Search results for 'Dorsal Stream' (try it on Scholar)

956 found
Sort by:
  1. Kristjan Laasik (2014). Constitutive Strata and the Dorsal Stream. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):419-435.score: 240.0
    In his paper, “The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon,” Michael Madary argues that “dorsal stream processing plays a main role in the spatiotemporal limits of visual perception, in what Husserl identified as the visual horizon” (Madary 2011, p. 424). Madary regards himself as thereby providing a theoretical framework “sensitive to basic Husserlian phenomenology” (Madary 2011). In particular, Madary draws connections between perceptual anticipations and the experience of the indeterminate spatial margins, on the one hand, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jan Kremláček, Miroslav Kuba, Zuzana Kubová, Jana Langrová, Jana Szanyi, František Vít & Michal Bednář (2013). Visual Mismatch Negativity in the Dorsal Stream is Independent of Concurrent Visual Task Difficulty. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  3. Marcelo L. Berthier, Seán Froudist Walsh, Guadalupe Dávila, Alejandro Nabrozidis, Rocio Juarez Y. Ruiz de Mier, Antonio Gutiérrez, Irene De Torres, Francisco Alfaro, Natalia García-Casares & Rafael Ruiz-Cruces (2013). Dissociated Repetition Deficits in Aphasia Can Reflect Flexible Interactions Between Left Dorsal and Ventral Streams and Gender-Dimorphic Architecture of the Right Dorsal Stream. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:873.score: 192.0
    Assessment of brain-damaged subjects presenting with dissociated repetition deficits after selective injury to either the left dorsal or ventral auditory pathways can provide further insight on their respective roles in verbal repetition. We evaluated repetition performance and its neural correlates using multimodal imaging (anatomical MRI, DTI, fMRI and 18FDG-PET) in a female patient with transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) and in a male patient with conduction aphasia (CA) who had small contiguous but non-overlapping left perisylvian infarctions. Repetition in the TCMA (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael Madary (2011). The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.score: 180.0
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Albert Postma, Rob van der Lubbe & Sander Zuidhoek (2001). The Ventral Stream Offers More Affordance and the Dorsal Stream More Memory Than Believed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):115-116.score: 180.0
    Opposed to Norman's proposal, processing of affordance is likely to occur not solely in the dorsal stream but also in the ventral stream. Moreover, the dorsal stream might do more than just serve an important role in motor actions. It supports egocentric location coding as well. As such, it would possess a form of representational memory, contrary to Norman's proposal.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gordon Binsted & Les G. Carlton (2001). When is Movement Controlled by the Dorsal Stream? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):97-98.score: 156.0
    Our commentary focuses on the functional link between the ventral and dorsal systems implied by Norman, as they relate to overt movement. While issues relating to space perception and size constancy are the primary justification for this dual-process theory, the philosophical extensions of this approach are less consistent with examination of motor control and, in particular, motor learning.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Yann Coello & Yves Rossetti (2004). Planning and Controlling Action in a Structured Environment: Visual Illusion Without Dorsal Stream. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):29-31.score: 150.0
    Some data concerning visual illusions are hardly compatible with the perception–action model, assuming that only the perception system is influenced by visual context. The planning–control dichotomy offers an alternative that better accounts for some controversy in experimental data. We tested the two models by submitting the patient I. G. to the induced Roelofs effect. The similitude of the results of I. G. and control subjects favoured Glover's model, which, however, presents a paradox that needs to be clarified.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff (2010). Simulation From Schematics: Dorsal Stream Processing and the Perception of Implied Motion. In. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 2704--2709.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Y. Rossetti (2010). Why Does the Perception-Action Functional Dichotomy Not Match the Ventral-Dorsal Streams in Anatomical Segregation: Optic Ataxia and the Function of the Dorsal Stream. In Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Peter Thier, Thomas Haarmeier, Subhojit Chakraborty, Axel Lindner & Alexander Tikhonov (2002). Cortical Substrates of Visuospatial Awareness Outside the Classical Dorsal Stream of Visual Processing. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. 71-81.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Digby Elliott, Luc Tremblay & Timothy N. Welsh (2001). A Fast Ventral Stream or Early Dorsal-Ventral Interactions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):105-105.score: 126.0
    Several lines of evidence indicate that rapid target-aiming movements, involving both the eyes and hand, can be biased by the visual context in which the movements are performed. Some of these contextual influences carry-over from trial to trial. This research indicates that dissociation between the dorsal and ventral systems based on speed, conscious awareness, and frame of reference is far from clear.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Atkinson J. (2009). Assessing Attention in Children with Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome Using a New Comprehensive Attention Battery: Do These Problems Relate to Visual Dorsal Cortical Stream Deficits? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 120.0
