Search results for 'Douglas A. Berman' (try it on Scholar)

235 found
Order:
  1.  9
    Debra Berman & Douglas M. McCabe (2006). Compulsory Arbitration in Nonunion Employee Relations: A Strategic Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):197 - 206.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the most recent public policy and ethical issues as they relate to the growing usage of nonunion employment arbitration particularly in relation to financial services firms and professional firms. In this era of increasing employment-related litigation, it is wise from an employer’s point of view to find alternative procedures that offer assurances of fairness yet provide expeditious means for resolving disputes. From an employee’s vantage point, however, it is essential (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. David Berman (2013). A History of Atheism in Britain: From Hobbes to Russell. Routledge.
    Probably no doctrine has excited as much horror and abuse as atheism. This first history of British atheism, first published in 1987, tries to explain this reaction while exhibiting the development of atheism from Hobbes to Russell. Although avowed atheism appeared surprisingly late – 1782 in Britain – there were covert atheists in the middle seventeenth century. By tracing its development from so early a date, Dr Berman gives an account of an important and fascinating strand of intellectual history.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  3.  14
    Michael P. Berman & Brian A. Lightbody (2010). The Metaphoric Fallacy to a Deductive Inference. Informal Logic 30 (2):185-193.
    Our article identifies and describes the metaphoric fallacy to a deductive inference (MFDI) that is an example of incorrect reasoning along the lines of the false analogy fallacy. The MFDI proceeds from informal semantical (metaphorical) claims to a supposedly formally deductive and necessary inference. We charge that such an inference is invalid. We provide three examples of the MFDI to demonstrate the structure of this invalid form of reasoning. Our goal is to contribute to the set of known informal fallacies.
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Thomas Duddy, David Berman & M. A. Stewart (eds.) (2004). Dictionary of Irish Philosophers, a-Z. Thoemmes Continuum.
    Since 1999 Thoemmes Press (now Thoemmes Continuum) has been engaged in a large-scale programme of biographical dictionaries of philosophy and related subjects. This volume on Irish philosophers follows the standard format of arranging entires alphabetically by thinker. It includes two forms of entry: (1) entries reproduced from previous editions of Thoemmes encyclopedias of British philosophy and (2) wholly new entries on early (renaissance-period) and_ modern (20th century) philosophers, together with some new entries on the intervening centuries. >.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Philip A. Berman (1977). Eleanor D. Berman 1904 - 1977. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50 (6):569 - 570.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    K. Anderson, R. A. Berman, T. Luke, P. Piccone & M. Taves (1991). The Empire Strikes Out: A Roundtable on Populist Politics. Télos 1991 (87):3-37.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  0
    Russell A. Berman (1998). Creation and Culture: Introduction to “Toward a Liturgical Critique of Modernity”. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (113):3-10.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  0
    Russell A. Berman (2008). From Folk to Ummah: A Genealogy of Islamofascism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2008 (144):82-88.
    The “nation” has been the primary unit of political membership in modernity, typically stronger than “region” (the American 1865) and almost always stronger than “class” (the European 1914). Membership in the nation has meant citizenship, the basis of civil rights and civic responsibility within the rule of law. However “nation” is also related to the “people,” the source of all democratic power. The “people” was the population in the age of the democratic revolutions before anything like contemporary mass immigration. While (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  16
    Michael E. Johnson-Cramer & Shawn Berman (2005). A Dynamic Model of Stakeholder Management. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:320-325.
    Existing descriptions of stakeholder management have primarily been static and one-dimensional. In this paper, we offer a multidimensional perspective and outline four main profiles of stakeholder management. We then explain how and why companies change their stakeholder management approach over time.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  37
    Scott Berman (2013). A Platonic Theory of Truthmaking. Metaphysica 14 (1):109-125.
    A Platonic explanation of non-modal and modal truths is explained and defended using non-spatiotemporal entities as their truthmakers. It is argued, further, that this theory is parsimonious, naturalistic, and ontologically serious. These features should commend the view to a wide swath of philosophers.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  34
    Michael Berman (forthcoming). Reflection, Objectivity, and the Love of God, a Passage From Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception. Heythrop Journal 51 (5).
    Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945) essentially aims at debunking the myth of objectivity. The Phenomenology takes the entire Western tradition to task over its reliance on the objective attitude, showing how this attitude structures the architectonics of idealism and empiricism. These philosophies share the same presuppositions: their metaphysics and epistemologies are inherently dualistic. The problematics that stem from this objectivism have informed the Western understanding of God. This essay undertakes an examination of one of the more extended treatments of God (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  0
    Milton Berman (1961). Chapter Two a Spencerian at Harvard. In John Fiske: The Evolution of a Popularizer. Harvard University Press 22-47.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  0
    Milton Berman (1961). Chapter Three Search for a Career. In John Fiske: The Evolution of a Popularizer. Harvard University Press 48-74.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  10
    Paul Schiff Berman (2012). Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence of Law Beyond Border. Cambridge University Press.
    A world of legal conflicts -- The limits of sovereigntist territoriality -- From universalism to cosmopolitanism -- Towards a cosmopolitan pluralist jurisprudence -- Procedural mechanisms, institutional designs, and discursive practices for managing pluralism -- The changing terrain of jurisdiction -- A cosmopolitan pluralist approach to choice of law -- Recognition of judgments and the legal negotiation of difference.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Scott Berman (2003). A Defense of Psychological Egoism. In Naomi Reshotko (ed.), Desire, Identity and Existence. Academic Printing and Publishing
    The purpose of this paper is to argue for psychological egoism, i.e., the view that the ultimate motivation for all human action is the agent’s self-interest. Two principal opponents to psychological egoism are considered. These two views are shown to make human action inexplicable. Since the reason for putting forward these views is to explain human action, these views fail. If psychological egoism is the best explanation of human action, then humans will not differ as regards their motivations for their (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  0
    Tim Rowley & Shawn Berman (2000). A Brand New Brand of Corporate Social Performance. Business and Society 39 (4):397-418.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  17.  3
    Brad Berman (forthcoming). ARISTOTLE, METEOROLOGICA. M. Wilson Structure and Method in Aristotle's Meteorologica. A More Disorderly Nature. Pp. Xvi + 304, Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £65, US$99. ISBN: 978-1-107-04257-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-2.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  19
    Mitchell Berman (2005). Lesser Evils and Justification: A Less Close Look. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 24 (6):681-709.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  25
    Marshall Berman (1976). Liberal and Totalitarian Therapies in Rousseau: A Response to James M. Glass. Political Theory 4 (2):185-194.
  20.  3
    Michael Berman (2007). The Dilemmas of a World Without Design. The European Legacy 12 (6):741-744.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  15
    Jean-Paul Pittion & David Berman (1969). A New Letter by Berkeley to Browne on Divine Analogy. Mind 78 (311):375-392.
  22.  9
    John T. Baldwin & Joel Berman (1977). A Model Theoretic Approach to Malcev Conditions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 42 (2):277-288.
  23.  1
    Abe Oudshoorn, Catherine Ward-Griffin, Cheryl Forchuk, Helene Berman & Blake Poland (2013). Client-Provider Relationships in a Community Health Clinic for People Who Are Experiencing Homelessness. Nursing Inquiry 20 (4):317-328.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    Constance Hoffman Berman (2010). Daniel E. Bornstein, Ed., A People's History of Christianity, 4: Medieval Christianity. Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2009. Pp. Xx, 409 Plus Color Plates; Many Black-and-White Figures. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (1):118-119.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    Marilyn Berman, Malcolm P. Fraser & John Theios (1970). Learning a General Maximum Likelihood Decision Strategy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (3):393.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    Tony Armada, Howard Berman, John Hopkins, Bill Kreykes, Don Wegmiller & Bruce McPherson (2007). What Does It Take to Build a Strong Nonprofit Health Care Board? Inquiry 44 (1):8-14.
