Search results for 'Dostoevsky' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    N. K. Gavrtushin & F. M. Dostoevsky (2000). Self-Knowledge as a Mystery. Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (3):55-88.
    Man is a mystery. It must be unraveled and if you spend your whole life unraveling it, do not say that this was a waste of time; I am preoccupied with this mystery because I want to be a human being.
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  2. J. Dewey, P. Dhillon, J. Diamond, E. Diener, S. E. Dimond, W. Dodds, J. M. Dostoevsky, D. D'Souza, C. Dyer & A. Edelstein (2010). Day, J., 167 Deci, EL, 56 De Ruyter, 62 Descarte, R., 41. In Yvonne Raley & Gerhard Preyer (eds.), Philosophy of Education in the Era of Globalization. Routledge 231.
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  3. Marcia Allentuck, L. A. Fleischman, M. Esterow, Antonio Banfi, T. Brunius & F. Dostoevsky (1970). The Achievement of Isaac Bashevis Singer. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (3):407-408.
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  4. M. Bakunin, F. Dostoevsky, K. Leont'ev & A. L. Yanov (2007). Three Utopias. Russian Studies in Philosophy 46 (2):52-70.
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  5. Derek Allan (2014). A Logical Redeemer: Kirillov in Dostoevsky’s 'Demons'. Journal of European Studies 44 (2).
    The engineer Kirillov, a major character in Dostoevsky's 'Demons', has provoked considerable critical disagreement. In 'The Myth of Sisyphus', Albert Camus argues that he expresses the theme of ‘logical suicide’ with ‘the most admirable range and depth’. Some recent commentators, however, have dismissed Kirillov as a madman in the grip of a mad theory. -/- While dissenting from Camus’s analysis in certain respects, this article offers an interpretation consistent with his basic argument. Kirillov’s suicide is based on a simple, (...)
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  6.  31
    Dana Freibach-Heifetz (2008). Giving Sense to Generosity-Ethics: A Philosophical Reading of Dostoevsky's the Idiot. Philosophia 36 (4):575-591.
    This paper presents a philosophical reading of The Idiot , which perceives its main protagonist, Prince Myshkin, as a literary hero who chooses the path of generosity. The paper exposes Dostoevsky’s generosity-ethics against the background of Christian ethics, virtue ethics, and the Nietzschean notion of generosity; it further analyzes the problematic aspects of Myshkin’s version of generosity-ethics, and discusses several possible explanations of its catastrophic outcomes in the novel. The paper consists of three parts. The first part presents the rich (...)
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  7.  18
    Peter Roberts (2012). Education and the Limits of Reason: Reading Dostoevsky. Educational Theory 62 (2):203-223.
    Philosophers of education have had a longstanding interest in the nature and value of reason. Literature can provide an important source of insight in addressing questions in this area. One writer who is especially helpful in this regard is Fyodor Dostoevsky. In this essay Peter Roberts provides an educational reading of Dostoevsky's highly influential shorter novel, Notes from Underground. This novel was Dostoevsky's critical response to the emerging philosophy of rational egoism. In this close reading of Notes (...)
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  8.  40
    V. A. Kotel'nikov (2000). Dostoevsky's Prodigal Son. Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):87-100.
    Berdiaev always insisted on his exclusive closeness to Dostoevsky. He attributed to Dostoevsky the main ideas and motifs of his own philosophizing and simply called himself "Dostoevsky's son" in developing the eschatological problematic and on the question of theodicy.
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  9.  56
    Evgenia V. Cherkasova (2004). Kant on Free Will and Arbitrariness: A View From Dostoevsky's Underground. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):367-378.
    Are freedom, rationality, and morality intrinsically connected? Or perhaps freedom's very nature is transgression, going beyond rationality and ethics? These questions are the center of my discussion of free will and arbitrariness in Kant's late writings. Kant's interlocutor here is Dostoevsky's underground man, a passionate proponent of the Russian _volia--("freedom," "unfettered, arbitrary will"). The underground man questions freedom's relationship to rationality and moral law and insists that free will, arbitrariness and even tyranny are inseparable. Finally, in its attack on (...)