  13. Berit Brogaard (2011). Conscious Vision for Action Versus Unconscious Vision for Action? Cognitive Science 35 (6):1076-1104.score: 90.0
    David Milner and Melvyn Goodale’s dissociation hypothesis is commonly taken to state that there are two functionally specialized cortical streams of visual processing originating in striate (V1) cortex: a dorsal, action-related “unconscious” stream and a ventral, perception-related “conscious” stream. As Milner and Goodale acknowledge, findings from blindsight studies suggest a more sophisticated picture that replaces the distinction between unconscious vision for action and conscious vision for perception with a tripartite division between unconscious vision for action, conscious vision (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Berit Brogaard (2011). Are There Unconscious Perceptual Processes? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):449-63.score: 90.0
    Blindsight and vision for action seem to be exemplars of unconscious visual processes. However, researchers have recently argued that blindsight is not really a kind of uncon- scious vision but is rather severely degraded conscious vision. Morten Overgaard and col- leagues have recently developed new methods for measuring the visibility of visual stimuli. Studies using these methods show that reported clarity of visual stimuli correlates with accuracy in both normal individuals and blindsight patients. Vision for action has also come under (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Karsten Specht (2013). Mapping a Lateralization Gradient Within the Ventral Stream for Auditory Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 72.0
    Recent models on speech perception propose a dual stream processing network, with a dorsal stream, extending from the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere through inferior parietal areas into the left inferior frontal gyrus, and a ventral stream that is assumed to originate in the primary auditory cortex in the upper posterior part of the temporal lobe and to extend towards the anterior part of the temporal lobe, where it may connect to the ventral part (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert Briscoe & John Schwenkler (forthcoming). Conscious Vision in Action. Cognitive Science.score: 66.0
    Conscious visual experience is a source of fine-grained and highly accurate information about the spatial properties of nearby objects. It is thus natural to assume that the spatial information present in visual experience is often used for purposes of intentional, object-directed visuomotor control. Yet this assumption, which we here call the Control Thesis, has been criticized on empirical grounds by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis (TVSH) [Clark 2007, 2009; Goodale & Milner 1992, 2004a, 2008; Milner & Goodale 1995/2006]. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.score: 60.0
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Wayne Wu (2013). The Case for Zombie Agency. Mind 122 (485):217-230.score: 60.0
    In response to Mole 2009, I present an argument for zombie action. The crucial question is not whether but rather to what extent we are zombie agents. I argue that current evidence supports only minimal zombie agency.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Chris Fields (2011). Trajectory Recognition as the Basis for Object Individuation: A Functional Model of Object File Instantiation and Object-Token Encoding. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 60.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. C. Alain, D. Shen, H. Yu & C. Grady (2009). Dissociable Memory- and Response-Related Activity in Parietal Cortex During Auditory Spatial Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 1:202-202.score: 60.0
    Attending and responding to sound location generates increased activity in parietal cortex which may index auditory spatial working memory and/or goal-directed action. Here, we used an n-back task (Experiment 1) and an adaptation paradigm (Experiment 2) to distinguish memory-related activity from that associated with goal-directed action. In Experiment 1, participants indicated, in separate blocks of trials, whether the incoming stimulus was presented at the same location as in the previous trial (1-back) or two trials ago (2-back). Prior to a block (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Christopher Striemer & James Danckert (2013). The Influence of Prism Adaptation on Perceptual and Motor Components of Neglect: A Reply to Saevarsson and Kristjansson. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
    The Influence of Prism Adaptation on Perceptual and Motor Components of Neglect: A Reply to Saevarsson and Kristjansson.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. George J. Andersen (2001). Are the Dorsal/Ventral Pathways Sufficiently Distinct to Resolve Perceptual Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):96-97.score: 54.0
    The author argues that the theory of a dorsal/ventral stream for visual processing can be used to reconcile the constructivist and direct perception theories. My commentary discusses neurophysiological and psychophysical studies that run counter to the view. In addition, the central issue of debate between the constructionist and direct perception approaches regarding what is visual information is discussed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Susan M. Rivera Faraz Farzin (2010). Dynamic Object Representations in Infants with and Without Fragile X Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 54.0
