all intentional commitment as belief, he necessarily overgenerates the belief contents of the mind. Since beliefs cannot capture the normative aspect of coping and perceiving, any method, such as heterophenomenology, that allows for only beliefs is guaranteed not only to overgenerate beliefs but also to undergenerate other kinds of intentional phenomena.
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  19. Sean D. Kelly (2004). Reference and Attention: A Difficult Connection. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):277-86.score: 280.0
    I am very much in sympathy with the overall approach of John Campbell’s paper, “Reference as Attention”. My sympathy extends to a variety of its features. I think he is right to suppose, for instance, that neuropsychological cases provide important clues about how we should treat some traditional philosophical problems concerning perception and reference. I also think he is right to suppose that there are subtle but important relations between the phenomena of perception, action, consciousness, attention, and reference. I even (...)
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  20. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 280.0
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are likely to (...)
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  21. Sean D. Kelly, The Purpose of General Education.score: 280.0
    I would like to begin by talking about General Education in America. General Education plays a very particular and interesting role in American Higher Education. A typical undergraduate at one of our colleges or universities is expected to satisfy a range of requirements in his or her major area of study (mathematics, economics, philosophy, etc.); and they will also take a range of electives – courses that are not required for graduation but in which the student might want to explore (...)
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  22. Sean D. Kelly, A Moment to Reflect Upon Perceptual Synchrony.score: 280.0
    & How does neuronal activity bring about the interpretation of visual space in terms of objects or complex perceptual events? If they group, simple visual features can bring about the integration of spikes from neurons responding to different features to within a few milliseconds. Considered as a potential solution to the ‘‘binding problem,’’ it is suggested that neuronal synchronization is the glue for binding together different features of the same object. This idea receives some support from correlated- and periodic-stimulus motion (...)
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  23. Donald Borrett, Sean D. Kelly & Hon Kwan (2000). Phenomenology, Dynamical Neural Networks and Brain Function. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):213-228.score: 280.0
    Current cognitive science models of perception and action assume that the objects that we move toward and perceive are represented as determinate in our experience of them. A proper phenomenology of perception and action, however, shows that we experience objects indeterminately when we are perceiving them or moving toward them. This indeterminacy, as it relates to simple movement and perception, is captured in the proposed phenomenologically based recurrent network models of brain function. These models provide a possible foundation from which (...)
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  24. Mark Wrathall & Sean Kelly (1996). Existential Phenomenology and Cognitive Science. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy (4).score: 280.0
    [1] In _What Computers Can't Do_ (1972), Hubert Dreyfus identified several basic assumptions about the nature of human knowledge which grounded contemporary research in cognitive science. Contemporary artificial intelligence, he argued, relied on an unjustified belief that the mind functions like a digital computer using symbolic manipulations ("the psychological assumption") (Dreyfus 1992: 163ff), or at least that computer programs could be understood as formalizing human thought ("the epistemological assumption") (Dreyfus 1992: 189). In addition, the project depended upon an assumption about (...)
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  25. Sean D. Kelly (1999). What Do We See (When We Do)? Philosophical Topics 27 (2):107-28.score: 280.0
    1. The philosophical problem of what we see My topic revolves around what is apparently a very basic question. Stripped of all additions and in its leanest, most economical form, this is the question: "What do we see?" But in this most basic form the question admits of at least three different interpretations. In the first place, one might understand it to be an epistemological question, perhaps one with skeptical overtones. "What do we see?", on this reading, is short for (...)
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  26. David Bohm, Sean Kelly & Edgar Morin (1996). Order, Disorder, and the Absolute: An Experiment in Dialogue. World Futures 46 (4):223-237.score: 280.0
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  27. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Temporal Awareness. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 280.0
  28. David Bohm & Sean Kelly (1990). Dialogue on Science, Society, and the Generative Order. Zygon 25 (4):449-467.score: 280.0
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  29. Sean M. Kelly (1992). Beyond Materialism and Idealism. Idealistic Studies 22 (1):28-38.score: 280.0
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  30. Sean Kelly (1988). Hegel and Morin. The Owl of Minerva 20 (1):51-67.score: 280.0
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  31. Sean D. Kelly (2002). Husserl and Phenomenology. In Robert C. Solomon & D. Sherman (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell. 12--112.score: 280.0
  32. Sean D. Kelly (2002). What Makes Perceptual Content Non-Conceptual? Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy.score: 280.0
    the world. 1 Whereas the content of our beliefs, thoughts, and judgements necessarily involves "conceptualization" or "concept application", the content of our perceptual experiences is, according to Evans, "non-conceptual". Because Evans takes it for granted that we are often able to entertain thoughts about an object in virtue of having perceived it, a central problem in.
     