  27.  0
    Howard Berman (1972). A Hittite Ritual For The Newborn. Journal of the American Oriental Society 92 (3):466-468.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Russell Berman (1999). Creation and Culture: Introduction to the Special Issue on “Toward a Liturgical Critique of Modernity”. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 113.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  0
    Constance H. Berman (2004). Elizabeth Freeman, Narratives of a New Order: Cistercian Historical Writing in England, 1150–1220. (Medieval Church Studies, 2.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2002. Pp. X, 245. €50. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (1):174-176.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  0
    Constance H. Berman (2000). Ginette Bourgeois and Alain Douzou, Une Aventure Spirituelle Dans le Rouergue Méridional au Moyen Âge: Ermites Et Cisterciens À Silvanès (1120–1477).(Histoire.) Paris: Cerf, 1999. Paper. Pp. 255; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Black-and-White Figures and Facsimiles, Maps, Plans, Tables, Diagrams, and 1 Graph. F 195. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (4):895-896.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  0
    Constance H. Berman (2000). Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Nuns as Artists: The Visual Culture of a Medieval Convent.(California Studies in the History of Art, 37.) Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1997. Pp. Xxvi, 318 Plus 12 Color Plates; Black-and-White Frontispiece, 117 Black-and-White Figures, and 1 Map. $55. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (1):189-191.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  0
    Milton Berman (1961). John Fiske: The Evolution of a Popularizer. Harvard University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  0
    Constance H. Berman (1991). Kathleen Biddick, The Other Economy: Pastoral Husbandry on a Medieval Estate. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1989. Pp. Xvii, 230; 18 Figures, 43 Tables. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (4):847-848.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. David Berman & Timothy Williamson (1988). Locke on Particles: A Reply to Nuchelmans. Logique Et Analyse 31 (123-124):213-218.
  35. David Berman (2008). Philosophical Counseling for Philosophers: A Confession of Images. Philosophical Practice 3 (2):255-266.
    The main aim of this essay is to open up an area of philosophical counseling that may be described as philosophical counseling for philosophers, where philosophical disabilities or impairments can be identified and treated. This is done by going to the field of mental imagery, which is the context in which the author presents his own imagery impairments and the negative impact they have had on his work in philosophy. The author also tries to show how attending to differences in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. J. Berman (2000). Sisters in Sorrow: Voices of Care in the Holocaust. By Roger A. Ritvo and Diane M. Plotkin. The European Legacy 5 (2):269-269.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Laurence D. Berman (1993). The Musical Image: A Theory of Content. Greenwood Press.
  38.  0
    R. Berman, D. Pan & P. Piccone (1990). The Society of the Spectacle 20 Years Later: A Discussion. Télos 1990 (86):81-102.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Martin Calkins & Shawn L. Berman (forthcoming). Introduction: Special Issue:" Business Ethics in a Global Economy": Hosted by the Santa Clara University Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  3
    Russell A. Berman (1984). Modern Art and Desublimation. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (62):31-57.
    Close to the beginning of Death in Venice, Thomas Mann sets up a relationship between aesthetic production and social context that bears strongly on the parameters of twentieth-century cultural life. After introducing his central figure, the fictive writer Aschenbach, Mann goes on to offer some exposition which, as always with Mann, is much more than exposition, since it draws attention to one of the central philosophical questions of the text: “It was a spring afternoon in that year of grace 19--, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  29
    David Berman (1994). George Berkeley: Idealism and the Man. Oxford University Press.
    Unlike nearly all studies of Berkeley, this book looks at the full range of his work and links it with his life--focusing in particular on his religious thought. While aiming to present a clear picture of his career, Berman breaks new ground on, among other topics, Berkeley's philosophical strategy, his account of immortality, his Jacobitism, his emotive theory of religious mysteries, and the motivation of his Siris (1744). Also distinctive is the attention paid to the Irish context of his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  6
    Russell A. Berman & Michael Marder (2009). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2009 (147):3-13.
    Do we face a new rule of lawlessness? On the high seas, in matters of international law and human rights, and even in domestic prosecutorial practices, any grounds to place one's trust in the lawfulness of order seem increasingly elusive. The New World Order appears to be no order at all; the century of secular universalisms leaves us in the state of a general and all-encompassing nihilism. Still, rather than signaling a dead end rife with global despair, the collapse of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  6
    Russell A. Berman (2006). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (136):3-9.