    Our visual world is dynamic in nature. The ability to encode, mentally represent, and track an object’s identity as it moves across time and space is critical for integrating and maintaining a complete and coherent view of the world. Here we investigated dynamic object processing in typically developing (TD) infants and infants with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a single-gene disorder associated with deficits in dorsal stream functioning. We used the violation of expectation method to assess infants’ visual response (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Franco Lepore Johannes Frasnelli, Johan N. Lundström, Veronika Schöpf, Simona Negoias, Thomas Hummel (2012). Dual Processing Streams in Chemosensory Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 52.0
    Higher order sensory processing follows a general subdivision into a ventral and a dorsal stream for visual, auditory, and tactile information. Object identification is processed in temporal structures (ventral stream), whereas object localization leads to activation of parietal structures (dorsal stream). To examine whether the chemical senses demonstrate a similar dissociation, we investigated odor identification and odor localization in 16 healthy young subjects using functional MRI. We used two odors (1. eucalyptol; 2. a mixture of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. G. Hickok & D. Poeppel (2003). Dorsal and Ventral Streams: A Framework for Understanding Aspects of the Functional Anatomy of Language. Cognition 92 (1-2):67-99.score: 50.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gross Joachim (2011). Neural Dynamics of Anticipatory Spatial Attention and its Influence on Perception: The Role of Alpha-Band Modulations in the Dorsal and Ventral Visual Streams. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 50.0
  27. Wayne Wu (2014). Against Division: Consciousness, Information and the Visual Streams. Mind and Language 29 (4):383-406.score: 44.0
    Milner and Goodale's influential account of the primate cortical visual streams involves a division of consciousness between them, for it is the ventral stream that has the responsibility for visual consciousness. Hence, the dorsal visual stream is a ‘zombie’ stream. In this article, I argue that certain information carried by the dorsal stream likely plays a central role in the egocentric spatial content of experience, especially the experience of visual spatial constancy. Thus, the (...) stream contributes to a pervasive feature of consciousness. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thomas Weiss Sandra Preißler, Caroline Dietrich, Kathrin R. Blume, Gunther O. Hofmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner (2013). Plasticity in the Visual System is Associated with Prosthesis Use in Phantom Limb Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
    The experience of strong phantom limb pain (PLP) in arm amputees was previously shown to be associated with structural neural plasticity in parts of the cortex that belong to dorsal and ventral visual streams. It has been speculated that this plasticity results from the extensive use of a functional prosthesis which is associated with increased visual feedback to control the artificial hand. To test this hypothesis, we reanalyzed data of cortical volumes of 21 upper limb amputees and tested the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Athanasios Raftopoulos (2009). Reference, Perception, and Attention. Philosophical Studies 144 (3):339 - 360.score: 30.0
    I examine John Campbell’s claim that the determination of the reference of a perceptual demonstrative requires conscious visual object-based selective attention. I argue that although Campbell’s claim to the effect that, first, a complex binding parameter is needed to establish the referent of a perceptual demonstrative, and, second, that this referent is determined independently of, and before, the application of sortals is correct, this binding parameter does not require object-based attention for its construction. If object-based attention were indeed required then (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.) (2010). Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. Introduction -- Consciousness and Sensorimotor Dynamics: Methodological Issues -- 2. Computational consciousness, D. Ballard -- 3. Explaining what people say about sensory qualia, J. Kevin O'Regan -- 4. Perception, action, and experience: unraveling the golden braid, A. Clark -- The Two-Visual Systems Hypothesis -- 5. Cortical visual systems for perception and action, A.D. Milner and M.A. Goodale -- 6. Hermann Lotze's Theory of 'Local Sign': evidence from pointing responses in an illusory figure, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Mel Goodale (1997). Pointing the Way to a Unified Theory of Action and Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):749-750.score: 30.0
    Deictic coding offers a useful model for understanding the interactions between the dorsal and ventral streams of visual processing in the cerebral cortex. By extending Ballard et al.'s ideas on teleassistance, I show how dedicated low-level visuomotor processes in the dorsal stream might be engaged for the services of high-level cognitive operations in the ventral stream.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Melvyn A. Goodale (2001). Real Action in a Virtual World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):984-985.score: 30.0