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  10.  12
    Peter Roberts (2012). The Stranger Within: Dostoevsky's Underground. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):396-408.
    In Fyodor Dostoevsky?s influential novel Notes from underground, we find one of the most memorable characters in nineteenth century literature. The Underground Man, around whom everything else in this book revolves, is in some respects utterly repugnant: he is self-centred, obsessive and cruel. Yet he is also highly intelligent, honest and reflective, and he has suffered significantly at the hands of others. Reading Notes from underground can be a harrowing experience but also an educative one, for in an encounter (...)
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  11.  4
    Irina Avramets (2000). On the definition of genre of Dostoevsky's works. Sign Systems Studies 28:199-215.
    On the definition of genre of Dostoevsky's works. The article mostly addresses Dostoevsk's own definitions of genres of his works, either explicated in the texts (subtitles, prefaces) or contained in the writer's letters; or rather the relationship between the scholarly strategies of defining genres and the writer's own view, as evidenced. by subtitles which, in some sense, are part of the text (in nearly, but not precisely, the same way as the titles themselves are). The writer's own definitions, then, (...)
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  12.  9
    I. I. Evlampiev (2002). Dostoevsky and Nietzsche: Toward a New Metaphysics of Man. Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (3):7-32.
    The theme "Dostoevsky and Nietzsche" is one of the most important for understanding the meaning of the abrupt changes that took place in European philosophy and culture at the turn of the nineteenth century. This epoch is still a puzzle: it was a flourishing period for the creative powers of European humanity and at the same time the beginning of the tragic "breakdown" of history that gave birth to two world wars and unprecedented calamities, the consequences of which Europe (...)
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  13.  22
    Elizabeth A. Blake & Rubén Rosario (2007). Journey to Transcendence: Dostoevsky's Theological Polyphony in Barth's Understanding of the Pauline KRISIS. Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):3 - 168.
    Anticipating Mikhail Bakhtin’s appreciation for the unfinalizability of Fedor Dostoevskij’s universe, prominent Protestant theologian Karl Barth celebrates the Russian novelist’s presentation of “the impenetrable ambiguity of human life” characteristic of both the ending of Dostoevsky’s novels and Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. Barth’s unique reading of The Brothers Karamazov not only demonstrates the barrenness of the “theocratic dream” but also complements Bakhtin’s discussion of polyphony with an explicitly theological dimension by focusing on the dialogue between Creator and the created. (...)
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  14.  2
    Nikita D. Roodkowsky (1972). Dostoevsky. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):587-598.
    Some of the most characteristic features of the Soviet totalitarian system were foreseen by Dostoevsky through his knowledge of the radical Russian intelligentsia of his day.
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  15.  3
    Richard Findler (2012). Dostoevsky and Kant: Dialogues on Ethics. By Evgenia Cherkasova. The European Legacy 17 (7):953-954.
    (2012). Dostoevsky and Kant: Dialogues on Ethics. By Evgenia Cherkasova. The European Legacy: Vol. 17, No. 7, pp. 953-954. doi: 10.1080/10848770.2012.717914.
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  16.  1
    G. M. Fridlende (1972). The Esthetics of Dostoevsky. Russian Studies in Philosophy 11 (2):148-169.
    Dostoevsky's legacy today calls forth tremendous interest all over the world. And that is understandable: Dostoevsky presented in his work, with utmost vividness and explicitness, many of the social, philosophical, and psychological problems that continue to this day to be central in the mind of humanity.
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  17.  1
    V. L. Merkulov (1972). The Influence of Dostoevsky on the Creative Work of A. A. Ukhtomskii. Russian Studies in Philosophy 11 (2):195-206.