    The previous issue of Telos included a collection of articles concerned with one side of the totalitarian experience in Germany, the Nazi regime and some of its ramifications for political theory, philosophy, and historiography. This current issue, which rounds out the collection of essays organized by Amir Eshel and myself, was initially envisioned as a companion discussion of the second of the two evil twins, Communism, especially in East Germany. After all, the original theorization of totalitarianism in Hannah Arendt's study (...)
    Continental Philosophy
    Direct download (18 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  3
    Russell A. Berman, Paul Piccone & Richard Wolin (1984). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (62):3-7.
    It has been almost half a century since Horkheimer and Adorno formulated their analysis of mass culture in the “Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception” chapter of Dialectic of Enlightenment. This special issue on “Debates in Contemporary Culture” is an attempt to evaluate the relevance of this legacy in the mid-eighties. It has become part of the left conventional wisdom that the critical theory analysis of late capitalism, focusing on concepts such as the “totally administered world” (Adorno) or “one-dimensional society” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    Russell A. Berman (1999). From Brecht to Schleiermacher: Religion and Critical Theory. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (115):36-48.
    It is difficult to start a discussion about religion. The topic irritates the modern public, especially the part that has been schooled in Critical Theory. Enlightenment hostility toward religion, which regularly goes far beyond skepticism, has profoundly shaped sensibilities and the habits of debate. Spoken or unspoken assumptions in the secular public sphere relegate religion to a fully private matter, and, therefore, not an appropriate topic for consideration, let alone a possible source for reflection on current theoretical or political matters. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Russell A. Berman (2012). Humanities and the Public Sphere: Scholarship, Language, Technology. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (159):173-186.
    The concept of the public sphere is the touchstone of Peter Hohendahl's scholarship, which has been profoundly influential on both sides of the Atlantic. One is tempted to suggest that the public sphere is the central concept of Atlanticism. Historically, the urgency of publicness emerged, via Jürgen Habermas's foundational study, in the Federal Republic against the backdrop of the Nazi dictatorship.1 The pursuit of a public sphere represented an insistence on the desideratum of liberal democratic institutions in contrast to totalitarian (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Russell A. Berman (2012). Before the Law. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (160):3-7.
    ExcerptAll rational liberal philosophic positions have lost their significance and power. One may deplore this but I for one cannot bring myself to clinging to philosophic positions which have been shown to be inadequate. Leo Strauss, “Existentialism”1The Supreme Court decision on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the Obama administration's signature legislation on health care, attracted exceptional public attention, and rightly so. Health is a vital concern, and the topic is charged with acerbic party politics. More importantly, the terms (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    Russell A. Berman (2008). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2008 (145):3-6.
    “Community” has long been a companion of Critical Theory, but it has always pointed in two diametrically opposed directions. One path leads us to communitarian dreams of a genuine sociability and a full life. Romantic sensibility, anxious about the modern experience of cold rationality and mechanical organization, elaborates counter-models of authentic living, embedded in organic communities deemed genuine. While the Enlightenment legacy appears to abandon us to alienated isolation—no matter how much it proclaims the importance of public discourse—the romantic community (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Russell A. Berman (2010). Introduction. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):3-8.
    The paradigm of a “new class” originated in socialist Eastern Europe among dissidents and other regime critics as a way to describe the ensconced stratum of managers, technocrats, and ideologues who controlled the levers of power. The rhetorical irony of the phrase depended on the implied contrast with an “old class” as well as the good old class theory of the orthodox Marxism that once served as the established dogma of half the world. The history of class struggle, which had (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Marcia M. Boumil, Emily S. Cutrell, Kathleen E. Lowney & Harris A. Berman (2012). Pharmaceutical Speakers' Bureaus, Academic Freedom, and the Management of Promotional Speaking at Academic Medical Centers. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (2):311-325.
    Pharmaceutical companies routinely engage physicians, particularly those with prestigious academic credentials, to deliver “educational” talks to groups of physicians in the community to help market the company's brand-name drugs.Although presented as educational, and even though they provide educational content, these events are intended to influence decisions about drug selection in ways that are not based on the suitability and effectiveness of the product, but on the prestige and persuasiveness of the speaker. A number of state legislatures and most academic medical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 235