    O'Regan & Noë run into some difficulty in trying to reconcile their “seeing as acting” proposal with the perception and action account of the functions of the two streams of visual projections in the primate cerebral cortex. I suggest that part of the problem is their reluctance to acknowledge that the mechanisms in the ventral stream may play a more critical role in visual awareness and qualia than mechanisms in the dorsal stream.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William M. Mace (2001). The Primacy of Ecological Realism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):111-111.score: 30.0
    Whether or not the correspondence of dorsal stream functions to Gibsonian ecological psychology and the ventral stream functions to “constructivism” hold up, the overall goal of capturing a pragmatic realism should not be forgotten.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. H. Chris Dijkerman, A. David Milner & D. P. Carey (1998). Grasping Spatial Relationships: Failure to Demonstrate Allocentric Visual Coding in a Patient with Visual Form Agnosia. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):424-437.score: 30.0
    The cortical visual mechanisms involved in processing spatial relationships remain subject to debate. According to one current view, the ''dorsal stream'' of visual areas, emanating from primary visual cortex and culminating in the posterior parietal cortex, mediates this aspect of visual processing. More recently, others have argued that while the dorsal stream provides egocentric coding of visual location for motor control, the separate ''ventral'' stream is needed for allocentric spatial coding. We have assessed the visual (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004). Plans for Action. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):37-40.score: 30.0
    It is our contention that the concept of planning in Glover's model is too broadly defined, encompassing both action/goal selection and the programming of the constituent movements required to acquire the goal. We argue that this monolithic view of planning is untenable on neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and behavioural grounds. The evidence demands instead that a distinction be made between action planning and the specification of the initial kinematic parameters, with the former depending on processing in the ventral stream and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Katja Fiehler, Annerose Engel & Frank Rösler (2007). Where Are Somatosensory Representations Stored and Reactivated? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):206-207.score: 30.0
    The studies cited by Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) stress the distinction between perception and action within the somatosensory system but provide little information about memory functions. Recent findings by our group and by others show that the dorsal stream is also activated during short-term memory maintenance and long-term memory retrieval of haptic information. These data complement and extend the proposed model.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Pamela D. Butler, Ilana Y. Abeles, Steven M. Silverstein, Elisa C. Dias, Nicole G. Weiskopf, Daniel C. Calderone & Pejman Sehatpour (2013). An Event-Related Potential Examination of Contour Integration Deficits in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    Perceptual organization, which refers to the ability to integrate fragments of stimuli to form a representation of a whole edge, part, or object, is impaired in schizophrenia. A contour integration paradigm, involving detection of a set of Gabor patches forming an oval contour pointing to the right or left embedded in a field of randomly oriented Gabors, has been developed for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia. The purpose of the present study was to assess contributions of early and later (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Marc Sato Maëva Garnier, Laurent Lamalle (2013). Neural Correlates of Phonetic Convergence and Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    Speakers unconsciously tend to mimic their interlocutor's speech during communicative interaction. This study aims at examining the neural correlates of phonetic convergence and deliberate imitation, in order to explore whether imitation of phonetic features, deliberate, or unconscious, might reflect a sensory-motor recalibration process. Sixteen participants listened to vowels with pitch varying around the average pitch of their own voice, and then produced the identified vowels, while their speech was recorded and their brain activity was imaged using fMRI. Three degrees and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Steven L. Small Nira Mashal, Ana Solodkin, Anthony Steven Dick, E. Elinor Chen (2012). A Network Model of Observation and Imitation of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Much evidence has now accumulated demonstrating and quantifying the extent of shared regional brain activation for observation and execution of speech. However, the nature of the actual networks that implement these functions, i.e., both the brain regions and the connections among them, and the similarities and differences across these networks has not been elucidated. The current study aims to characterize formally a network for observation and imitation of syllables in the healthy adult brain and to compare their structure and effective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Barry F. Dainton (2000). Stream of Consciousness: Unity and Continuity in Conscious Experience. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Stream of Consciousness is about the phenomenology of conscious experience. Barry Dainton shows us that stream of consciousness is not a mosaic of discrete fragments of experience, but rather an interconnected flowing whole. Through a deep probing into the nature of awareness, introspection, phenomenal space and time consciousness, Dainton offers a truly original understanding of the nature of consciousness.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Melvyn A. Goodale & Jonathan S. Cant (2007). Coming to Grips with Vision and Touch. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):209-210.score: 24.0