    The scientific career of the outstanding Russian physiologist A. A. Ukhtomskii was complex and full of contradictions. A descendant of Prince Vsevolod Big Nest [Bol'shoe Gnezdo] of Suzdal', he was strongly influenced by the traditions and legends of his caste. As a juvenile he was sent to the Nizhnii Novgorod Corps of Cadets where he developed a profound interest in philosophy, psychology, history, and literature. His fellow cadets of the same age were amazed at, and sometimes ridiculed the young Ukhtomskii's (...)
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  18. Ethan Alexander-Davey, Steven D. Ealy, Khalil M. Habib, Michael Kochin, John P. Moran, Ellis Sandoz, Ron Srigley, David Walsh & Jingcai Ying (2013). Dostoevsky's Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book explores Dostoevsky as a political thinker from his religious and philosophical foundation to nineteenth-century European politics and how themes that he had examined are still relevant for us today.
     
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  19. Richard Avramenko & Lee Trepanier (eds.) (2015). Dostoevsky's Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book explores Dostoevsky as a political thinker from his religious and philosophical foundation to nineteenth-century European politics and how themes that he had examined are still relevant for us today.
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  20. Richard Avramenko & Lee Trepanier (eds.) (2013). Dostoevsky's Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book explores Dostoevsky as a political thinker from his religious and philosophical foundation to nineteenth-century European politics and how themes that he had examined are still relevant for us today.
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  21. Predrag Cicovacki (2007). On the Central Motivation of Dostoevsky’s Novels. Janus Head 10 (1).
    This essay analyzes Marcel Proust’s claim that “Crime and Punishment” could be the title of all of Dostoevsky’s novels. Although Proust reveals some important points regarding the motivation for Dostoevsky’s writings, his account is also inadequate in some relevant respects. For example, while Proust calls our attention to what happens to victimizers, he ignores the perspective of victims; thus Ivan Karamazov’s challenge remains unaccounted for in Proust’s interpretation. More importantly, Proust does not account for Dostoevsky’s optimism, which, (...)
     
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  22. William Gavin (2007). 'Problem 'Vs.'Trouble': James, Kafka, Dostoevsky and 'The Will to Believe'. William James Studies 2.
    John Dewey once said that "it is a familiar and significant saying that a problem well put is half solved." But what happens when the situation at hand can't be "put" into a problem, or it can be put into multiple problems, incommensurate in nature? At issue is whether every situation is at least potentially problematic, or whether some remain, "troublesome," "tragic," or characterizable in some other "non problematic" manner.Dostoevsky and Kafka present us with such instances. The underground man (...)
     
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  23. Iu G. Kudriavtsev (1978). Review of N. Kashina's the Esthetics of Dostoevsky. [REVIEW] Russian Studies in Philosophy 17 (3):89-92.
    All the problems in Dostoevsky's rich and varied work have to be considered in the light of esthetics, for Dostoevsky was not merely a thinker but an artist-thinker. Yet Dostoevsky's esthetics have had comparatively little study. All researchers have touched on it, but there have been no monographs devoted to this particular subject in Soviet Dostoevsky studies.
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  24. John P. Moran (2009). The Solution of the Fist: Dostoevsky and the Roots of Modern Terrorism. Lexington Books.
    The Solution of the Fist: Dostoevsky and the Roots of Modern Terrorism addresses the political and psychological aspects of terrorism as seen through the eyes of a first-generation observer of terrorism, Fyodor Dostoevsky. Through an in-depth analysis of the first novel ever written about terrorism,The Demons, this book explains Dostoevsky's uniquely privileged position in observing this modern political phenomenon.
     
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  25. Mikhail Bakhtin (1984). Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics. Univ of Minnesota Press.
     
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  26. Diane Christine Raymond (2003). Dostoevsky the Thinker (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):568-569.
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  27.  86
    Walter Arnold Kaufmann (1956). Existentialism From Dostoevsky to Sartre. New York, Meridian Books.