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  33. Sean Kelly (2006). El contenido no-conceptual de la experiencia perceptual: Su fineza Y detalle Y la dependencia de la situación. Discusiones Filosóficas 7 (10):77-87.score: 280.0
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  34. Sean D. Kelly (2000). Essays in Honor of Hubert Dreyfus, Vol. II. MIT Press.score: 280.0
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  35. Sean D. Kelly (2000). Grasping at Straws: Motor Intentionality and the Cognitive Science of Skillful Action. In Essays in Honor of Hubert Dreyfus, Vol. II. MIT Press.score: 280.0
     
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  36. Sean D. Kelly (forthcoming). On Time and Truth. In Kurt J. Pritzl (ed.), Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy. Catholic University of America Press.score: 280.0
     
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  37. Sean Kelly (2008). Participation, Complexity, and the Study of Religion. In Jorge N. Ferrer & Jacob H. Sherman (eds.), The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, Religious Studies. State University of New York Press.score: 280.0
     
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  38. Sean D. Kelly (2000). Review of Andy Clark, Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World Together Again. [REVIEW] Mind 108:433-7.score: 280.0
    The title of Andy Clark's book is, among other things, a reference to one of the central terms in Martin Heidegger's early work: "Dasein" (being there) is the word that Heidegger uses to refer to beings like ourselves. Clark is no Heidegger scholar, but the reference is deliberate; among the predecessors to his book he lists not only Heidegger himself, but also the American Heidegger scholar Hubert Dreyfus and the French Heideggerean phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. This triumvirate has played an increasingly (...)
     
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  39. Sean D. Kelly (forthcoming). Time and Experience. In A. Brooks & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences. Cambridge.score: 280.0
     
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  40. Joshua Knobe & Sean D. Kelly (2009). Can One Act for a Reason Without Acting Intentionally? In Constantine Sandis (ed.), New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan. 169--183.score: 280.0
     
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  41. Kevin Kelly, Kevin Kelly, Oliver Schulte, Vincent Hendricks.score: 180.0
    Philosophical logicians proposing theories of rational belief revision have had little to say about whether their proposals assist or impede the agent's ability to reliably arrive at the truth as his beliefs change through time. On the other hand, reliability is the central concern of formal learning theory. In this paper we investigate the belief revision theory of Alchourron, Gardenfors and Makinson from a learning theoretic point of view.
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  42. George Armstrong Kelly (1979). A Reply From George Armstrong Kelly. The Owl of Minerva 10 (4):10-11.score: 180.0
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  43. Michael Kelly, Edgar Morin: Introduction (Special Issue Edited by Michael Kelly).score: 180.0
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  44. Kevin Kelly, Kevin T. Kelly and Oliver Schulte.score: 180.0
    We argue that uncomputability and classical scepticism are both re ections of inductive underdetermination, so that Church's thesis and Hume's problem ought to receive equal emphasis in a balanced approach to the philosophy of induction. As an illustration of such an approach, we investigate how uncomputable the predictions of a hypothesis can be if the hypothesis is to be reliably investigated by a computable scienti c method.
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  45. Mary Kelly (2007). 17 Mary Kelly. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. 17.score: 180.0
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  46. Kevin T. Kelly, Julie Clague, Bernard Hoose & Gerard Mannion (eds.) (2008). Moral Theology for the Twenty-First Century: Essays in Celebration of Kevin Kelly. T & T Clark.score: 180.0
     
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  47. Alan Costall (2000). Getting Seriously Vague: Comments on Donald Borrett, Sean Kelly and Hon Kwan's Modelling of the Primordial. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):229 – 232.score: 120.0
    Drawing upon the work of Merleau-Ponty, Borrett et al. (2000) have attempted to model the primordial, "empty heads turned towards the world." Putting the issue of embodiment aside for another day, they propose two separate models, one of movement and the other of perception. While I am sympathetic to the point of their project, I argue in this commentary that their models are insufficiently vague. The following analytic abstractions to which they commit themselves seem seriously at odds with the nature (...)
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  48. Walter Van Herck (forthcoming). All Things Shining. Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age, by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Kelly. International Journal of Philosophy and Theology:1-4.score: 120.0
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  49. John Michael McGuire (2012). Side-Effect Actions, Acting for a Reason, and Acting Intentionally. Philosophical Explorations 15 (3):317 - 333.score: 72.0
    What is the relation between acting intentionally and acting for a reason? While this question has generated a considerable amount of debate in the philosophy of action, on one point there has been a virtual consensus: actions performed for a reason are necessarily intentional. Recently, this consensus has been challenged by Joshua Knobe and Sean Kelly, who argue against it on the basis of empirical evidence concerning the ways in which ordinary speakers of the English language describe and (...)
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  50. Michael Kelly (2003). Iconoclasm in Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Although philosophers have characteristically taken the view that art is a vehicle of some universal meaning or truth, art historians emphasize the concrete, historical location of the individual work of art. Is aesthetics capable of sustaining these two approaches? Or, as Michael Kelly argues: Is art actually determined by its historical particularity? His book covers the views of four philosophers--Heidegger, Adorno, Derrida, and Danto--ultimately iconoclasts, despite their significant philosophical engagement with the arts.
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