    Dijkerman & de Haan (D&dH) propose a convincing model of somatosensory organization that is inspired by earlier perception-action models of the visual system. In this commentary, we suggest that the dorsal and ventral visual streams both contribute to the control of action, but in different ways. Using the example of grip and load force calibration, we show how the ventral stream can invoke stored information about the material properties of objects originally derived from the somatosensory system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Thomas Baumgartner, Dominique Speck, Denise Wettstein, Ornella Masnari, Gian Beeli & Lutz Jäncke (2008). Feeling Present in Arousing Virtual Reality Worlds: Prefrontal Brain Regions Differentially Orchestrate Presence Experience in Adults and Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:8.score: 24.0
    Virtual reality (VR) is a powerful tool for simulating aspects of the real world. The success of VR is thought to depend on its ability to evoke a sense of "being there", that is, the feeling of "Presence". In view of the rapid progress in the development of increasingly more sophisticated virtual environments (VE), the importance of understanding the neural underpinnings of presence is growing. To date however, the neural correlates of this phenomenon have received very scant attention. An fMRI-based (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Susann Deike, Peter Heil, Martin Böckmann-Barthel & André Brechmann (2012). The Build-Up of Auditory Stream Segregation: A Different Perspective. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The build-up of auditory stream segregation refers to the notion that sequences of alternating A and B sounds initially tend to be heard as a single stream, but with time appear to split into separate streams. The central assumption in the analysis of this phenomenon is that streaming sequences are perceived as one stream at the beginning by default. In the present study, we test the validity of this assumption and document its impact on the apparent build-up (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. M. Husain & P. Nachev (2007). Space and the Parietal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):30-36.score: 24.0
    Current views of the parietal cortex have difficulty accommodating the human inferior parietal lobe (IPL) within a simple dorsal versus ventral stream dichotomy. In humans, lesions of the right IPL often lead to syndromes such as hemispatial neglect that are seemingly in accord with the proposal that this region has a crucial role in spatial processing. However, recent imaging and lesion studies have revealed that inferior parietal regions have non-spatial functions, such as in sustaining attention, detecting salient events (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Thomas Wolbers Magdalena G. Wutte, Michael T. Smith, Virginia L. Flanagin (2011). Physiological Signal Variability in hMT+ Reflects Performance on a Direction Discrimination Task. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Our ability to perceive visual motion is critically dependent on the human motion complex (hMT+) in the dorsal visual stream. Extensive electrophysiological research in the monkey equivalent of this region has demonstrated how neuronal populations code for properties such as speed and direction, and that neurometric functions relate to psychometric functions within the individual monkey. In humans, the physiological correlates of inter-individual perceptual differences are still largely unknown. To address this question, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Trichur Raman Vidyasagar (2013). Reading Into Neuronal Oscillations in the Visual System: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:811.score: 24.0
    While phonological impairments are common in developmental dyslexia, there has recently been much debate as to whether there is a causal link between the phonological difficulties and the reading problem. An alternative suggestion has been gaining ground that the core deficit in dyslexia is in visual attentional mechanisms. If so, the visual aetiology may be at any of a number of sites along the afferent magnocellular pathway or in the dorsal cortical stream that are all essential for a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Richard W. Taylor (1963). The Stream of Thoughts Versus Mental Acts. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (October):311-321.score: 21.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jun Soo Kwon Seung-Goo Kim, Wi Hoon Jung, Sung Nyun Kim, Joon Hwan Jang (2013). Disparity Between Dorsal and Ventral Networks in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Evidence Revealed by Graph Theoretical Analysis Based on Cortical Thickness From MRI. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  49. Carl‐Philipp Heisenberg (2009). Dorsal Closure in Drosophila: Cells Cannot Get Out of the Tight Spot. Bioessays 31 (12):1284-1287.score: 21.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Albert S. Bregman & Jeffrey Campbell (1971). Primary Auditory Stream Segregation and Perception of Order in Rapid Sequences of Tones. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):244.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 956