  28.  18
    Konstantin G. Isupov (2011). Dostoevsky's Transcendental Esthetic. Russian Studies in Philosophy 50 (3):68-87.
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  29.  20
    J. D. Bastable (1957). Existentialism From Dostoevsky to Sartre. Philosophical Studies 7:200-202.
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  30.  10
    Joe Barnhardt (1997). Bowne, Dostoevsky and Brightman. The Personalist Forum 13 (2):223-232.
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  31.  6
    Vladimir N. Zakharov (2011). What Is Two Times Two? Or When the Obvious Is Anything But in Dostoevsky's Poetics. Russian Studies in Philosophy 50 (3):24-33.
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  32.  26
    C. A. Miller (1973). Nietzsche's “Discovery” of Dostoevsky. Nietzsche-Studien 2 (1):202.
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  33.  8
    Nina Pelikan Straus (2002). Dostoevsky's Derrida. Common Knowledge 8 (3):555-567.
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  34.  17
    Vladimir K. Kantor (2011). Confession and Theodicy in Dostoevsky's Oeuvre. Russian Studies in Philosophy 50 (3):10-23.
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  35.  88
    Timothy O'Connor (2009). Theodicies and Human Nature: Dostoevsky on the Saint as Witness. In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Metaphysics and God. Routledge
  36.  15
    Jeffrie G. Murphy (2009). The Case of Dostoevsky's General. The Monist 92 (4):556-582.
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  37.  7
    Nina Pelikan Straus (2006). From Dostoevsky to Al-Qaeda What Fiction Says to Social Science. Common Knowledge 12 (2):197-213.
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  38.  7
    Sérgio Schaefer (forthcoming). Dialogismo, Polifonia E Carnavalização Em Dostoiévski/Dialogism, Polyphony and Carnivalization in Dostoevsky. Bakhtiniana.
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  39.  6
    G. D. D. (1964). F. M. Dostoevsky. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):480-480.
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  40.  9
    Martha M. Montello & John D. Lantos (2002). The Karamazov Complex: Dostoevsky and DNR Orders. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):190-199.
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  41.  7
    R. Avramenko (2004). Bedeviled by Boredom: A Voegelinian Reading of Dostoevsky's Possessed'. Humanitas 17 (1-2):108-138.
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  42.  30
    James Patrick Scanlan (1999). The Case Against Rational Egoism in Dostoevsky's Notes From Underground. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):549-567.
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  43.  43
    S. Williams (2003). Book Reviews : Remembering the End: Dostoevsky as Prophet to Modernity, by P. Travis Kroeker and Bruce K. Ward. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2001. 280 Pp. Pb. 21.99. ISBN 0-8133-6608-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):112-115.
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  44.  16
    C. A. Miller (1975). The Nihilist as Tempter-Redeemer: Dostoevsky's “Man-God” in Nietzsche's Notebooks. Nietzsche-Studien 4 (1):165.
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  45.  19
    J. Wesley Boyd (1991). Narrative Constructions and Sanity in Dostoevsky and Freud. Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (4):163-171.
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  46.  9
    Ewa M. Thompson (2002). Political Apocalypse: A Study of Dostoevsky's Grand Inquisitor, by Ellis Sandoz. The Chesterton Review 28 (1/2):155-166.
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  47.  12
    Joe Barnhardt (1997). Bowne, Dostoevsky and Brightman: Three Personalists Who Confronted the Problem of Evil. The Personalist Forum 13 (2):223-232.
  48.  4
    Vsevolod E. Bagno (2011). Europe as Goddaughter (Dostoevsky's Second Homeland). Russian Studies in Philosophy 50 (3):48-56.
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  49.  11
    L. F. Foldenyi (2004). Dostoevsky Reads Hegel in Siberia and Bursts Into Tears. Common Knowledge 10 (1):93-104.
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  50.  7
    Robert L. Jackson (1968). Dostoevsky's Quest for Form: A Study of His Philosophy of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (4):562-563.
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